<< Back to Steel Erection Overview Presentation


Slide 1 - The New Steel Erection Rule: Highlights

Slide 1 - The New Steel Erection Rule: Highlights

Slide 1:

Title: The New Steel Erection Rule: Highlights

Background for all of the slides is a overview of a construction sire showing a concrete and steel structure being built. Two cranes are in this photograph. At the bottom right is the title Steel Erection with the Department of Labor's interlocking "L's" adjacent to the title.

At the bottom right is the page number 1.

Slide 2 - Steel Erection Final Rule

Slide 2 - Steel Erection Final Rule

Slide 2:

Title: Steel Erection Final Rule

The first bullet point is: Published January 18, 2001.
The second bullet point is: Implemented January 18, 2002.
The third bullet point is: Includes exceptions for some provisions.

The photograph on this page is a side view of structural steel building under construction. Two workers are in a crane suspended workbasket (platform) doing work on the top beam.

At the bottom right is page number 2.

Script:

The Steel Erection Rule was published on January 18, 2001, and became effective on January 18, 2002.

This rule is the first OSHA safety standard developed under the Negotiated Rulemaking Act of 1990 and the Department of Labor's negotiated rulemaking policy. It was developed in conjunction with industry and union groups.

The new rule addresses the most serious hazards in the steel erection industry and emphasizes maintaining the stability of the structure during construction.

Some of the rule's provisions are being phased in. These are the "component requirements" — provisions that affect the design of components.

Example: columns must have 4 anchor bolts.

Components provisions will not apply if the building permit was obtained (or contract date, for bridges) before January 18, 2001, or steel erection began on or before September 16, 2001.

A requirement for slip-resistant coatings on painted steel surfaces does not go into effect until July 18, 2006.

Slide 3 - Scope

Slide 3 - Scope

Slide 3:

Title: Scope

The first bullet point is: Covers all employers engaged in steel erection activities.
The second bullet point is: Contains two lists of activities:
Under this are two sub-bullet points:
First is, Primary list: All are covered, (connecting, bracing, guying...)
Second is, Ancillary list: Covered only "when they occur during and are a part of steel erection activities" (sealing, caulking, etc...)

At the bottom left is the standard, 1926.750(b).

At the bottom right is the page number 3.

Script:

In general, the scope of the standard is based on activities not the type of structure. There are two lists of activities a Primary List and an Ancillary list.

To determine if an activity is covered by the standard, see if it fits in one of two lists. If it is in the Primary List (.750(b)(1)), then it is covered by the standard. These include activities such as hoisting, placing, connecting, bracing, bolting, etc.

If it is in the Ancillary list (.750(b)(2)), then it is covered ONLY IF it meets a test — the test is whether it is done "during and as a part of" an activity in the Primary list.

For example, there are standing seam metal roofing systems that incorporate a layer of insulation under the metal roof. In the installation process, a row of insulation is installed, which is then covered by a row of metal roofing. Once that row of roofing is attached, the process is repeated, row by row, until the roof is completed. Is the installation of the insulation covered by the standard?

The installation of the row of insulation is not in the Primary list. However, it does fit within the Ancillary list. And the insulation is installed "during and as a part of" the installation of the metal roofing — which is in the Primary list. So, the insulation work is covered.

Slide 4 - Scope (cont'd)

Slide 4 - Scope (cont'd)

Slide 4:

Title: Scope (cont'd)

The first bullet point is: Does not apply to:
Under this are three sub-bullet points:
First is, Electrical transmission towers
Second is, Communication and broadcast towers
Third is, Tanks

The photograph shows a boom crane on the ground erecting an electrical transmission tower.

At the bottom left is the standard, 1926.750(a).

At the bottom right is the page number 4.

Script:

Exclusions:
The new rule does not apply to electrical transmission towers, communication and broadcast towers, or tanks.

Electrical transmission towers are covered in 29 CFR, Part 1926.950, Subpart V

Communication and broadcast towers and tanks are covered under 29 CFR, Part 1926.105, Subpart E.

The rule describes a tank as, "a container for holding gases, liquids, or solids." The final rule, however, does apply to the construction of the steel structure that supports a tank.

Slide 5 - Steel Erection Decision Tree

Slide 5 - Steel Erection Decision Tree

Slide 5:

Title: Steel Erection Decision Tree

The top box is: Is the activity at the jobsite listed in 1926.750(b)1?
Under the top box is a yes and a no box.
Under the yes box is: Then this activity is covered by Subpart R.
Under the no box is: Is the activity listed in 1926.750(b)2?
Under this no box are two boxes, one yes and one no.
Under the yes box is: Then you must determine if this is going on in conjunction with (during and a part of) steel erection activities in (b)1. A question to ask: Does this (b)2 activity have to be done for steel erection to continue: If yes, and if done during (b)1 activities, then it is covered by the standard.
Under the no box is: Because it listed in neither (b)1 nor (b)2, it is not covered by the standard.

At the bottom right is the page number 5.

Script:

Once you determine that none of the exclusions apply, the decision tree for whether the standard applies looks like this. First, is this a Primary activity — one listed in section .750(b)(1)? If it is, then the standard applies. If it isn't, then check to see if the activity in question is in the Ancillary list — section .750(b)(2). If it is also not in that list, then the standard does not apply. If it is in the Ancillary list, then check to see if it meets the test for coverage — is that ancillary activity being done "during and as a part of" a Primary list activity? If it is, then the standard applies. If it is not, then the standard does not apply.

Slide 6 - Key Provisions of the New Rule

Slide 6 - Key Provisions of the New Rule

Slide 6:

Title: Key Provisions of the Rule:

The first bullet point is: Site layout.
The second bullet point is: Hoisting and rigging.
The third bullet point is: Structural steel stability requirements.
Under this are four sub-bullet points:
First is, Column anchorage
Second is, Beams and columns
Third is, Open web steel joists
Fourth is, Structural steel assembly

The photograph is an inside view of a steel building under construction.

At the bottom right is the page number 6.

Script:

The new rule addresses seven key concepts.

Site Layout: The controlling contractor must provide the erector with a safe site layout and on site access roads.

Hoisting and Rigging: The rule provides additional crane safety for steel erection. It minimizes employee exposure to overhead loads through pre-planning and work practice requirements, and prescribes proper procedures for multiple lifts (Christmas-treeing).

Structural Steel Stability Requirements

Many of the provisions in the new standard are designed to increase the stability of the structure during construction.

Column Anchorage: The new rule requires a minimum of four anchor bolts per column, along with other column stability requirements, and adequate procedures for anchor bolts that have been modified in the field.

Beams and Columns: The rule addresses collapse hazards associated with beams and columns, and sets specific requirements for making double connections safely.

Open Web Steel Joists: The rule minimizes the risk of collapse of lightweight steel joists by requiring anchored erection bridging and specifying criteria for attachment of joists to the structure before releasing the hoisting cable.

It adds new requirements to minimize the risk of collapse when placing loads on steel joists. Illustrations and drawings are provided in a non-mandatory appendix.

Structural Steel Assembly: The new rule provides for safer walking/working surfaces by eliminating tripping hazards and minimizing slips through new slip resistance requirements.

Specific work practices have also been added for landing deck bundles and promoting the prompt protection from fall hazards in interior openings.

Slide 7 - Key Provision of the Rule (cont'd)

Slide 7 - Key Provisions of the Rule (cont'd)

Slide 7:

Title: Key Provisions of the Rule (cont'd):

The first bullet point is: System-engineered metal buildings.
The second bullet point is: Falling object protection.
The third bullet point is: Fall protection.
The fourth bullet point is: Worker training.

The photograph shows two workers moving across a structural steel truss that is more than 15 feet from the ground. Both workers are attached to a horizontal life line.

At the bottom right is the page number 7.

Script:

Systems-Engineered Metal Buildings: The final rule addresses requirements to minimize the risk of collapse in the erection of these specialized structures, which account for a major portion of steel erection in this country.

Falling Object Protection: The rule addresses hazards of falling objects in steel erection.

Fall Protection: Fall protection is required for most workers above 15 feet, although there are exceptions for connectors and deckers.

Connectors must be provided fall protection between 15 and 30 feet, but do not have to be tied off.

Deckers can work in a Controlled Decking Zone (CDZ) without fall protection between 15 and 30 feet.

Fall protection is required for all workers above 30 feet, without exception.

Training: The new rule requires that a qualified person train exposed workers in fall protection, and in special, high-risk activities.

Slide 8 - Site Layout

Slide 8 - Site Layout

Slide 8:

Title: Site Layout

The first bullet point is: Adequate layout area.
The second bullet point is: Adequate access roads.

The photograph shows an aerial view of a site with adequate layout space and roads.

At the bottom left is the standard, 1926.752(c).

At the bottom right is the page number 8.

Script:

Requires the controlling contractor to supply the erector with a safe site layout: The new rule requires that adequate access roads and a drained and graded area be provided and maintained by the controlling contractor.

These conditions enable the erector to move around the site and perform necessary operations in a safe manner. They ensure the site is readily accessible to the work area, and gives the erector adequate space for the safe storage of materials and safe operation of the erector's equipment.

Slide 9 - Hoisting and Rigging

Slide 9 - Hoisting and Rigging

Slide 9

Title: Hoisting and Rigging:

The first bullet is: Provides additional crane safety for steel erection.
The second bullet is: Minimizes employee exposure to overhead loads through pre-planning and work practice requirements.

The photograph shows a crane on a site with an adequate layout area.

At the bottom left is the standard, 1926.753.

At the bottom right is the page number 9.

Script:

Provides additional crane safety for steel erection:
The new rule contains requirements for pre-shift inspections of cranes and rigging used in steel erection. It requires that a competent person perform a pre-shift visual inspection of the cranes to be used for steel erection. The visual inspection must be performed before each shift. The competent person typically will be the operator or oiler of the hoisting equipment or, on a large project, the master mechanic who checks each crane.

Minimizes employee exposure to overhead loads through pre-planning and work practice requirements: All hoisting operations in steel erection must be pre-planned to eliminate overhead exposure in most instances. The purpose of the final rule is to address the hazards associated with overhead loads.

These hazards may include failure of the lifting device, or items falling from a load which would create a crushing hazard, or struck-by hazard.

Routes for suspended loads must be pre-planned and employees are prohibited from working under a hoisted load except for those engaged in initial connection activities or employees who are necessary for unhooking the load. For these exceptions to apply, the materials must be rigged by a qualified rigger to prevent unintentional displacement, and hooks with self closing safety latches must be used to prevent components from slipping out of the hook.

Slide 10 - Hoisting and Rigging (cont'd)

Slide 10 - Hoisting and Rigging (cont'd)

Slide 10:

Title: Hoisting and Rigging (cont'd)

The bullet point is: Prescribes proper procedures for multiple lifts (Christmas-treeing)

The photograph is a crane hoisting three pieces of structural steel to two workers who are connectors and are standing on the top floor of a structural steel building.

At the bottom left is the standard, 1926.753(e).

At the bottom right is the page number 10.

Script:

Prescribes proper procedures for multiple lifts (Christmas-treeing).
The new rule now contains procedures for performing multiple lifts. The procedures apply when a steel erector chooses to lift multiple pieces of steel at one time as an alternative to hoisting individual structural members.

This procedure includes the following requirements:

  • Use a multiple lift rigging assembly with a certified 5 to 1 safety factor for capacity.
  • Limit the lift to five members.
  • Lift only beams and similar structural members.
  • Train employees engaged in the lift operation.
  • Ensure that the crane has controlled load-lowering capability whenever loads are over connectors.

The multiple lift rigging assembly must be rigged with the members attached at their center of gravity, kept reasonably level, rigged from the top down, and have a distance of at least seven feet between the members.

Slide 11 - Column Anchorage

Slide 11 - Column Anchorage

Slide 11:

Title: Column Anchorage
The first bullet is: Minimum 4 anchor bolts per column.
The second bullet is: Written notification of proper curing of concrete in footings, piers, walls for steel columns.
The third bullet is: Written notification of adequacy of anchor bolts modified/repaired in the field.

The photograph is a column that is anchored by four bolts to the base plate. The column is shimmed for proper alignment.

At the bottom left is the standard, 1926.752(a), 1926.755.

At the bottom right is the page number 11.

Script:

Requires four anchor bolts per column: All columns must now be anchored by a minimum of four anchor rods/bolts. There is also a strength requirement for the anchorage: it must be designed to resist a minimum eccentric gravity load on the column of 300 pounds.

Also, all columns must be evaluated by a competent person to determine whether they need to be guyed or braced.

Requires written notification of proper curing of concrete in footings, piers, etc., for steel columns: The controlling contractor must ensure that written notifications are provided to the steel erector indicating that the concrete in footings, piers, and walls and the mortar in the masonry piers and walls have cured sufficiently to provide the necessary strength to support the column during steel erection. The concrete has to pass an ASTM field-cure test.

Requires written notification of adequacy of anchor bolt repairs:
The controlling contractor must also notify the erector that anchor bolts that have been repaired, replaced or modified, meet the approval of the project structural engineer of record. This addresses the problem that the erector cannot always tell when an anchor bolt has been repaired and thus may not be aware of a repair unless notified that a repair has been made. If an anchor bolt has been improperly repaired, replaced or modified, it could lead to a collapse.

Slide 12 - Beams and Columns

Slide 12 - Beams and Columns

Slide 12:

Title: Beams and Columns

The first bullet is: Two bolts per connection before releasing hoisting line.
The second bullet is: Safe procedures for making double connections at columns.

The photograph is the use of a seat on the column to which the steel beam can be anchored.

At the bottom left is the standard, 1926.756.

At the bottom right is the page number 12.

Script:

Two bolts per connection before releasing the hoisting line: During the final placing of solid web structural members, the load must not be released from the hoisting line until the members are secured with at least two bolts, per connection, of the same size and strength as shown in the construction documents.

The bolts must be drawn up wrench tight or secured by an equivalent connection as specified by the project structural engineer of record. The requirement for bolts of the same strength and size will prevent collapses caused by the use of lesser strength/size bolts.

Safe procedures for making double connections at columns: A double connection is a type of attachment where the ends of two steel members join to opposite sides of a central (carrying) member — such as a beam, girder or column web — using the same bolts.

After the first member is bolted, a second member is connected to the opposite side of the existing connection. This second member is attached using the same bolts (going through the same holes) used to attach the first member. To attach the second member, the nuts on the first beam's bolts must be removed and the bolts backed most of the way out. The ends of the bolts must be flush with the surface of the central member so that the second member can be lined up with the existing holes. Only fractions of an inch are now preventing the first beam from falling. Once the holes in the connection plate of the second member are lined up with the first beam's bolts, the bolts are pushed back through all the holes and the nuts are put back on the bolts and tightened to secure the three pieces of steel together.

This maneuver is extremely dangerous, and often takes place with a worker sitting on the first beam. If the first beam collapses, the worker falls. The risk of collapse is high because of the tenuous grip of the loosened bolts and the possibility that the connector's spud wrench, which is used to align the second member, may slip.

The new rule requires that when making a double connection at or near a column, the first member must remain connected to a supporting member by at least one connection bolt at all times unless a connection seat or equivalent connection device is supplied with the members to secure the first member.

Slide 13 - Open Web Steel Joists

Slide 13 - Open Web Steel Joists

Slide 13:

Title: Open Web Steel Joists

The first bullet point is: Minimize the risk of collapse of lightweight steel joists by:
Under this are three sub-bullet points:
First is, Specifying erection bridging and methods of attachment
Second is, Requiring erection bridging to be anchored to terminus point
Third is, Specifying method of placing loads on steel joists

The upper photograph is diagonal bridging that is bolted to a steel joist or joists. The lower photograph is steel joist bridging connected to a bridging terminus point.

At the bottom left is the standard, 1926.757.

At the bottom right is the page number 13.

Script:

Minimize the risk of collapse of lightweight steel joists by addressing the need for anchored erection bridging and methods of attachment: The final rule requires certain open web joists to have erection bridging installed and anchored before the hoisting cable is released. Tables are supplied in the rule to identify which type and length of joist must have this erection bridging.

The standard also sets the maximum number of workers that may be on the joist before all bridging is installed and anchored. "Anchored" erection bridging is bolted diagonal bridging that is anchored back to a terminus point, as shown in the lower picture on the slide.

There are also requirements and specifications for both the initial attachment of joists and their final attachment. For example, some joists must be supplied with holes and initially attached by bolting.

New requirements to minimize collapse in placing loads on steel joists: The new rule establishes work practices regarding landing and placing loads on steel joists. In general, loads are prohibited on steel joists until all bridging is installed and anchored and all joist bearing ends are attached. There are specific requirements for landing joist bundles and decking bundles.

Slide 14 - Structural Steel Assembly

Slide 14 - Structural Steel Assembly

Slide 14:

Title: Structural Steel Assembly

The first bullet point is: Specific work practices:
Under this is one sub-bullet point:
Hoisting deck bundles.

The photograph is of an employee standing on a beam, signaling the crane operator to place a bundle of steel decking on another beam.

At the bottom left is the standard, 1926.757.

At the bottom right is the page number 14.

Script:

Specific work practices regarding hoisting deck bundles: The new rule restricts the use of bundle straps for hoisting. Unless designed for hoisting, they can break apart or loosen, create a falling object hazard or, if a structural member is hit by the bundle or its contents, cause the structure to collapse.

Slide 15 - Structural Steel Assembly (cont'd)

Slide 15 - Structural Steel Assembly (cont'd)

Slide 15:

Title: Structural Steel Assembly (cont'd)

The first bullet point is: Minimizing fall hazards:
Under this is three sub-bullet points:
First is, Trip hazards
Second is, Interior holes/openings
Third is, Slip hazards

The photograph shows tripping hazards from the shear connectors that are sticking up from the metal decking. There is a warning line of yellow tape barricade around a hole in the decking. The perimeter of the deck area has guardrails. The picture is titled: Shear Connectors.

At the bottom left is the standard, 1926.754.

At the bottom right is the page number 15.

Script:

Minimizing fall hazards: Trip hazards are reduced by requiring shear connectors to be field-installed rather than shop-installed. That will eliminate this trip hazard by ensuring that workers have a clear surface to walk on while members are being erected.

There are work practice requirements to minimize the number of interior holes and openings:

  • All openings should be decked over if possible.
  • Large openings (elevator shafts, stairwells, etc.) must be otherwise protected if not decked over.
  • Cut holes and openings only when the equipment or structures that will fill them are ready to be installed.
  • Gaps around columns must be covered.

The slip hazard caused by painted coatings on skeletal structural steel is addressed by a new slip resistance requirement. To give the industry time to complete development of coatings that will meet the requirement, this provision will not go into effect until July 18, 2006.

Slide 16 - Systems-Engineered Metal Buildings

Slide 16 - Systems-Engineered Metal Buildings

Slide 16:

Title: Systems-Engineered Metal Buildings

The bullet point is: Requirements to minimize the risk of collapse in the erection of these specialized structures that account for a major portion of steel erection in this country.

The photograph is a field assembled metal building system.

At the bottom left is the standard, 1926.754.

At the bottom right is the page number 16.

Script:

Minimize the risk of collapse in erection of Systems-Engineered Buildings: Systems-engineered metal buildings are often used for anything from sheds to larger structures such as warehouses, gymnasiums, airplane hangars, and arenas. These buildings use different types of steel members and a different erection process than typical steel erection.

Slide 17 - Falling Object Protection

Slide 17 - Falling Object Protection

Slide 17:

Title: Falling Object Protection

The bullet point is: Provisions that address hazards of falling objects in steel erection.
Under that is, Note: Does not apply to materials being hoisted.

The photograph is an employee on an outrigger platform with guardrail system on the perimeter, signaling a crane to land materials.

At the bottom left is the standard, 1926.754.

At the bottom right is the page number 17.

Script:

Provisions that address hazards of falling objects in steel erection: The new rule requires that employees be protected from falling objects. This is a real everyday hazard, as loose items that have been placed aloft that can fall and strike employees working below. All materials, equipment, and tools that are not in use while aloft must either be secured against accidental displacement, or the controlling contractor must bar operations below steel erection.

When it is necessary to work below ongoing steel erection activities (other than hoisting), overhead protection must be provided. If protection is not provided, work by other trades is not permitted below steel erection work. One way a controlling contractor can reduce these hazards is by scheduling work so employees are not exposed.

This part of the standard does NOT deal with the hazard of hoisted materials falling. That hazard is dealt with in the Hoisting and Rigging section.

Slide 18 - Fall Protection

Slide 18 - Fall Protection

Slide 18:

Title: Fall Protection

The first point is: Above 30 feet/2 stories: All workers must be protected, including connectors and deckers.
The second point is: Between 15 and 30 feet/2 stories: Workers must be protected EXCEPT:
Under this is two sub- points:
First is, Connectors
Second is, Deckers working in controlled decking zone (CDZ)

At the bottom left is the standard, 1926.760.

At the bottom right is the page number 18.

Script:

Fall protection requirements: Fall protection means systems and devices that either physically prevent a worker from falling or arrest a worker's fall. Under the new standard, all workers must be protected at heights greater than 30 feet (or two stories, whichever is less) including connectors and deckers.

However, between 15 and 30 feet/two stories, all workers must be protected with two exceptions. The exceptions are for connectors and for leading edge deckers working in a controlled access zone.

Slide 19 - Fall Protection (cont'd)

Slide 19 - Fall Protection (cont'd)

Slide 19:

Title: Fall Protection (cont'd)

The bullet point is: Connectors between 15 and 30 feet/2 stories.
Under this is two sub-bullet points:
First is, All equipment necessary to be capable of being used to be tied off (or safety nets) must be in place.
Second is, Not required to tie-off.

The photograph is a connector walking a horizontal beam using a horizontal safety line for fall protection.

At the bottom left is the standard, 1926.760(b).

At the bottom right is the page number 19.

Script:

Connectors between 15 and 30 feet/ two stories: At heights between 15 and 30 feet/ two stories, the steel erector must provide conventional fall protection equipment. However, connectors are not required to actually tie-off. So, unless protected by nets or other passive devices, the employer must provide an anchor point and all associated fall arrest equipment. The connector must wear all equipment necessary to tie-off. But that connector need not attach the lanyard to the anchor.

Slide 20 - Fall Protection (cont'd)

Slide 20 - Fall Protection (cont'd)

Slide 20:

Title: Fall Protection (cont'd)

The bullet point is: Deckers between 15 and 30 feet/2 stories.
Under this is one sub-bullet point:
Can use a controlled decking zone (CDZ) instead of fall protection.

The top photograph is an example of the use of a CDZ on a metal deck. The lower photograph shows employees installing decking while wearing fall protection.

At the bottom left is the standard, 1926.760(c).

At the bottom right is the page number 20.

Script:

Deckers between 15 and 30 feet (or two stories):
The CDZ is an alternative to fall protection for leading edge decking workers between 15 and 30 feet/two stories above a lower level. If an employer establishes a CDZ in this height range, employees authorized to be in the CDZ do not have to be provided with or use a fall protection system.

An important aspect of a CDZ is controlled access. Data indicates that some employees who suffered fatal falls from areas that were being decked were not engaged in leading edge work. The rule therefore limits access to the CDZ exclusively to those employees who are actually engaged in and trained in the hazards involved in leading edge work.

The CDZ boundaries must be clearly marked to restrict access to the area. The CDZ can be no more than 90 feet wide and 90 feet deep from any leading edge. There can be no more than 3,000 square feet of unsecured decking in a CDZ.

Employees working in a controlled decking zone must be trained to recognize the hazards associated with working in a (CDZ). They must be trained in the establishment, access, safe installation techniques and effective work practices required by the CDZ and Metal Decking provisions.

Slide 21 - Training

Slide 21 - Training

Slide 21:

Title: Training

The first bullet point is: Qualified person to train exposed workers in fall protection.
The second bullet point is: Qualified person to train exposed workers engaged in special, high-risk activities.
The photograph is a qualified person providing training to a group of workers.

At the bottom left is the standard, 1926.761.

At the bottom right is the page number 21.

Script:

Requires a qualified person to train exposed workers in fall protection:
Due to the new requirements involving more widespread use of personal fall protection equipment and special procedures in steel erection, a qualified person is now required to train all exposed workers in fall protection.

The employer can choose the provider, and method and frequency of training for the employees being trained. The provider may be an outside, professional training organization, or other qualified entity, or the employer may develop and conduct the training in-house. Each employee, however, must be provided the training before exposure to the hazard.

Requires qualified person to train exposed workers in special, high-risk activities: Additional training is also required for employees engaged in special high-risk activities such as multiple lift rigging procedures, connecting activities, and work in controlled decking zones. At a minimum the training must cover the nature of the hazards, proper procedures, and work practices required when engaged in these activities.

Slide 22 - Specific Controlling Contractor Duties

Slide 22 - Specific Controlling Contractor Duties

Slide 22:

Title: Specific Controlling Contractor Duties

The first bullet point is: Notify the steel erector in writing regarding concrete cure and anchor bolt changes.
The second bullet point is: Provide adequate layout areas and onsite access roads.
The third bullet point is: Preclude work below steel erection unless there is overhead protection.
The fourth bullet point is: Choose whether to accept responsibility for maintaining fall protection equipment left by erector (otherwise it must be removed).

At the bottom right is the page number 22.

Script:

Four specific duties in the standard are placed specifically on the controlling contractor. They are:

Written notification to the steel erector: The new rule is designed to ensure proper communication and pre-planning between contractors pouring concrete footings, contractors making repairs to anchor bolts, the controlling contractor, and the steel erector.

This communication must take place before the beginning of steel erection. The written notifications can be transmitted electronically.

Provide adequate layout areas and on-site access roads: The final rule requires that the controlling contractor provide and maintain the access roads and a drained and graded area. These conditions enable the steel erector to move around the site and perform necessary operations in a safe manner. The provision does not apply to roads outside of the construction site.

Preclude work below steel erection unless there is overhead protection: When it is necessary to have work performed below on-going steel erection activities (other than hoisting), effective overhead protection must be provided by the employer to those workers to prevent injuries from falling objects.

If this protection is not provided, the controlling contractor must not permit work by other trades below the steel erection work.

Choose whether to accept responsibility for fall protection left by the erector: The new rule addresses the need to ensure that fall protection equipment is maintained even after steel erectors have completed their work. Typically, perimeter safety cables are initially installed and maintained by the steel erector, but the cables are still there after steel erection work is completed.

Under the new standard, the controlling contractor must choose either to accept responsibility for this fall protection equipment — and make sure that it is maintained — or have it removed.

Slide 23 - OSHA's Website

Slide 23 - OSHA's Website

Slide 23:

Title: OSHA's Website

The first bullet point is: View the complete standard at www.osha.gov.
The second bullet point is : View the steel erection information website at www.osha.gov/doc/steelerection/index.html.

At the bottom right is the page number 23.

Script:

You can view the complete standard on our website.

OSHA is developing an electronic tool with training presentations, a handbook with technical links, and frequently asked questions that will provide further help in explaining the standard.

Should you have any further questions, do not hesitate to view the steel erection information web site.