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Page last reviewed: 12/05/2007

Highlights

Resources on Cleaning Chemicals

Protect Yourself: Cleaning Chemicals and Your Health

Spanish Language Resources

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Cleaning Industry

The institutional and industrial cleaning industry provides essential products and services that are used to clean and maintain a healthy indoor environment for commercial establishments of all sizes and types, including schools, hospitals, day care centers, food service operations, office complexes, and other similar establishments. The industry includes manufacturers and distributors of cleaning products in addition to in-house and contracted service providers.

As in many industries, employees in the cleaning industry face a number of hazards. Cleaning industry employees may be exposed to potentially hazardous chemicals, may be asked to work with equipment that can present a danger and may be asked to perform various tasks that may cause an injury or illness if not performed properly. Further, the physical environment in which cleaning services are performed can present hazards.

OSHA standards and guidelines play a key role in eliminating or minimizing these hazards and are crucial to ensuring a safe and healthy work environment. Cleaning Industry hazards are addressed in specific standards for the general industry.

How can OSHA help?

OSHA has developed this webpage to provide workers and employers useful, up-to-date information on concrete and concrete products. For other valuable worker protection information, such as Workers' Rights, Employer Responsibilities and other services OSHA offers, read OSHA's Workers page. For additional resources to help employers comply with and workers understand OSHA requirements, read OSHA's Compliance Assistance page.



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