OSHA Strategic Partnership Program<< Back to Annual Evaluations


Summary

OSHA Strategic Partnership (OSP) Name
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Strategic Partnership (OSP) with the Electrical Transmission and Distribution (ET&D) Construction Contractors, the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW), National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA), and the Edison Electrical Institute (EEI) (OSHA and ET&D OSP)
 
Purpose of OSP
Overview: The OSHA and ET&D OSP was originally signed on August 20, 2004. The OSP was renewed on August 24, 2006 and September 16, 2008. The current agreement is in effect until September 16, 2010.

OSP Structure: The OSP’s Executive Team, made up of CEO-level management, meets approximately three to four times per year to review progress and determine next steps. The OSP’s Steering Team, made up of corporate safety and health managers, meets approximately every four to six weeks and manages day-to-day operations of the OSP and serves as the liaison between the Executive Team and the Task Teams. Task Teams are groups of employees and supervisors who meet as needed to focus on specific OSP topics. There are currently four Task Teams: Data, Training, Best Practices, and Communication. There is also OSHA representation on all of the OSP’s Executive, Steering and four Task Teams.
Goals of OSP
Goal Strategy Measure
1) Perform data analysis as a means to establish causes of fatalities, injuries, and illnesses for electrical work in the Industry (Data for work performed under both normal and emergency situations will be included). Through a specific Task Team:

a) Obtain industry-specific Days Away from Work, Restricted Work Activity, or Job Transfer (DART) and Total Case Incident Rate (TCIR) Rates base upon partner recordable injuries and illnesses per man hour worked annually.

b) Develop a concise database of accidents and incidents involving fatalities and serious injuries.

c) Analyze accident and incident data to identify common causes for fatalities, injuries, and illnesses suffered by linemen, apprentices, and other appropriate job classifications (The Steering Team will determine the manner in which data will be collected and reported).

Through the Steering Team:

a) Based on collected data, identify and prioritize the target areas that are causing serious injuries and fatalities. Areas covered may include PPE requirements, approach distances, and grounding. The designated areas will be assigned to specific Task Teams to develop strategies for addressing these causes, including::
  • Consensus Best Practices
  • Training
  • Outreach and Communication
Develop Metrics, including but not limited to:

i. Baseline DART and TCIR OSP rates for Partners compared to published BLS averages for the industry, and any other metrics identified by the Steering Team
2) Develop Best Practices to reduce the number of fatalities, injuries, and illnesses that directly correspond to the identified causes, as well as any other significant hazards identified by the OSP. Through a specific Task Team:

a) Develop consensus Best Practices for each identified cause. These causes will relate to the maintenance, repair, and construction of transmission and distribution systems (Procedures should be appropriate under both normal and emergency situations).

b) Share Best Practices among participants.

c) Develop implementation strategies for each Best Practice. Implementation strategies should include all major milestones, projected timelines, and means of verification.

d) Recognize implementation of Best Practices and post results on a common OSP website.

Evaluate the media utilized by all members to present Best Practices.
Develop metrics related to
required work practices,
including but not limited to:

i. Number of consensus Best Practices developed.

ii. Number of consensus Best Practices posted on common website or through other electronic tools.

iii. Number of Best Practices effectively implemented by participants.
3) Ensure that the participating employers’ employees are effectively trained to utilize the established Best Practices, including:
  • Minimum qualifications of T&D construction linemen;
  • Standards for quality and consistency of training for:
    • Apprentices and
    • In service training for lineworkers;
  • Minimum skill set qualifications for T&D construction foremen, general foremen, and supervisors;
Retraining/refresher training of linemen, foremen, general foremen, and supervisors.
Through a specific Task Team, in addition to training required pursuant to the OSH Act:

a) Identify training criteria for foremen, general foremen, and supervisors, including training to promote industry culture change to place value on safety and health.

b) Identify training criteria for linemen, including training to promote industry culture change to place value on safety and health.

c) Identify training culture for apprentices, including training to promote culture change to place value on safety and health.

d) Develop a procedure for
uniform evaluation and communication of skill levels (i.e. SmartCard or like database system).

e) Develop a procedure for certification or documentation of training prior to starting a new or changed job with participants.

f) Develop a means for participating employers to address repeated failures to follow training and violations of safety procedures.

g) Create re-training/refresher standards for linemen, apprentices, foremen, general foremen, supervisors, and any other relevant job classification
Develop metrics related to required training/re-training and refresher training requirements, including but not limited to:

i. Number or percentage of supervisors receiving the minimum training and/or re-training.

ii. Number or percentage of linemen receiving the minimum training and/or retraining.

iii. Number or percentage of apprentices receiving the minimum training and/or retraining.

iv. Number or percentage of linemen and supervisors receiving certification, when developed.

v. Number or percentage of employees who have successfully mastered skills and procedures established in Best Practices.
Anticipated Outcomes
OSHA and the OSP participants will continue to collaborate to provide safe and healthful work environments for employees and contractors involved in the electrical transmission and distribution industry by striving to prevent and eliminate serious accidents, injuries and fatalities through increased supervisor, foremen/general foremen training, implementation of best practices, enhancement of safety and health management systems, and being in-compliance with OSHA standards and regulations for this industry.

Through the OSHA and ET&D OSP, OSHA staff and the participating companies will continue to build on the excellent working relationship established since the first OSP was signed in 2004. The improved communication and good attendance by OSP participants at the meetings facilitated the development and implementation of seven Best Practices documents. The OSP participants will continue to focus on tracking the implementation of these Best Practices documents so as to measure their impact.

The OSHA and ET&D OSP has been successful in reducing partner industry fatalities and injury/illness rates. Through the OSPs Task Teams, OSHA and the OSP participants will continue to analyze accident and incident data to identify common causes for fatalities, injuries, and illnesses suffered by linemen, apprentices, and other appropriate job classifications. OSHA staff and the OSP participants will work together to develop an OSHA Form 170 supplemental document. This document will be used to support meeting the OSP’s goal of collecting more substantive fatality and serious accident data for use in analysis and identification of areas to develop and disseminate best practices documents. Through the safety awareness raised by the implementation of Best Practices documents and industry-specific training courses OSHA anticipates continued improvement in the key indicators, i.e. injury, illness and fatality data.

In addition, through the OSP, Executive Committee, Steering Committee and Task Teams members continue to pursue efforts to promote a safety culture change by placing value on safety and health throughout the ET&D industry.
 
Strategic Management Plan Target Areas (check one)
Construction X Manufacturing Amputations  
Non-Construction X    
Strategic Management Plan Areas of Emphasis (check all applicable)
Amputations in Construction   Oil and Gas Field Services  
Blast Furnaces and Basic Steel Products   Preserve Fruits and Vegetables  
Blood Lead Levels   Public Warehousing and Storage  
Concrete, Gypsum and Plaster Products   Ship/Boat Building and Repair  
Ergo/Musculoskeletal   Silica-Related Disease  
Landscaping/Horticultural Services      


Section 1 - General Partnership Information
 
Date of Evaluation Report  
Evaluation Period:
Start Date 1/1/2008 End Date 12/31/2008

Evaluation OSHA Contact Person Richard L. Harris
Originating Office OSHA National Office – Washington DC
 
Partnership Coverage
# Active Employers 6 # Active Employees 18,000*
 
Industry Coverage (note range or specific SIC and NAICS for each partner)
Partner SIC NAICS
Henkels & McCoy, Inc 1623 237130
Quanta Services, Inc. 1623 237130
MDU Construction Services Group, Inc. 1623 237130
Asplundh Tree Expert Co. 1623 237130
Pike Electric, Inc. 1623 237130
MYR Group, Inc.    


Section 2 - Activities Performed
 
Note whether an activity was required by the OSP and whether it was performed
Required Performed
a. Training Yes Yes
b. Consultation Visits No No
c. Safety and Health Management Systems Reviewed/Developed Yes Yes
d. Technical Assistance Yes Yes
e. VPP-Focused Activities No Yes
f. OSHA Enforcement Inspection No Yes
g. Offsite Verifications Yes Yes
h. Onsite Non-Enforcement Interactions No No
i. Participant Self-Inspections No No
j. Other Activities No No
 
2a. Training (if performed, provide the following totals)
Training sessions conducted by OSHA staff 0
Training sessions conducted by non-OSHA staff 495
Employees trained 5,921
Training hours provided to employees 67,725
Supervisors/managers trained 3,263
Training hours provided to supervisors/managers 70,901
Comments/Explanations (briefly describe activities, or explain if activity required but not performed)
Task Team II coordinates all of the training efforts for the OSP. Some of the duties of this Task Team include: developing training courses as needed to address the identified causal factors of accidents; tracking the training courses and promoting the OSP’s training efforts throughout the industry.
During 2008, the OSP participants continued to conduct the Supervisory Leadership Skills Outreach Training (SLSOT) course. This course is designed to help foremen, general foremen and field supervisors create a safe work culture on the job and course attendees receive an OSHA training card upon successfully completing the course. The OSP participants also developed and implemented an ET&D industry-specific OSHA 10-Hour Outreach Training Program Line Construction Course. The OSHA 10-Hour course is intended for line workers and supervisory employees. A total of 3,263 supervisors and managers completed SLSOT training during the evaluation period. In addition, 5,921 people completed the ET&D industry-specific OSHA 10-Hour Outreach Training Program Line Construction Course during the evaluation period. This number includes apprentices, journeymen, and foremen/general foremen.

In addition, the SLSOT and ET&D industry-specific OSHA 10-Hour Outreach Training Program Line Construction courses’ curriculum were updated during the reporting period by the OSP participants to include the Best Practices documents developed through the OSP. Separate training on updated Best Practice documents is provided as needed by the partners.
 
2b. Consultation Visits (if performed, provide the following total)
Consultation visits to partner sites 0
Comments/Explanations (briefly describe activities, or explain if activity provided for but not performed)
The OSP does not track this information.
 
2c. Safety and Health Management Systems (if performed, provide the following total)
Number of systems implemented or improved using the OSHA’s 1989 Guidelines for Safety and Health Management Programs as a model 6
Comments/Explanations (briefly describe activities, or explain if activity provided for but not performed)
All six OSP participating companies reported that their Safety and Health Management Systems (SHMS) were improved during this evaluation period.

The implementation of the Best Practices documents helped the OSP participating companies to continually improve their SHMS. These improvements related to hazard analysis and correction, training, employee involvement and management commitment.
 
2d. Technical Assistance (if performed, note type and by whom)
Provided by OSHA Staff Provided by Partners Provided by Other Party
Conference/Seminar Participation 2
Interpretation/Explanation of Standards or OSHA Policy
Abatement Assistance 2
Speeches 9
Other (please specify)
Comments/Explanations (briefly describe activities, or explain if activity provided for but not performed)
Examples of the technical assistance OSP participants conducted during 2008 include the following:
Henkels & McCoy reported that its representatives gave a combined total of five presentations at Edison Electric Institute, Midwest Energy Association and American Electric Power events.

MYR Group reported attendance at two conferences and two speeches. MYR representatives participated in the National Safety Council Utilities Division meetings where they took part in a panel discussion on the successes of the OSHA and ET&D OSP. MYR added that similar discussions were also held during the joint meeting of the Construction and Utilities Divisions.

Asplundh Tree Expert Co. indicated that during the reporting period it provided abatement assistance
to mitigate hazards.

2e. VPP-Focused Activities (if performed, provide the following total)
Partners actively seeking VPP participation 1
Applications submitted in 2008 0
VPP participants approved in 2008 3
Comments/Explanations (briefly describe activities, or explain if activity provided for but not performed)
During 2008, three companies within the MYR Group were approved for Star Level in the Mobile Workforce Demonstration for Construction.

L.E. Meyers Company, Chattanooga, TN was approved for Star Level in the Mobile Workforce Demonstration for Construction on September 29, 2008. L.E. Meyers Company’s TCIR rate for the period of 2005 - 2007 was 2.1 and is 64 percent below the 2006 Bureau of Labor Statistics’ (BLS) industry averages for NAICS 237130. Also, the company DART rate, during the same period was 1.1, which is 66 percent below the 2006 BLS industry averages for NAICS code 237130.

Sturgeon Electric Commercial and Industrial Group, Henderson, CO was approved for Star Level in the Mobile Workforce Demonstration for Construction on August 14, 2008. Sturgeon Electric’s TCIR rate for the period 2005 -2007 was 2.6, which is 55 percent below the 2006 BLS industry averages for NAICS 238210. Sturgeon Electric’s DART rate during the same period was 1.4, which is 48 percent below the 2006 BLS industry averages for NAICS 238210.

Sturgeon Electric Transmission and Distribution Group, Henderson, CO was also approved for Star Level in the Mobile Workforce Demonstration for Construction on August 14, 2008. Sturgeon Electric’s TCIR for the period 2005 – 2007 was 3.1, which is 47 percent below the 2006 BLS industry averages for NAICS 238210. Sturgeon Electric’s DART during the same period was 1.5, which is 53 percent below the 2006 BLS industry averages for NAICS 238210.
 
2f. OSHA Enforcement Activity (if performed, provide the following totals for any programmed, unprogrammed, and verification-related inspections)
OSHA enforcement inspections conducted 98
OSHA enforcement inspections in compliance 73
OSHA enforcement inspection with violations cited 25
Number of citations classified as Serious, Repeat, and Willful 0.17*
Comments/Explanations (briefly describe activities, or explain if activity provided for but not performed)
This section includes inspections conducted at each of the six signatory contractors and their subsidiaries. For information on the subsidiaries, please see Attachment A.

During 2008, the OSP participating contractors experienced 8 industry-related fatalities. The causes for these fatalities break down as follows: 3 electrocutions from contact, 4 struck-by, and 1 trench collapse.

The average number of Serious, Repeat, and Willful violations per enforcement inspection in 2008 was 0.17, a reduction when compared to the average of 0.26 in 2007. The OSP is further reviewing causes of the fatalities and discussing potential training which could be developed to address these issues in 2009.

* This data is preliminary as some of the citation/violation numbers and classifications may change due to casefile settlement. Data related to open inspections is not publicly releasable.
 
2g. Offsite Verification (if performed provide the following total)
Offsite verifications performed 1
Comments/Explanations (briefly describe activities, or explain if activity provided for but not performed)
Offsite Verifications are not required by the OSP.

2h. Onsite Non-Enforcement Verification (if performed, provide the following total)
Onsite non-enforcement verifications performed 0
Comments/Explanations (briefly describe activities, or explain if activity provided for but not performed)
The OSP does not track this information.
 
2i. Participant Self-Inspections (if performed provide the following totals)
Self-inspections performed 0
Hazards and/or violations identified and corrected/abated 0
Comments/Explanations (briefly describe activities, or explain if activity provided for but not performed)
The OSP does not track this information.

2j. Other Activities (briefly describe other activities performed)
None reported.


Section 3 - Illness and Injury Information

Year Hours Total Cases TCIR # of Days Away from Work Restricted and Transferred Activity Cases DART
2004 46,148,062 1,071 4.64 670 2.90
2005 52,395,866 1,347 5.18 840 3.21
2006 55,907,278 1,419 5.08 812 2.90
2007 57,026,819 1,235 4.33 626 2.20
2008 56,474,272 1,142 4.04 511 1.81
Total
Sites Five-Year Rate (2004-2008) 4.7 2.6
BLS Average for YR: 2008 4.0 2.4
SIC:1623 NAICS:237130

Comments
The Data Task Team (Task Team I) reviewed all industry fatality information and updated the baseline data accordingly. Task Team I also compiled TCIR, DART and fatality information for the participating companies.

The OSHA and ET&D OSP continues to benefit through a continual decrease in fatalities by the participating employers. The OSP participating employers saw a 12 percent decrease in its fatality rate between 2007 and 2008. This result is consistent with the 12 percent average decrease in fatality rate each year from 2004 to 2008 for OSP participating employers.

In addition, another measure of the OSP’s performance can be found in the comparison of OSP participating employers’ TCIR and DART rates to those of the Utility Construction Industry NAICS 237130 as reported by BLS. The chart above reflects the OSP participating employers’ overall TCIR and DART rates from 2004 to 2008. During the five year period the OSP participating employers’ TCIR declined by almost 13 percent and the DART rate declined by more than 37 percent. The OSP participating employers’ TCIR was one percent above the BLS average for 2008 while their DART was 25 percent below the BLS average for the industry.

Between 2007 and 2008, OSP participating employers realized a seven percent decrease in TCIR while the industry as a whole saw an 18 percent decrease. This result compares to a five-year average decrease in TCIR of three percent for the OSP participants while the industry experienced an average in TCIR of 9.3 percent.

The OSP participating employers DART rate saw an 18 percent decrease between 2007 and 2008 versus the industry average decrease of 17 percent over the same period. The OSP participating employers achieved an 11 percent decrease in the DART each year from 2004 to 2008 while the industry reduced its DART by an average of 7 percent between 2004 and 2008.

 
Section 4 - Partnership Plans, Benefits, and Recommendations
 
Changes and Challenges (check all applicable)
  Changes Challenges
Management Structure    
Participants    
Data Collection X X
Employee Involvement   X
OSHA Enforcement Inspections
Partnership Outreach    
Training   X
Other (specify)    
Comments
There were challenges in obtaining complete and timely submission of data/information from OSP participants in all OSP required areas. For example, there were challenges related to the submission of injury and illness data by some of the participating companies. The timely submission of data will be addressed as a goal in 2009 by Task Team 1.

The OSP partners reported a need to increase employee involvement in the safety and health process in order to promote a safety and health culture change in the ET&D industry. The OSP participants anticipate the planned wider distribution of the OSP’s training efforts and the development and implementation of the Best Practices documents will have a positive impact on the level of employee involvement.
 
Plans to Improve (check all applicable)  
  Improvements N/A
Meet more often    
Improve data collection X  
Conduct more training X  
Change goals    
Comments  
OSHA will work with OSP participants to secure complete and timely submission of data/information from OSP participants in all OSP required areas in 2009.

The OSP participating employers should continue to involve employees in the implementation and development of SHMS. The OSP participants should also enhance dissemination of the Best Practices documents in 2009. This wider distribution would assist the OSP in having enhanced industry impact.

The OSP should explore efforts to expand availability and implementation of the ET&D industry-specific 10 Hour Outreach Training Program course to non-partner companies and pursue efforts to utilize OSHA’s Education Training Centers as venues to offer the training and thereby expand its reach.
 
Partnership Benefits (check all applicable)
Increased safety and health awareness X
Improved relationship with OSHA X
Improved relationship with employers X
Improved relationship with employees or unions X
Increased number of participants
Other (specify)
Comments
The OSHA and ET&D OSP continues to reap benefits through a continual decrease in fatalities by the participating employers. For example, the participating employers saw a 12 percent decrease in its fatality rate between 2007 and 2008. In addition, between 2007 and 2008, OSP participating employers realized a seven percent decrease in TCIR while the industry saw an 18 percent decrease and OSP participating employers realized an 18 percent decrease in DART rate while the industry experienced a decrease of 17 percent.

The OSP continues to have a positive impact on the participating employers’ efforts to promote a safety and health culture change in the ET&D industry. The ongoing development and update of OSP participant developed and dissemination of Best Practices documents and training has had a positive impact on the OSP participants’ efforts to achieve the agreement’s goals.

Further, the OSP’s unique management structure, which encourages worker involvement at all levels of the partner organizations from the CEOs to the linemen has been crucial to the success of the agreement. ET&D industry workers benefit from the increased visibility of management supporting the OSP’s safety and health efforts.
 
Status Recommendation
Partnership Completed  
Continue/Renew X
Continue with the following provisions:  
Based on the successes of the OSHA and ET&D OSP, the group will develop a renewal OSP agreement in 2010.
Terminate (provide explanation)  

 
Attachment A

Company Subsidiary City, State
Asplundh Tree Expert Co.
Asplundh Tree Expert Co. Asplundh Tree Expert Co. Willow Grove, PA (HQ)
Belleville, MI (also IA and MN)
Birmingham, AL
Buford, GA
Cypress, CA
Edwards, IL
Harrington, DE
Millersville, MD (Distribution)
Millersville, MD (Transmission)
Romulus, MI
St. Louis, MO
Tolland, CT
West Palm Beach, FL
  Blume Tree Services, Inc.
UtiliCon Solutions, Ltd
Utility Tree Service, Inc.
Utility Tree Service, Inc.
Memphis, TN
Willow Grove, PA
Redding, CA
Creswell, OR
Henkels & McCoy, Inc
Henkels & McCoy, Inc Henkels & McCoy, Inc Blue Bell, PA (HQ)
InfraSource, Inc. (owned by Quanta Services, Inc.)
InfraSource, Inc. InfraSource, Inc.
M. J. Electric, LLC
InfraSource Dashiell
InfraSource Transmission Services
InfraSource Underground Services
Media, PA (HQ)
Iron Mountain, MI
Houston, TX
Kansas City, MO
Glen Ellyn, IL
MDU Construction Services Group, Inc
MDU Construction Services Group, Inc MDU Construction Services Group, Inc
Capital Electric Line Builders
Hamlin Electric Company
International Line Builders, Inc.
Lone Mountain Excavating & Utilities
Loy Clark Pipeline Company
Pouk & Steinle, Inc.
Rocky Mountain Contractors, Inc.
Bismarck, N.D. (HQ)
Kansas City, MO
Ft. Morgan, CO
Tualatin, OR
Las Vegas, NV
Tualatin, OR
Riverside, CA
Helena, MT
Company Subsidiary City, State
MYR Group Inc.
MYR Group Inc. MYR Group Inc.
L.E. Myers Co.
L.E. Myers Co.
L.E. Myers Co. VPP Star Level
L.E. Myers Co.
L.E. Myers Co.
L.E. Myers Co.
L.E. Myers Co.
L.E. Myers Co.
L.E. Myers Co.
Hawkeye Construction, Inc.
Sturgeon Electric VPP Star Level
Sturgeon Electric
Sturgeon Electric
Sturgeon Electric
Sturgeon Electric
Harlan Electric Company
Harlan Electric Company
Harlan Electric Company
Great Southwestern Construction, Inc.
Great Southwestern Construction, Inc.
Great Southwestern Construction, Inc.
Rolling Meadows, IL (HQ)
Apopka, FL
Brookfield, WI
Chattanooga, TN
Decatur, IL
Indianapolis, IN
Marshalltown, IA
Rural Hall, NC
Pasadena, TX
Worthington, MN
Troutdale, OR
Henderson, CO
Tucson, AZ
Tempe, AZ
Tempe, AZ
Salt Lake City, UT
Carlisle, PA
Methuen, MA
Rochester Hills, MI
Castle Rock, CO
Ellenwood, GA
El Paso, TX
MYR Group Inc.
Pike Electric, Inc. Pike Electric, Inc. Mount Airy, NC (HQ)
Austin, TX
Beaumont, TX
Birmingham, AL
Charlotte, NC
Cincinnati, OH
Dallas, TX
Fort Meyers, FL
Hammond, LA
Johnson City, TN
Louisville, KY
Manassas, VA
Monroe, GA
Raleigh, NC
San Antonio, TX
Tulsa, OK
Weslaco, TX
Quanta Services, Inc.
Quanta Services, Inc.

*Recent acquisitions
Arby Construction, Inc.
Blair Park Sunesys*
Canfer Construction*
Croce Electric Company, Inc.
Dillard Smith Construction Company
Golden State Utility*
H. L. Chapman Companies*
IFS Underground*
Intermountain Electric, Inc.
IRBY Construction Company
Manuel Brothers, Inc.*
Mears Group*
M. J. Electric*
North Houston Pole Line, Inc.
Northern Line Layers, Inc.
P.D.G. Electric Company
PAR Electrical Contractors, Inc.
Pauley Construction, Inc.*
Potelco, Inc.
Professional Teleconcepts*
Parkside Utility Construction Company
R.A. Waffensmith & Company, Inc.
Realtime Utility Engineers*
Seaward Corporation
The Ryan Company, Inc.
Trawick Construction Company*
Underground Construction Co., Inc.
West Coast Communications*
World Fiber, Inc.
New Berlin WI
Warrington, PA
Dallas, TX
Everett, MA
Chattanooga, TN
Turlock, CA
Leander, TX
TBD
Denver, CO
Jackson, MS
Grass Valley, CA
Rosebush, MI
Iron Mountain, MI
Houston, TX
Billings, MT
Palmetto, FL
Kansas City, MO (HQ)
Phoenix, AZ
Sumner, WA
Norwich, NY
Johnston, RI
Franktown, CO
Madison, WI
Kittery, MA
Taunton, MA
Chipley, FL
Benicia, CA
Upland, CA
Flat Rock, NC