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Construction IndustryStep 2: Other OSHA Requirements That May Apply to Your Jobsite

In addition to the OSHA requirements covered in Step 1, a number of other OSHA standards may apply to your jobsite. The following items can help you identify other key OSHA standards that may apply and point you to information to help you comply with those standards.

  1. Hazard Communication Standard. This standard is designed to ensure that employers and employees know about hazardous chemicals in the workplace and how to protect themselves. Employers with employees who may be exposed to hazardous chemicals in the workplace must prepare and implement a written Hazard Communication Program and comply with other requirements of the standard, including providing Safety Data Sheets, training, and labeling.
  2. Hand and Power Tools. Hand and power tools are common at nearly every construction jobsite.
  3. Do you use concrete or masonry products on your jobsite?
  4. Do you use cranes, derricks, hoists, elevators, or conveyors on your jobsite?
  5. Do you conduct welding, cutting, or brazing at your jobsite?
  6. Are you engaged in residential construction?
  7. Are you engaged in steel erection?
  8. Fire Safety and Emergency Action Planning. Construction employers are responsible for the development and maintenance of an effective fire protection and prevention program at the jobsite throughout all phases of the construction, repair, alteration, or demolition work. (29 CFR 1926.24). OSHA recommends that all employers have an emergency action plan. A plan is mandatory when required by an OSHA standard. (29 CFR 1926.35). An emergency action plan describes the actions employees should take to ensure their safety in a fire or other emergency situation.
  9. Hazard Communication Standard. This standard is designed to ensure that employers and employees know about hazardous chemicals in the workplace and how to protect themselves. Employers with employees who may be exposed to hazardous chemicals in the workplace must prepare and implement a written Hazard Communication Program and comply with other requirements of the standard, including providing Material Data Safety Sheets, training, and labeling.

This list is not comprehensive - additional OSHA standards may apply to your workplace. In addition, section 5(a)(1) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act, known as the General Duty Clause, requires employers to provide their employees with a workplace that is free of recognized hazards likely to cause death or serious physical harm. Be sure to review OSHA's construction standards (29 CFR 1926) for requirements that may apply to your workplace.

  • You may review and print FREE copies of OSHA's construction standards from OSHA's Website. You may also order bound volumes of the standards from the Government Printing Office (GPO) at (866) 512-1800 or from GPO's website.
  • An OSHA booklet summarizes OSHA construction standards that are most frequently overlooked by employers and standards that cover particularly hazardous situations.Construction Industry Digest. OSHA Publication 2202-09R, (2011).
  • The OSHA Construction Resource Manual includes links to the relevant mandatory standards for construction work that have been codified in OSHA's standards, including 29 CFR Parts 1903, 1904, 1910, and 1926.
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