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Illinois Health Care Association

 

ILLINOIS HEALTH CARE ASSOCIATION
An Illinois Alliance
ANNUAL & CLOSE OUT ALLIANCE REPORT
December 30, 2009


  1. Alliance Background

    Date Signed:

    December 11, 2006 - Alliance term 3 years

    Alliance Overview

    Alliance to provide IHCA members and others with information, guidance, and access to training resources that will help them protect employees' health and safety, particularly in reducing and preventing exposure to blood, ergonomic, chemical, electrical and physical hazards and for the implementation of effective safety and health programs.

    Implementation Team Members

    Debbie Belt
    Director of Training, IHCA
    Brian Bothast
    Peoria OSHA office
  2. Implementation Team Meetings

    On January 5, 2009, Debbie Belt and Brian organized and finalized the January half day training sessions.

    On January 21, 2009, Brian met with Debbie Belt to address the activities for the remainder of the year.

  3. Activities and Products

    Evaluation Period

    This report covers December 11, 2008 through December 11, 2008

    Alliance Activity

    On January 20, 2009, Nancy Quick provided a presentation near Chicago addressing the IHCA and OSHA Alliance, the OSHA recordkeeping requirements, ergonomic hazards and the OSHA general duty clause, the personal protective equipment standard and the new requirements, common violations of the bloodborne pathogens standard, slip, trip and fall hazards and effective controls, electrical hazards, lead and hexavalent chrome exposure in the healthcare environment, chemical hazards and the hazard communication standard, emergency preparedness, OSHA's pandemic flu guidelines, the elements of an effective safety and health program, the Voluntary Protection Program, and a question and answer session.

    On January 21, 2009, Brian Bothast provided a presentation in Springfield, Illinois, addressing the IHCA and OSHA Alliance, the OSHA recordkeeping requirements, ergonomic hazards and the OSHA general duty clause, the personal protective equipment standard and the new requirements, common violations of the bloodborne pathogens standard, slip, trip and fall hazards and effective controls, electrical hazards, lead and hexavalent chrome exposure in the healthcare environment, chemical hazards and the hazard communication standard, emergency preparedness, OSHA's pandemic flu guidelines, the elements of an effective safety and health program, the Voluntary Protection Program, and a question and answer session.

    On January 22, 2009, Brian Bothast provided a presentation in Mt. Vernon, Illinois, addressing the IHCA and OSHA Alliance, the OSHA recordkeeping requirements, ergonomic hazards and the OSHA general duty clause, the personal protective equipment standard and the new requirements, common violations of the bloodborne pathogens standard, slip, trip and fall hazards and effective controls, electrical hazards, lead and hexavalent chrome exposure in the healthcare environment, chemical hazards and the hazard communication standard, emergency preparedness, OSHA's pandemic flu guidelines, the elements of an effective safety and health program, the Voluntary Protection Program, and a question and answer session.

    In January 2009, Brian submitted an application to speak at the IHCA conference in September 2009, in Peoria, Illinois.

    On September 15, 2009, Brian provided a training session at the IHCA conference in Peoria, Illinois, addressing OSHA inspections, effective safety and health programs, bloodborne pathogens, hazard communication, lockout, personal protective equipment, electrical hazards, emergency action, the OSHA recordkeeping requirements, respiratory protection, and the pandemic flu guidelines.

    Alliance Products

    Handouts were provided for participants at the training sessions and the conference. addressing information on the OSHA recordkeeping requirements, lockout, emergency preparedness, and other topics.

  4. Results

    Type of Activity

    Number of Individuals Reached or Trained

    Half day Alliance and Compliance Training near Chicago

    30

    Half day Alliance and Compliance Training in Springfield, IL

    20

    Half day Alliance and Compliance Training in Mt. Vernon, IL

    20

    IHCA Annual Conference - Peoria, IL

    45 participants

    TOTAL

    115

  5. Upcoming Milestones

    Brian Bothast has completed a call for presentations for the IHCA conference in September 2010, and should hear if he was accepted in May, 2010.

    There are no plans to renew the alliance at this time.

Report prepared by: Brian Bothast

Emergency Action Checklist

Action

Standard

Yes/No

Are all exits unobstructed and is the path to an exit at least 28 inches wide at all points?

1910.36

 
Are all exits marked by an exit sign with lettering that is at least 5 inches high and illuminated by a reliable light source?

1910.37(b)

 
Are doors or passageways that are not an exit, but could be mistaken as an exit, marked as "NOT AN EXIT," or its actual character?

1910.37(b)(5)

 
Has the employer developed a written emergency action plan for emergencies such as fires or tornados?

1910.38(b)

 
Does the plan include procedures for reporting a fire or other emergency? (i.e. manual pull box, public address, radio or telephone)

1910.38(c)(1)

 
Does the employer provide a distinctive and recognizable alarm system capable of being perceived above ambient noise or light levels to alert employees of need for emergency action?

1910.165(b)

 
Does the plan include procedures for emergency evacuation and exit route assignments?

1910.38(c)(2)

 
Does the plan include procedures to be followed by employees who remain to operate critical plant operations before they evacuate?

1910.38(c)(3)

 
Does the plan include procedures to account for all employees after evacuation?

1910.38(c)(4)

 
Does the plan include procedures to be followed by employees performing rescue or medical duties?

1910.38(c)(5)

 
Does the plan include the name of the person who may be contacted by employees who need more information about the plan?

1910.38(c)(6)

 

Has an emergency response plan been developed and implemented to handle anticipated emergencies?

Emergency response is a response by employees from outside the immediate area to an uncontrolled release of a hazardous substance.

1910.120(q)(1)

 
Do employees engaged in an emergency response to a hazardous substance, presenting a potential inhalation hazard, wear positive pressure self-contained breathing apparatus, until air monitoring indicates a decreased level of respiratory protection is adequate?

1910.120(q)(3)(iv)

 
Is emergency care available at the worksite from a designated member of the workforce trained in first aid or a trained emergency service provider and available within 3-4 minutes?

1910.151(b)

 
Is there an eye-wash that will provide a continuous flow of water to both eyes for at least 15 minutes within 50 feet or ten seconds of an area where corrosive liquids or materials are handled?

1910.151(c)

 
When portable fire extinguishers are available for employee use, has the employer provided an (annual) educational program for each user on the general principles of fire extinguisher use and the hazards of incipient stage fire fighting or informed employees that they are not allowed to use the fire extinguishers and are required to evacuate?

1910.157(g)(1)

 
Have all employees who are expected to respond to medical emergencies as part of their job responsibilities had the hepatitis B vaccination made available to them and been trained to understand how to use the PPE to protect against bloodborne diseases?

1910.1030

 
Are employees trained in first aid and identified by the employer as responsible for rendering medical assistance as part of his/her job duties provided bloodborne pathogens training?

1910.1030(g)(2)

 
Hazard Assessment
Personal Protective Equipment Certification
OSHA 29CFR1910.132(d)(2)

Facility Name: __________________________________________________

Location/Department: ____________________________________________

Date/Revision: __________________________________________________

Task

Hazard

PPE

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

Person completing assessment: ________________________________________________

Exceptions for work-related injury or illness

1904.5(b)(2)

You are not required to record injuries and illnesses if . . .

(i) At the time of the injury or illness, the employee was present in the work environment as a member of the general public rather than as an employee.
(ii) The injury or illness involves signs or symptoms that surface at work but result solely from a non-work-related event or exposure that occurs outside the work environment.
(iii) The injury or illness results solely from voluntary participation in a wellness program or in a medical, fitness, or recreational activity such as blood donation, physical examination, flu shot, exercise class, racquetball, or baseball.
(iv)

The injury or illness is solely the result of an employee eating, drinking, or preparing food or drink for personal consumption (whether bought on the employer's premises or brought in). For example, if the employee is injured by choking on a sandwich while in the employer's establishment, the case would not be considered work-related.

Note: If the employee is made ill by ingesting food contaminated by workplace contaminants (such as lead), or gets food poisoning from food supplied by the employer, the case would be considered work-related.

(v) The injury or illness is solely the result of an employee doing personal tasks (unrelated to their employment) at the establishment outside of the employee's assigned working hours.
(vi) The injury or illness is solely the result of personal grooming, self-medication for a non-work-related condition, or is intentionally self-inflicted.
(vii) The injury or illness is caused by a motor vehicle accident and occurs on a company parking lot or company access road while the employee is commuting to or from work.
(viii) The illness is the common cold or flu (Note: contagious diseases such as tuberculosis, brucellosis, hepatitis A, or plague are considered work-related if the employee is infected at work).
(ix) The illness is a mental illness. Mental illness will not be considered work-related unless the employee voluntarily provides the employer with an opinion from a physician or other licensed health care professional with appropriate training and experience (psychiatrist, psychologist, psychiatric nurse practitioner, etc.) stating that the employee has a mental illness that is work-related.
Complete list of all treatments considered first aid
1904.7(b)(5)(ii) "First aid" means the following . . .
A Using a non-prescription medication at nonprescription strength (for medications available in both prescription and non-prescription form, a recommendation by a physician or other licensed health care professional to use a non-prescription medication at prescription strength is considered medical treatment for recordkeeping purposes)
B Administering tetanus immunizations (other immunizations, such as Hepatitis B vaccine or rabies vaccine, are considered medical treatment)
C Cleaning, flushing or soaking wounds on the surface of the skin;
D Using wound coverings such as bandages, Band-Aids™, gauze pads, etc.; or using butterfly bandages or Steri-Strips™ (other wound closing devices such as sutures, staples, etc., are considered medical treatment);
E Using hot or cold therapy;
F Using any non-rigid means of support, such as elastic bandages, wraps, non-rigid back belts, etc. (devices with rigid stays or other systems designed to immobilize parts of the body are considered medical treatment for recordkeeping purposes)
G Using temporary immobilization devices while transporting an accident victim (e.g., splints, slings, neck collars, back boards, etc.)
H Drilling of a fingernail or toenail to relieve pressure, or draining fluid from a blister;
I Using eye patches
J Removing foreign bodies from the eye using only irrigation or a cotton swab
K Removing splinters or foreign material from areas other than the eye by irrigation, tweezers, cotton swabs or other simple means;
L Using finger guards;
M Using massages (physical therapy or chiropractic treatment are considered medical treatment for recordkeeping purposes); or
N Drinking fluids for relief of heat stress
Periodic Lockout Inspection - 1910.147(c)(6) Yes/No
Have you completed an inspection of all of your lockout procedures in the last 12 months?  
Did an authorized employee other than user of procedure complete the lockout inspection?  
Did the inspector and the authorized employees review the employee's responsibilities?  
Did the inspector identify any deviations or inadequacies?  
Did someone take action to correct all of the inadequacies and improve the lockout program?  
Does the Annual lockout Program review documentation include a list of machines and employees included in the inspection, the dates of the inspection, and name of the inspector?  

Signature: ________________________________________________ Date: ____________

Lockout Inspection Documentation
Date of Inspection
Name of Inspector

Inspector reviewed
lockout procedure with . . .
[Name(s) of employee(s)]


 

Machine(s) addressed

Lockout procedure
deviations or inadequacies


Who is responsible for
taking corrective action


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