Alliance -- An OSHA Cooperative Program<< Back to Concluded Alliances - Region V



  1. Alliance Background

    Date Signed.

    March 4, 2009

    Alliance Overview:

    The alliance will provide the Greater Peoria Contractors & Suppliers Association members and others with information, guidance and access to training resources that will help protect employees, particularly by improving hazard recognition and methods to control hazards related to electricity, noise, silica, ladders, and ergonomic risk factors.

    Implementation Team Members

    The Implementation Team Members include Brian Bothast, Peoria OSHA offices Compliance Assistance Specialist; Dana Oaks, Executive Director of the Greater Peoria Contractors & Suppliers Association and Nancy Crain-Brown, Office Manager.

  2. Implementation Team Meetings

    On May 26, 2010, Brian Bothast met with Greater Peoria Contractors & Suppliers Association to develop a suitable action plan for the alliance. The group agreed to make arrangements for the facilities and promote the training sessions. The group agreed to continue to participate as a sponsor for the Downstate Illinois Occupational Safety and Health Conference.

  3. Activities and Products

    Evaluation Period

    The evaluation period was from March 4, 2010 to April 15, 2011.

    Alliance Activity

    On November 17, 2010, Brian Bothast (CAS) provided part of a presentation on lead in construction and developed a hazard control worksheet as part of the training session for contractors. Brian provided a help sheet to ensure each participant could review their own program when they returned to their facility.

    On December 10, 2010, Brian Bothast (CAS) provided a training session addressing the hazard communication standard requirements and upcoming Global Harmonization. All participants were provided a Hazard Communication help sheet. On January 14, 2011, Brian Bothast (CAS) provided a training session addressing the OSHA recordkeeping requirements and the National Emphasis program.

    On February 11, 2011, Brian Bothast (CAS) provided a training session addressing appropriate safety and health programs, hazard assessments, eye protection, hand protection, foot protection, head protections, electrical protective equipment, hearing protection and related topics.

    On February 25, 2011, Brian provided part of an OSHA 30-hour training class for GPCSA members addressing effective safety and health programs, the OSHA national and local emphasis programs and answered a wide variety of questions for the participants.

    On March 2, 2011, the Greater Peoria Contractors & Suppliers Association participated in the Downstate Illinois Occupational Safety and Health Conference acting as a liaison between the Peoria Civic Center and the co-sponsors to ensure the facilities were appropriate, meals were served, and managing issues for participants during the event.

    On March 25, 2011, Brian provided a training session on the new crane standard. Brian addressed requirements for ground conditions, electrical, rigging, signaling, inspections, fall and struck by hazards, maintenance, recordkeeping, training and certification.

    On April 15, 2011, Brian provided a training session on the changes to the residential fall protection guidelines and covered the OSHA requirements for a fall protection plan. A checklist was provided to assist participants.

    Alliance Products

    As part of the alliance, Brian developed a Lead Exposure in Construction help sheet. Participants at the session were each provided the help sheet and feedback at the session indicated they thought the help sheet was useful in assisting their understanding of the OSHA lead standard.

    Brian developed a Hazard Communication Compliance help sheet. The checklist was developed with a small employer in mind in an effort to ensure they understood their responsibilities for implementing an effective hazard communication program and met the most commonly violated OSHA 1910.1200 standards.

    Brian developed a help sheet for the new crane standard to assist construction firms with a variety of aspects of the new crane standard.

    Brian developed a fall protection plan checklist and a fall hazard identification help sheet to assist workers in identifying fall hazards in the field and in the shop.

    Brian developed an Emergency Action Checklist that addressed the common related issues and the applicable OSHA standards for facility and shop hazards.

  4. Results

    1. Impact of the Alliance activities and products The Peoria Area OSHA Office was able to address significant safety and health topics with the managers and decision makers of Greater Peoria Contractors & Suppliers Association companies at a time of the year when construction activity is diminished. The Greater Peoria Contractors & Suppliers Association provided all of the publicity and facilities for the sessions. OSHAs participation allowed the Agency to reach effected managers and workers and assist them in understanding the OSHA requirements for a wide variety of topics.

      The Greater Peoria Contractors & Suppliers Association participated as a sponsor of the Downstate Illinois Occupational Safety and Health Conference.

      Each member of the Greater Peoria Contractors & Suppliers Association was provided a copy of the Emergency Action Checklist and asked to take action on any item that did not meet the OSHA requirements to protect their personnel and facilities.

      The Greater Peoria Contractors & Suppliers Association indicated they were very pleased with the alliance and received numerous positive comments about the training sessions.


    2. Activity and the number of individuals reached or trained.

    OSHA Training Sessions


    Date

    Topic

    Participants

     

    November 17, 2010

     

    Brian provided a presentation and lead in construction hazard control worksheet as part of a training session for contractors.  The session also addressed the new EPA rule and enforcement in the state of Illinois

    30

     

    December 10, 2010

     

    Brian provided a training session addressing the hazard communication standard requirements and upcoming Global Harmonization.  Brian provided a help sheet to ensure each participant could review their program at their facility.  Brian also answered a wide variety of OSHA related questions for the group.

    25

     

    January 14, 2011

    Brian provided a training session addressing the OSHA recordkeeping requirements and the National Emphasis program.  Brian also answered a wide variety of questions

    12

     

     

    February 11, 2011

     

    Brian provided a presentation addressing appropriate safety and health programs, hazard assessments, eye protection, hand protection, foot protection, head protections, electrical protective equipment, hearing protection and related topics.

    20

     

    February 25, 2011

     

    Brian provided part of an OSHA 30-hour training class addressing effective safety and health programs, the OSHA national and local emphasis programs and answering a wide variety of questions for the participants.

    25

     

    March 2, 2011

    Downstate Illinois Occupational Safety and Health Conference.

    500

    March 25, 2011

     

    Brian provided a training session on the new crane standard.  Brian addressed requirements for ground conditions, electrical, rigging, signaling, inspections, fall and struck by hazards, maintenance, recordkeeping, training and certification

    25

    April 15, 2011

    Brian provided a training session on the changes to the residential fall protection guidelines. 

    30

     

    Total participation

    667


  5. Upcoming Milestones Alliance completed and closed.

    Report prepared by: Brian Bothast

    Lead exposure in Construction help sheet

    Question if monitoring not completed

    Standard

    Yes/No

    If air monitoring has not been completed, did the employer ensure the use of appropriate respiratory protection for the task as listed by the standard?

    1926.62(d)(2)(v)(A)

     

    If air monitoring has not been completed, did the employer ensure the use of personal protective clothing and equipment in accordance with section (g) of the standard?

    1926.62(d)(2)(v)(B)

     

    If air monitoring has not been completed, did the employer provide change areas in accordance with paragraph (i)(2) of the standard?

    1926.62(d)(2)(v)(C)

     

    If air monitoring has not been completed, did the employer provide hand washing facilities in accordance with paragraph (i)(5) of the standard.

    1926.62(d)(2)(v)(D)

     

    If air monitoring has not been completed, did the employer provide biological monitoring consisting of blood sampling and analysis for lead and zinc protoporphyrin?

    1926.62(d)(2)(v)(E)

     

    If air monitoring has not been completed, did the employer provide training as required by the lead standard, hazard communication, respirator training and site specific training as required 1926.21.

    1926.62(d)(2)(v)(F)

     

    Are workers involved in spray painting with lead paint, manual demolition, scraping, sanding, and similar operations of lead coatings or paint treated as if they were exposed above the PEL, but not more than ten times the PEL and have the employee protective measures described in (d)(2)(v) been implemented until two consecutive air samples 7 days apart show exposures are able to be maintained below the PEL?

    1926.62(d)(2)(i)

     

    Are workers rivet busting, using lead containing mortar, conducting power tool cleaning without dust collection systems, or conducting cleanup of abrasive blasting materials where lead coatings or paint are present treated as if they were exposed to lead in excess of 500 ug/m3 and have the employee protective measures in (d)(2)(v) been implemented?

    1926.62(d)(2)(iii)

     

    Are workers involved in abrasive blasting, welding, cutting, or torch burning treated as if they were exposed to lead in excess of 2500 ug/m3 and have the employee protective measures in (d)(2)(v) been implemented?

    1926.62(d)(2)(iv)

     

    Prior to commencement of a job with lead, did the employer implement a written compliance program?

    1926.62(e)(2)(i)

     

    Did the employer collect air samples for each job and task in each work area with the highest exposure?

    1926.62(d)(1)(iii)

     

    Did the employer continue air monitoring until at least two consecutive measurements, taken at least 7 days apart, are below the action level of 30 ug/m3?

    1926.62(d)(6)(ii)

     

    Is the employer relying on sample data obtained within a year that closely resembles the process, material, control methods, work practices, and environmental conditions prevailing during previous air sampling?

    1926.62(d)(3)(iii)

     

    Did the employer implement a comprehensive respiratory protection program?

    1926.62(f)(2)(i)

     

    Did the employer provide and require the use of coveralls or similar full-body work clothing; gloves, hats, shoes or disposable shoe coverlets; and face shields, vented goggles, or other appropriate eye protection?

    1926.62(g)(1)

     

    Did the employer provide the PPE in a clean and dry condition weekly, and daily to employees whose exposure without regard to respirators are over 200 ug/m3?

    1926.62(g)(2)(i)

     

    Did the employer assure that food, beverages, & tobacco products are not present or consumed in the area?

    1926.62(i)(1)

     

    Did the employer assure that change areas are equipped with separate storage for work clothing and equipment and for street clothes to prevent cross-contamination.

    1926.62(i)(2)(ii)

     

    Did the employer assure that employees do not leave the work wearing any contaminated clothing or equipment?

    1926.62(i)(2)(iii)

     

    Did the employer assure shower facilities, cleansing agents and towels are provided & used each shift?

    1926.62(i)(3)(ii)

     

    Did the employer train each employee exposed to lead on the OSHA lead standard and appendices; operations that  could result in exposure to lead; the purpose, fitting, use, and limitations of respirators; the purpose and a description of the medical surveillance program, and the medical removal requirements including the adverse health effects associated with exposure to lead; engineering controls and work practices to follow; any compliance plan in effect; instructions about chelating agents; and the employee's right to access medical and exposure records?

    1926.62(l)(1)(ii)

     


    Please take action to address any question you answered no or I dont know.

    Hazard Communication Compliance Help Sheet

    Standard Requirement

     

    Yes / No

    Do you have a written hazard communication program with procedures to ensure containers of hazardous chemicals are labeled, material safety data sheets are available, non-routine tasks are addressed, the required training is completed, and a process is implemented for multi-employer workplaces?

     

    Is there a comprehensive list of all hazardous chemicals at the site?

     

    Is there a label on each container indicating the chemical identity and the appropriate hazard warning?

     

    Is a material safety data sheet always available?

     

    Were employees informed of operations in their work area where hazardous chemicals are present at the time of their initial assignment, and whenever a new physical or health hazard that the employees had not previously been trained about is introduced into their work area?

     

    Are employees informed of the location and availability of the written hazard communication program, the list of hazardous chemicals, and material safety data sheets?

     

    Did the employee training include the methods and observations that may be used to detect the presence or release of a hazardous chemical in the work area (such as monitoring conducted by the employer, continuous monitoring devices, visual appearance or odor of hazardous chemicals when being released, etc.)?

     

    Did the employee training include the physical and health hazards of the chemicals in the work area?

     

    Did the employee training include the measures employees can take to protect themselves from these hazards, including specific procedures the employer has implemented to protect employees from exposure to hazardous chemicals, such as appropriate work practices, emergency procedures, and personal protective equipment to be used?

     

    Did the employee training include the details of the hazard communication program developed by the employer, including an explanation of the labeling system, material safety data sheets, and how employees can obtain and use the appropriate hazard information?

     


    All items should be answered yes to ensure compliance with OSHA requirements.

    Crane standards you need to know!

    Issue

    Standard

    Y/N

    Did the crane controlling entity or employer that has authority at the site make ground preparations and inform the operator of the location of hazards (voids, tanks, utilities) beneath the set-up area?

    1926.1402(c)(2) 1926.1402(d)

     

    Was the crane assembled/disassembled at the direction of a person(s) who meets the criteria as a competent person and a qualified person and understands the applicable procedures?

    1926.1404(a)(1) 1926.1404(b)

     

    Before commencing assembly/disassembly operations, did the A/D Director ensure the crew understood their tasks, the hazards associated with their tasks and the hazardous positions/locations that they need to avoid?

    1926.1404(d)(1)

     

    Did the employer conduct an electrical hazard assessment and identify the work zone by demarcating boundaries (with flags, range limit device or range control warning device) and prohibit the operator from operating past the boundaries?

    1926.1408(a)(1)

     

    Did the employer determine if any part of the equipment, load line or load (including rigging and lifting accessories), if operated up to the equipment's maximum working radius in the work zone (360 degrees) could get closer than 20 feet to a power line and if so, confirm from the utility owner that the power line has been deenergized and visibly grounded, ensure that no part of the equipment, line, or load gets closer than 20 feet, or determine the line's voltage and the minimum approach distance permitted under Table A and ensure the distance is maintained.

    1926.1408(a)(2)

     

    Did the employer conduct a planning meeting with the operator and the other workers in the area of the equipment or load to review the location of the power line(s), and the steps implemented to prevent encroachment/electrocution?

    1926.1408(b)(1)

     

    Following repairs/adjustments to a safety device, operator aid, a critical part of a control system, power plant, braking system, load-sustaining structural components, load hook, or in-use operating mechanism, was the equipment inspected and functionally tested prior to use?

    1926.1412(b)(1) 1926.1412(b)(1)(iii)

     

    Whenever there is a safety concern, does the operator have the authority to stop and refuse to handle the load until a qualified person has determined it is safe?

    1926.1418

     


    The right answer to all applicable questions is yes, please take action if you answered no.

    Issue

    Standard

    Y/N

    Did a competent person conduct a visual inspection prior to each shift for maladjustments, excessive wear, proper hydraulic fluid level, contamination by lubricants, pressurized line deterioration or leakage, deformation, cracks, damage, wire rope reeving, the ground around outriggers, the level position, operator's view from the cab, safety devices and operational aids?

    1926.1412(d)(1)

     

    When any deficiency is identified, is an immediate determination made by the competent person as to whether the deficiency constitutes a safety hazard and the unit must be taken out of service?

    1926.1412(d)(2)

     

    Did the employer document the items checked and the results of the inspection, the date, the name and signature of the person who conducted the inspection and was the record maintained for a minimum of three months?

    1926.1412(e)(3)(i)

     

    Is a signal person used when the load placement and travel is not in full view of the operator or the operator or the person handling the load determines it is necessary?

    1926.1419(a)

     

    Does anyone who becomes aware of a safety problem alert the operator or signal person by giving the stop or emergency stop signal. (Note: 1926.1417(y) requires the operator to obey a stop or emergency stop signal).

    1926.1419(j)

     

    If the operator receives radio, telephone or other electronic signals, is a hands-free system used?

    1926.1420(c)

     

    Is the hand signal chart posted on the equipment or conspicuously in the vicinity of the hoisting operations?

    1926.1422

     

    Did the employer maintain documentation at the site of the signal person’s third party or employer qualification for each type of signaling (hand signals, radio, etc.) used?

    1926.1428(a)(3)

     

    Did the employer ensure that, prior to operating any equipment the person is operating the equipment is qualified or certified to operate the equipment?

    1926.1427(a)

     

    Did the employer evaluate each employee and confirm that they understand the training and provide refresher training in relevant topics when, based on the conduct of the employee or an evaluation of the employee's knowledge, there is an indication that retraining is necessary?

    1926.1430(g)(1) 1926.1430(g)(2)

     

    When more than one crane will be supporting the load, was the operation planned and did the lift director review the plan with all workers who will be involved in the operation?

    1926.1432(b)(2)

     

    Is the "rated capacity" and related information including alternate ratings for use and nonuse of outriggers, stabilizers, and extra counterweights available in the cab?

    1926.1433(d)(1) 1926.1433(d)(1)(i)(B) 

     


    The right answer to all applicable questions is yes, please take action if you answered no.
    Not all questions are applicable to every crane.

    Fall Protection Plan

     

    Standard

     

    Requirement

     

    Completed

    1926.502(k)(1)

    Has a plan been prepared by a qualified person and developed specifically for the site where the leading edge work, pre-cast concrete work, or residential construction work is being performed and maintained up to date?

     

    1926.502(k)(2)

    Are any changes to the fall protection plan approved by a qualified person?

     

    1926.502(k)(3)

    Is a copy of the fall protection plan with all approved changes maintained at the job site?

     

    1926.502(k)(4)

    Is the implementation of the fall protection plan under the supervision of a competent person?

     

    1926.502(k)(5)

    Does the fall protection plan document the reasons why the use of conventional fall protection systems (guardrails, personal fall arrest systems, or safety nets) are infeasible or why their use would create a greater hazard?

     

    1926.502(k)(6)

    Does the fall protection plan include a written discussion of other measures that will be taken to reduce or eliminate the fall hazard for workers who cannot be provided with protection from the conventional fall protection systems? (the extent to which scaffolds, ladders, or vehicle mounted work platforms can be used)

     

    1926.502(k)(7)

    Does the fall protection plan identify each location where conventional fall protection methods cannot be used and classify the locations as controlled access zones and meet the criteria in paragraph (g) of the standard?

     

    1926.502(k)(8)

    When no other measures were implemented, did you implement a safety monitoring system in conformance with 1926.502(h)?

     

    1926.502(k)(9)

    Does the fall protection plan include the names or identification of each employee designated to work in controlled access zones and prevent other employees from entering controlled access zones?

     

    1926.502(k)(10)

    In the event of an employee fall or some other serious incident, do you investigate the circumstances of the incident to determine if the fall protection plan needs to be changed (new practices, procedures, or training) and implement changes to prevent incidents?

     


    Please review your worksite for common fall hazards

    Fall hazards that need to be addressed

    Standard

    Yes or No

    Are all ladders free from damage, secured, and extend at least 3 feet above the raised surface?

    1926.1053

     

    Are all open sided work areas 4 feet or more above the adjacent surface in the shop protected by a suitable guard rail?

     

    1910.23

     

    Are all open sided work areas 6 feet or more above the adjacent surface at construction sites protected by a suitable guard rail, netting, or fall protection system? 

     

    1926.451

     

    Are all hoisting areas protected with suitable guardrails?

    1926.501
    (b)(3)

     

    Are all guard rails 42 inches high, have a mid-rail about 21 inches high, and able to support greater than 200 pounds of force applied in any direction?

     

    1926.502

     

    Are employees performing residential roofing activities on a low-sloped roof (up to 6/12 pitch) protected with a slide guard (2x6 planks secured 90 degrees to surface of roof) or better fall protection?

     

    1926.501
    (b)(13)

     

    Are all employees performing residential roofing activities on roofs with an 8/12 pitch or greater protected with a guard rail, safety net, or a suitable full body harness and lanyard?

     

    1926.501
    (b)(11)

     

    Are all employees working near sky lights protected from accidentally falling through them?

    1926.501
    (b)(4)

     

    Are all scaffolds greater than 10 feet high fully planked and assembled with a suitable guardrail?

    1926.451

     

    Are all employees operating in an aerial or boom lift required to stand firmly on the floor and wear a full body harness and lanyard attached to a suitable position in the basket?

     

    1926.453

     


    Please take action to remove workers from hazards for any negative responses

    Emergency Action Checklist

     

    Action

     

    Standard

     

    y/n

    Are all exits unobstructed and is the path to an exit at least 28 inches wide at all points?

     

    1910.36

     

    Are all exits marked by an exit sign with lettering that is at least 5 inches high and illuminated by a reliable light source??

     

    1910.37(b)

     

    Are doors or passageways that are not an exit, but could be mistaken as an exit, marked as “NOT AN EXIT,” or its actual character?

     

    1910.37(b)(5)

     

    Has the employer developed a written emergency action plan for emergencies such as fires or tornados?

     

    1910.38(b)

     

    Does the plan include procedures for reporting a fire or other emergency? (i.e. manual pull box, public address, radio or telephone)

     

    1910.38(c)(1)

     

    Does the employer provide a distinctive and recognizable alarm system capable of being perceived above ambient noise or light levels to alert employees of need for emergency action?

     

    1910.165(b)

     

    Does the plan include procedures for emergency evacuation and exit route assignments?

     

    1910.38(c)(2)

     

    Does the plan include procedures to be followed by employees who remain to operate critical plant operations before they evacuate?

     

    1910.38(c)(3)

     

    Does the plan include procedures to account for all employees after evacuation?

     

    1910.38(c)(4)

     

    Does the plan include procedures to be followed by employees performing rescue or medical duties?

     

    1910.38(c)(5)

     

    Does the plan include the name of the person who may be contacted by employees who need more information about the plan?

     

    1910.38(c)(6)

     

    Has an emergency response plan been developed and implemented to handle anticipated emergencies?
    Emergency response is a response by employees from outside the immediate area to an uncontrolled release of a hazardous substance.

     

    1910.120(q)(1)

     

    Do employees engaged in an emergency response to a hazardous substance, presenting a potential inhalation hazard, wear positive pressure self-contained breathing apparatus, until air monitoring indicates a decreased level of respiratory protection is adequate?

     

    1910.120(q)(3)(iv)

     

    Is emergency care available at the worksite from a designated member of the workforce trained in first aid or a trained emergency service provider and available within 3-4 minutes?

     

    1910.151(b)

     

    Is there an eye-wash that will provide a continuous flow of water to both eyes for at least 15 minutes within 50 feet or ten seconds of an area where corrosive liquids or materials are handled?

     

    1910.151(c)

     

    When portable fire extinguishers are available for employee use, has the employer provided an (annual) educational program for each user on the general principles of fire extinguisher use and the hazards of incipient stage fire fighting or informed employees that they are not allowed to use the fire extinguishers and are required to evacuate?

     

    1910.157(g)(1)

     

    Have all employees who are expected to respond to medical emergencies as part of their job responsibilities had the hepatitis B vaccination made available to them and been trained to understand how to use the PPE to protect against bloodborne diseases?

     

    1910.1030

     

    Are employees trained in first aid and identified by the employer as responsible for rendering medical assistance as part of his/her job duties provided bloodborne pathogens training?

     

    1910.1030(g)(2)

     


    Please take appropriate action to address any no response