Alliance -- An OSHA Cooperative Program<< Back to Region V


  1. Alliance Background
  2. Date Signed:

    May 27, 2009

    Alliance Overview.

    OSHA, Onsite Consultation and the Grain and Feed Association of Illinois (GFAI) formed an Alliance to provide the GFAI members and others with information, guidance, and access to training resources that will help them protect employees’ health and safety, particularly in reducing and preventing exposure to falls, confined space hazards, fire hazards and amputation hazards. The alliance will focus on preventing exposure to hazards related to machine guarding, lockout, slip and fall hazards, ergonomic stressors, and confined space entry.

    Implementation Team Members.

    John Lee, Grain and Feed Association of Illinois Safety Director and Brian Bothast, Peoria OSHA Office Compliance Assistance Specialist (CAS) are the primary implementation team members.

  3. Implementation Team Meetings
  4. On May 5, 2011, Brian Bothast and John Lee met to discuss the alliance and implementation for 2011-2012.

    December 15, 2012, Brian Bothast and John Lee met to discuss the alliance, the activities for 2012, and the pros and cons of continuing the alliance in the future.

    April 19, 2012, Brian Bothast and John Lee met to address the statewide partnership and to determine a future approach.

  5. Activities and Products
  6. Evaluation Period.

    May 27, 2011 to May 27, 2012 and information related to the life of the alliance.

    Alliance Activity.

    On June 23, 2011, Brian provided presentations for the alliance partners in Bloomington, Illinois, on the Region V Grain Handling emphasis program, SVEP, engulfment hazards, sweep augers, respiratory protection, fall hazards, amputation hazards, and age related work restrictions.

    On August 23, 2011, Brian provided a training session at the National Agronomic Environmental Health & Safety School and addressed information on the SVEP, effective safety and health programs, global harmonization, hazard communication, and hazards related to agri-business.

    On August 30, 31 and September 1, 2011, Brian Bothast set up and manned a booth in the safety and health tent at the National Farm Progress Show in Decatur, Illinois. Brian supplied participants with help sheets to meet the OSHA requirements for bin entry, emergency action planning, young worker rules, respiratory protection, hazard communication, and ten things all employees should know about OSHA in English and Spanish. Booklets were available at the booth on employee workplace rights, whistleblower protection, saving sudden cardiac arrest victims, amputation hazards, protection from the sun, a heat safety fact sheet, and hazards from snakes. Brian had previously developed a pictorial of hazards related to machine guarding, electrical hazards, sweep auger hazards, ladder hazards, suitable exits, excessive heat, respiratory protection, welding and cutting, and excavation hazards.

    On November 17, 2012, Brian provided a presentation for the Illinois and Indiana Grain Elevator and Processing Society in Covington, Indiana as part of the GFAI alliance. The session addressed the grain handling local emphasis program in Region V, the SVEP, amputation hazards, fall hazards, powered industrial vehicles, combustible dust, hazard communication, PPE, electrical hazards, lockout, bin entry and confined space hazards.

    April 19, 2012, Brian Bothast worked with GFAI members to address procedural issues with bin entry and preventing engulfment hazards.

    On July 7, 2010, Brian Bothast and John Lee provided a half day training session in Pontiac, Illinois for 60 agri-business site representatives. The sessions addressed bin entry hazards and controls, requirements for working around sweep augers, machine guarding hazards and controls, OSHA recordkeeping requirements, respiratory protection, fall hazards, combustible dust and OSHA emphasis programs related to the industry.

    On October 20, 2010, Brian Bothast, Tom Bielema, and John Lee provided a half day training session on the Region V Grain Handling Emphasis Program and related inspections for the OSHA compliance staff in Peoria and Fairview Heights and the staff from the Illinois On-Site Consultation Service.

    On February 21, 2011, the Peoria Area Office of the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration provided a presentation at Grain and Feed Association of Illinois Annual Convention and Trade Show held in Springfield, Illinois. Over 960 people participated in the event along with over one hundred exhibitors. Tom Bielema, Peoria Area OSHA office Area Director and Brian Bothast, Compliance Assistance Specialist provided a training session addressing effective safety and health programs, the local emphasis program on grain handling, and the focus of the emphasis program inspections. The training session focused on fall hazards in the industry, electrical hazards, engulfment hazards, avoiding auger entanglement, combustible dust and struck by hazards. Brian discussed personal protective equipment requirements, specific parts of the OSHA grain handling standard, confined space hazards and controls, housekeeping, lockout, safety related work practices, powered industrial equipment and OSHA recordkeeping. At the conference, Tom and Brian answered questions from participants with the Grain and Feed Association of Illinois, the Grain Handling Safety Coalition and business owners about a variety of safety and health issues.

    On March 9, 2011, Brian Bothast provided a training session at the GFAI Operations Conference in Decatur, Illinois, on the Region V Grain Handling Emphasis Program and the hazards OSHA inspectors will address during the process.

    On April 6, 2009, Brian Bothast met with John Lee and reviewed 159 facility OSHA 300 logs, identified trends, and developed an action plan for a statewide alliance.

    On June 9, 2009, Brian Bothast and John Lee provided a half day training session in Springfield Illinois for 35 agri-business site representatives. Brian provided training sessions on the OSHA recordkeeping requirements, ergonomics, lockout and bin entry. John Lee addressed accident costs, slip and fall hazards, and machine guarding hazards. Brian also addressed the OSHA emphasis programs on combustible dust, lead, silica, powered industrial vehicles and hazards associated with hexavalent chrome and potential occupational asthma issues. Brian also addressed the new paying for personal protective equipment standard and common OSHA violations.

    On July 8, 2009, Brian Bothast and John Lee provided a half day training session in Pontiac, Illinois for 50 agri-business site representatives. Brian provided training sessions on the OSHA recordkeeping requirements, ergonomics, lockout and bin entry. John Lee addressed accident costs, slip and fall hazards, and machine guarding hazards. Brian also addressed the OSHA emphasis programs on combustible dust, lead, silica, powered industrial vehicles and hazards associated with hexavalent chrome and potential occupational asthma issues.

    On September 1, 2, and 3, 2009, Brian Bothast and Ken Koroll manned a booth at the safety and health tent at the National Farm Progress Show in Decatur, Illinois. A variety of safety and health handouts were available for participants, participants were tested on electrical hazards and young workers were quizzed on the emphasis program hazards.

    On January 27, 2010, Brian provided a presentation 60 people at the Agri-Service Association Conference in Wisconsin to address the OSHA alliance with the Grain and Feed Association of Illinois, effective safety and health programs, combustible dust hazards, fall hazards in the industry, amputation hazards associated with grain handling equipment, sources of hexavalent chrome exposure, common OSHA recordkeeping violations, ergonomic hazards, PPE requirements, respiratory hazards, and the causes of a number of work related fatalities.

    Alliance Products.

    A bin entry permit was developed by Brian and John in order to assist employers in meeting the OSHA requirements for bin entry. Brian Bothast also developed a CSHO guide to bin entry to assist inspectors conducting grain handling inspections. The CSHO guide is attached to this evaluation.

  7. Results of Outreach for current year
  8. Type of Activity

    Number of Individuals
    Reached or Trained

    Grain Handling Outreach session in Normal, IL.

    100

    National Agronomic Environmental Health & Safety School in Bloomington, IL.

    110

    National Farm Progress Show in Decatur, Illinois.

    1000

    Grain Elevator and Processing Society in Covington, Indiana

    100

    GFAI member working session on bin entry and preventing engulfment hazards in Springfield, IL.

    6

    TOTAL

    1316

    In addition to the outreach sessions, the GFAI and OSHA requested participants return to their worksites and make an effort to control specific hazards that were discussed. The following chart details the hazard controls that were implemented by companies at over 200 facilities that participate as members of the Grain and Feed Association of Illinois during the alliance.

    Fall Hazard Controls

    A. Handrails added or repaired 206
    B. Fixed ladders repaired 145
    C. Portable ladders (removed from service) 198
    D. Fall arrest equipment purchased 75

    Machine Guarding Controls

    A. New machine guards installed 238
    B. Existing machine guards repaired 263

    Combustible Dust hazard controls

    A. Improve hot work program 45
    B. Monitoring for dust hazards 11

    Sweep Auger & related controls

    A. Improve sweep procedure 80
    B. Guarding devices added 43
    C. Additional guards for sump holes 180

    Lockout annual inspections

    A. Annual Inspection of Procedures 112

    Bin entry program improvements

    A. Implemented permit system 21
    B. New Equipment purchased 135
    C. Improvements made to procedures 150

    In the time period for the alliance, over 3000 bin entry permits issued prior to entry. The permits help the facilities to ensure they have taken the necessary steps to control hazards prior to entry.

    As the focus of the alliance has been to eliminate and controls hazards at participating sites, it is clear that a significant number of hazards have been addressed.

  9. Upcoming Milestones
  10. The OSHA offices in the State of Illinois are in the process of developing a new and improved alliance with the Grain and Feed Association of Illinois.

    Report prepared by: Brian Bothast

    Grain Bin/Silo Entry Checklist

    Issue

    Action

    Verified by

    Has all mechanical energy been locked out?

    Has all electrical energy been locked out?

    Has all pneumatic equipment been locked out?

    If there is potential for combustible gas, vapors or toxic agents, if yes, has it been tested?

    If there is any potential the grain to be waist high, what method will be used to protect workers from the engulfment hazard?

    Employees shall not enter bins, silos, tanks or flat storage where there is a bridging condition, grain on the sides that could bury them or any engulfment hazard.

    If worker enters, is an observer in communication?

    Is rescue equipment provided and specifically suited for entry?

    Is the observer trained and able to initiate rescue?

    Participants

    Name

    Signature

    Entrant(s)

    Observer/Rescue

    As the responsible person I am familiar with the hazards of the space and have verified that precautions are in place to protect workers entering the space

    Responsible person

    CSHO guide to grain bin/silo entry checklist

    Standard

    Issue

    Yes/No

    1910.272(g)(1)(ii)

    Has all mechanical energy been locked out?

    1910.272(g)(1)(ii)

    Has all electrical energy been locked out?

    1910.272(g)(1)(ii)

    Has all pneumatic equipment been locked out?

    1910.272(g)(1)(iii)

    If there is potential for combustible gas, vapors or toxic agents, if yes, has it been tested?

    1910.272(g)(2)

    If there is any potential the grain to be waist high, did the employer provide an effective method to be used to protect workers from an engulfment hazard?

    1910.272(h)(3)

    Do employees enter bins, silos, tanks or flat storage where there is a bridging condition, grain on the sides that could bury them or any engulfment hazard?

    1910.272(g)(3)

    If worker enters, is an observer in communication?

    1910.272(g)(4)

    Is rescue equipment provided and specifically suited for entry?

    1910.272(g)(5)

    Is the observer trained and able to initiate rescue?

    1910.272(g)(1)(i)

    Did a the employer's representative verify that precautions are in place to protect workers entering the space

    1910.272(h)(2)(ii)

    Did the employees "Walking down grain" and similar practices where an employee walks on grain to make it flow within or out from a grain storage structure?