Alliance -- An OSHA Cooperative Program<< Back to Alliance Program Annual Reports




Table of Contents

Executive Summary

Section 1: Overview of the OSHA Alliance Program

    Alliance Program Purpose, Beginning, and Implementation
    Benefits of Participating in the Alliance Program
    Alliance Program Participants
    Alliance Program Goals
    Relationship to the OSHA Strategic Management Plan
    Alliance Program Implementation
      Alliance Implementation Teams
    Alliance Program Web Site
    Alliance Program Promotional Materials
      Alliance Quarterly Review
      E-Mail Alerts
      Brochure and Fact Sheet
      PowerPoint® Presentation
      Exhibit Administration
      Activities Summary Documents
      Logo
      Product Development Guidance
      OSHA Articles
    Media Coverage
    Alliance Activity Data Tracker
    Alliance Annual Reports
    Milestones and Successes
    Recognition and Awards

Section 2: Alliance Program Successful Products and Activities

    Electronic Assistance Tools
      eTools
      Safety and Health Topics Pages
    Alliance Program Products
    Case Studies and Success Stories
    Speeches and Exhibits
    Training Seminars and Workshops
    Alliance Program Roundtables
      Construction Roundtable
      Hazard Communication Roundtable
      Small Business Roundtable
    Impact of the Alliance Program
    Looking Ahead

Appendix A. Descriptions of OSHA National Alliances as of FY 2005
Appendix B. National Directorate and Office Participation on National Alliance Implementation Teams
Appendix C. Alliance Product Development Worksheet
Appendix D. Alliance Product Guidelines Summary Table
Appendix E. OSHA's National Alliance-Related Presentations in FY 2005
Appendix F. OSHA's National Alliance-Related Exhibits in FY 2005
Appendix G. OSHA's National Alliance-Related Training Seminars and Workshops in FY 2005

Executive Summary

OSHA has developed an array of compliance assistance services and cooperative programs to help the regulated community comply with the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and reduce fatalities, injuries and illnesses. Through its cooperative programs, OSHA collaborates with businesses and other organizations to promote workplace safety and health. OSHA's cooperative program, the Alliance Program (the Program), has proven to be an effective tool for enabling OSHA and the Program's participants to work together to reach out to, educate and lead the nation's employers and their employees in advancing workplace safety.

The Alliance Program, created in March 2002 and administered by the Directorate of Cooperative and State Programs (DCSP), has proven invaluable to implementing OSHA's 2003-2008 Strategic Management Plan (SMP). The SMP identifies the Agency's priorities, including identifying specific areas of emphasis to target and strategies for helping industries that have high rates of injury and illness. The Program supports OSHA's Strategic Management Plan by developing and expanding the Agency's outreach and compliance assistance services and products, addressing occupational safety and health trends and emerging issues, and focusing on the Agency's priorities.

During FY 2005 (October 1, 2004, to September 30, 2005), OSHA and Alliance Program participants have had great success in achieving the Program's goals, which fall into three categories: training and education, outreach and communication, and promoting the national dialogue on workplace safety and health. Representatives from Alliances with OSHA's National, Regional and Area Offices helped achieve the outreach and communication goal in a variety of ways such as speaking and exhibiting at numerous conferences and meetings and helping to develop, review, and promote resources such as fact sheets, tip sheets, success stories and electronic assistance tools for use by OSHA staff and the public.

Alliances also provided training and education for members of the public and OSHA staff on topics such as construction, ergonomics, pyrotechnics, and process safety management. Finally, Alliance representatives helped promote the national dialogue on safety and health by developing case studies on the business value of safety and health programs, speaking at industry conferences and participating in Alliance Program roundtables and other forums. The Alliance Program has been recognized for its success in Congressional testimony and through a number of awards, including the U.S. Department of Labor's Secretary's Exceptional Achievement Award.

During FY 2005, OSHA had signed 14 new National Alliances for a total of 69 National Alliances as of September 30, 2005. OSHA's Regional and Area Offices signed 144 new Alliances in FY 2005 for a total of 316 Regional and Area Office Alliances. Additionally, the National Office renewed 7 Alliances and concluded 11 Alliances.

In addition, State Plan States and OSHA Consultation Projects are signatories to a number of Regional and Area Office Alliances and are members of a number of National Office Alliances' implementation teams. Representatives from OSHA's National Office Directorates and Regional and Area Offices also participate in the development and implementation of the Alliance Program. Several State Plan States have implemented their own Alliance Programs.

Through participating organizations, the Alliance Program has potentially reached more than eight million workers, employers, and/or association members since its implementation, and has the potential to reach millions more in the future. The following report describes many successful products, activities, and outcomes that resulted in FY 2005 from the Alliance Program through meeting the Program's goals. Future goals and plans for expanding and enhancing the Program also are highlighted.

Section 1.
Overview of the OSHA Alliance Program

Alliance Program Purpose, Beginning, and Implementation

OSHA works with the public to promote safety and health in the workplace by offering compliance assistance services and cooperative programs to businesses and organizations. This assistance helps them to work with the Agency and comply with the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. OSHA's cooperative programs are very successful and include the Consultation Program and its Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP), the Strategic Partnership Program, and the Voluntary Protection Programs (VPP). However, the Agency realized there were opportunities to reach a broader audience than the existing cooperative programs were reaching, which lead to the development of the Alliance Program in March 2002.

The Alliance Program enables organizations committed to workplace safety and health to collaborate with OSHA to prevent injuries, illnesses, and fatalities in the workplace. The focus of the Program is to develop compliance assistance tools and resources and foster greater awareness of safety and health issues in the workplace in order to prevent injuries and illness. OSHA and the Program's participants work together to reach out to, educate, and lead the nation's employers and their employees in improving and advancing workplace safety and health.

Benefits of Participating in the Alliance Program

There are many benefits that result from participating in the Alliance Program. Through the program, organizations build trusting, cooperative and collaborative relationships with OSHA; network with others who are committed to promoting safety and health issues; and find ways of maximizing resources to increase worker safety and health protection. Developing an Alliance results in recognition from OSHA, and demonstrates to employees, other organizations, and the public that the participating organization is committed to workplace safety and health.

Alliance Program Participants

The Alliance Program is open to all groups, including trade and professional organizations, businesses, labor organizations, educational institutions, and other government agencies. Though the majority of Alliances have been developed and signed with trade and professional associations. Alliances are established by OSHA's National, Regional, and Area Offices. A growing number of State Plan States have also implemented their own programs.

Fourteen new National Alliances were signed in FY 2005, with the total number of National Alliances reaching 69 as of September 30, 2005. Figure 1 illustrates the growth of the National Alliances in FY 2005.

Figure 1: FY 2005 New OSHA National Alliances

Figure 1: FY 2005 New OSHA National Alliances

Text version of Chart:

Title: New OSHA National Alliance Growth Chart FY '05 YTD (Through 9/30/05)
Type: Vertical Bar Graph 
Chart Elements: 12 bars - One bar for each month of FY '05 showing the number of new National Alliances
Values:

  • October = 2
  • November = 3
  • December = 5
  • January = 6
  • February = 9
  • March = 10
  • April = 10
  • May = 12
  • June = 12
  • July = 12
  • August = 14
  • September = 14

(See Appendix A for descriptions of the National Alliances as of FY 2005, including the goals of each Alliance, Strategic Management Plan areas of emphasis, and the potential audience reached.)

In addition, seven National Alliances were renewed in FY 2005, bringing the total number of renewed Alliances to 17. (While some of the National Alliance agreements were for a term of one year, most National Alliance agreements run for two years.) The seven Alliances renewed were with the following organizations:

  • Airline Industry and National Safety Council, International Air Transport Section - May 31, 2005
  • American Apparel and Footwear Association - March 24, 2005
  • American Biological Safety Association - October 13, 2004
  • National Association of Shooting Ranges and the Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers' Institute, Inc. - May 19, 2005
  • National Safety Council - September 21, 2005
  • Sealant Waterproofing and Restoration Institute - July 21, 2005
  • Shipbuilders Council of America - June 16, 2005

The Alliance Program has concluded a number of National Alliances for various reasons, including failure of the Alliance Program participant to fulfill responsibilities outlined in the Directive on the Program, the Alliance agreement, and the workplan developed by the implementation team; a change in the Alliance Program participant's strategic direction such that it appears to be in conflict with the goals of the Alliance; and evidence that the Alliance Program participant does not have the resources to meet the agreement's goals it purported to have when developing the Alliance. In many cases, organizations' local chapters pursued Alliances with OSHA at the Regional and Area Office level. In addition, some organizations signed new National Alliance agreements with goals that better address their interests and resources. In FY 2005, OSHA concluded 11 National Alliances with the following organizations:

  • Air Conditioning Contractors of America
  • American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
  • American Safety and Health Institute
  • Belfor
  • Center for Business and Public Policy, McDonough School of Business, Georgetown University
  • International Safety Equipment Association
  • National Association Directors of Nursing Administration in Long-Term Care
  • National Electrical Contractors Association
  • National Safety Management Society
  • Retail Industry Leaders Association (formerly the International Mass Retail Association)
  • Risk Insurance Management Society

At the end of FY 2005, 144 Regional Alliances had been signed for a total of 316 Regional and Area Office Alliances. Figure 2 illustrates the OSHA Regional and Area Office Alliance growth in FY 2005.

Figure 2: FY 2005 New OSHA Regional and Area Office Alliances

Figure 2: FY 2005 New OSHA Regional and Area Office Alliances

Text version of Chart:

Title: New OSHA Regional/Area Office Alliance Growth Chart FY '05 YTD (Through 9/30/05)
Type: Vertical Bar Graph 
Chart Elements: 12 bars - One bar for each month of FY '05 showing the number of new Regional/Area Office Alliances
Values:

  • October = 10
  • November = 23
  • December = 29
  • January = 60
  • February = 68
  • March = 80
  • April = 96
  • May = 106
  • June = 117
  • July = 126
  • August = 138
  • September = 144

State Plan States and OSHA's Consultation Projects are also signatories to a number of Regional and Area Office Alliances. In addition, State Plan States are encouraged to develop their own Alliance Programs and sign Alliance agreements. Thirteen State Plan States have adopted their own Programs, including: Arizona, Connecticut, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, Puerto Rico, South Carolina and Vermont, an increase of three State Plan States since FY 2004.

Alliance Program Goals

The Alliance Program focuses on entire industries or hazards within the industries. OSHA and the participating organizations must define, implement, and meet a set of short- and long-term goals that fall into three categories:

  • Training and education - examples of activities and products include developing and delivering training and education programs and curricula.

  • Outreach and communication - examples of activities and products include speaking and exhibiting at conferences, developing compliance assistance tools and resources, and promoting and encouraging members of the organizations to participate in OSHA's cooperative programs.

  • Promoting the national dialogue on workplace safety and health - examples of activities and products include convening or participating in forums and roundtable discussions, and developing case studies for safety and health.

These Program goals help the Agency and Program participants maximize their resources and expertise. By highlighting these goal areas and developing programs and projects that meet the individual goals of the signed Alliance agreements, OSHA and the Alliance Program participants are developing and providing compliance assistance resources for OSHA and the public. Through the Program, OSHA is also expanding its reach into local communities and providing employers with training courses, products, and services for hard-to-reach workers, especially small businesses.

OSHA and the Alliance Program participants can choose one or more of the three goals on which to focus their activities and products. At the end of FY 2005, 72 percent of the National Alliances were focusing their activities and products around the goal the training and education; all of the Alliances were focusing on their activities and products under the outreach and communication goal; and 92 percent were implementing activities and developing products under the goal of promoting the national dialogue on improving safety and health in the workplace. Figure 3 provides the percentage of National Alliances addressing the Alliance Program goals through the end of FY 2005.

Figure 3: Percentage of Alliances Addressing Alliance Program Goals
(As of 9/30/05)

Figure 3: Percentage of Alliances Addressing Alliance Program Goals (as of 9/30/05)

Text version of Chart:

Title: Percentage of Alliances Addressing Alliance Program Goals (As of 9/30/05)
Type: Vertical Bar Graph 
Chart Elements: 3 bars - One bar for each Alliance Program Goal showing percentage of Alliances Addressing those Goals
Values:

ALLIANCE PROGRAM GOALS

  • Training & Education = 72%
  • Outreach & Communication = 100%
  • Promoting the National Dialogue = 92%

Relationship to the OSHA Strategic Management Plan

In May 2003, OSHA announced its Strategic Management Plan for 2003-2008. Alliances support the plan by addressing its areas of emphasis. Figure 4 illustrates the distribution of National Alliances through the end of FY 2005, based on OSHA's Strategic Management Plan target areas of emphasis.

Figure 4: Number of National Alliances by
OSHA's Strategic Management Plan Areas of Emphasis
(As of 9/30/05)
 
Alliance by Strategic Management Plan Areas of Emphasis Number of Alliances
(69 total)
Percent of Alliances
General Industry 20 28%
Ergonomics 27 39%
Construction 16 23%
High Incident/High Severity Industries
  • Ship and boat building and repair (3)
  • Public warehousing and storage (1)
  • Landscaping/horticultural services (2)
  • Oil and gas field services
  • Preserve fruits and vegetables
  • Concrete and concrete products(1)
  • Primary metals
13 18%
Transportation 9 13%
Youth Workers 8 11%
Small Business 14 20%
Blood Lead Levels 2 2%
Silica-Related Diseases 4 5%
Immigrant Employers and Workers 19 27%
Workplace Violence 2 2%
Amputations in Manufacturing and Construction 4 4%

Alliance Program Implementation

DCSP is responsible for administering and implementing OSHA's National Alliance Program. Each individual Alliance agreement is implemented by a team of representatives from OSHA and the participating organizations. In addition, DCSP supports the each Alliance implementation teams' efforts by:

  • Planning Alliance Program meetings and events
  • Publicizing the Program through OSHA's Web site and other promotional materials
  • Tracking Program activity and outreach through the Alliance Program Activity Tracker database, Alliance Annual Reports, and Milestones and Successes
  • Seeking opportunities for recognition of the Program and its products and activities

Alliance Implementation Teams. After an Alliance agreement is signed, an implementation team is formed with representatives from OSHA and the participating organization(s). The implementation team is responsible for developing and implementing strategies in order to meet an Alliance agreement's defined goals. The team holds regular meetings or conference calls (at least three times annually) to discuss topics such as developing new OSHA electronic assistance tools; creating Alliance Program products and compliance assistance materials; sharing best practices; creating and offering training programs; speaking, participating, or exhibiting at meetings or conferences; and reviewing technical material. (For a description of the Alliance Program's FY 2005 Successful Products and Activities, see Chapter 2.)

The implementation team may include representatives from OSHA field offices or Directorates that have the applicable expertise needed or have ongoing relationships with the Alliance Program participants. Representatives from several National Office Directorates are members of National Alliance implementation teams, including the Directorate of Construction, which participates on 17 implementation teams, such as the OSHA and National Association of Home Builders Alliance; and the Directorate of Science, Technology and Medicine, which participates on 47 implementation teams, including the OSHA and American Foundry Association Alliance. The Directorate of Enforcement Programs participates 13 Alliance implementation teams, such as the OSHA and Society for Chemical Hazard Communication Alliance; and the Directorate of Standards and Guidance participates on 13 implementation teams, such as the OSHA and Club Managers Association of America. Additionally, OSHA's Office of Training and Education participates on 16 Alliance implementation teams. OSHA's Office of Small Business Assistance participates on 22 implementation teams and Office of Partnerships and Recognition participates on one implementation team. (For a listing of the National Alliance implementation team participation by each National Directorate and Office, see Appendix B.)

OSHA also encourages State Plan States and OSHA's Consultation Projects' participation on the implementation teams. Representatives from four states - Indiana, Michigan, North Carolina and Utah - participate on four National Alliance implementation teams, including the OSHA Alliances with the Airline Industry, American Meat Institute, National Association of Shooting Ranges/Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers Institute and Society of the Plastics Industry.

Alliance Program Web Site

The Alliance Program Web site provides information about Program participants, describes the Program's benefits, highlights its activities and successes, and provides information about individual Alliances. The Alliance Program Web site is continually updated so that the most current information on the Program and the participants is included. A number of Alliance Program participants have established links to this Web site in order to promote the Alliance Program, its activities and OSHA resources, including the Graphic Arts Coalition, the National Federation of Independent Business, the Independent Lubricant Manufacturers Association and others.

During FY 2005, the Alliance Program Web site had more than 960,000 visits and the Alliance Program homepage had more than 43,000 visits. In September 2005, the most popular pages on the Alliance Web site were:

  1. Alliance home page (4,015 visits)
  2. Milestones and Successes (1,364)
  3. Society for Chemical Hazard Communication (1,310)
  4. American Biological Safety Association (908)
  5. SMP Focus Areas: Construction (783)
  6. American Heart Association (629)
  7. Belfor (599)
  8. National Alliances (553)
  9. Airline Industry/National Safety Council (497)
  10. What is OSHA's Alliance Program? (474)

Figure 5 shows the number of visitors to the public Alliance Program Web site, by month, for FY 2005.

Figure 5: Visits to the Alliance Program Public Website in FY 2005

Alliance Program Public Pages
FY 2005 Visits

Figure 5: Visits to the Alliance Program Public Website in FY 2005

Text version of Chart:

Title: Alliance Program Public Pages FY 2005 Visits
Type: Line Graph 
Chart Elements: 12 points connected with a line - One point for each month of FY '05 showing the number of visits to the Alliance Program Public Website
Values:

  • October = 64,305
  • November = 52,627
  • December = 57,427
  • January = 59,07
  • February = 60,602
  • March = 72,000
  • April = 84,177
  • May = 92,425
  • June = 99,775
  • July = 90,652
  • August = 108,041
  • September = 120,767

Figure 6 provides an image of the public Alliance Web site.

Figure 6: The Public Alliance Web Site

Figure 6: The Public Alliance Web Site
 

OSHA uses the Alliance Program Limited Access Page (LAP), available only to OSHA staff, to promote and share information on the Alliance Program among OSHA staff. The LAP includes information on Alliance development and implementation and other Program resources.

Alliance Program Promotional Materials
During FY 2005, OSHA continued to publish a number of materials and publications to help promote the Alliance Program to the public, Alliance Program participant members and employees, and OSHA staff, including the Program's newsletter, Alliance Quarterly Review (AQR); brochure; Fact Sheet; PowerPoint,® entitled, "The Alliance Program: A Cooperative and Collaborative Approach to Workplace Safety and Health;" Alliance Activities Summary documents; logo; and articles promoting OSHA's programs and resources.

Alliance Quarterly Review (AQR). AQR provides information on Alliance signings, Alliance Program participant products and activities, and the Program's impact and growth. It is distributed to more than 300 individuals, including Alliance Program participants' members and employees; OSHA Federal, State Plan State, and Onsite Consultation Program staff and OSHA Education Center contacts. The newsletter also is posted on OSHA's Limited Access Page Alliance Program Web site. Four issues were published in FY 2005.

E-Mail Alerts. In FY 2005, OSHA sent eleven e-mail alerts to Alliance Program participants, announcing new OSHA compliance assistance resources, including OSHA's new Compliance Assistance Quick Start Hispanic outreach module, new Department of Labor youth employment rules, OSHA's Resource Center Loan Program, updates to OSHA's Compliance Assistance Web page, a new maritime industry guidance document on "Safe Work Practices for Marine Hanging Staging, OSHA's new Hispanic Outreach and Youth Outreach fact sheets, OSHA's new Landscape and Horticulture Safety and Health Topics page and Fireworks Pocket Card, the Alliance Program logo, OSHA's training grant proposals, and hurricane resources. Many Alliance Program participants reproduce the information in their newsletters and magazines and on their Web sites, providing another outlet for OSHA to disseminate compliance assistance information.

Brochure and Fact Sheet. In FY 2005, OSHA continued to distribute the Alliance Program brochure and fact sheet at numerous conferences, speeches and other events. The brochure highlights Alliance Program goals, benefits, requirements, products/activities, and who is eligible to participate in the program. It also includes testimonials from current Program participants to the success of the Program. The Alliance Program Fact Sheet provides information about the benefits and goals of the Program, Alliance implementation, and products and activities.

PowerPoint® Presentation. During FY 2005, The Alliance Program PowerPoint® presentation, "The Alliance Program: A Cooperative and Collaborative Approach to Workplace Safety and Health," continued to be updated on a quarterly basis. The presentation is for use by Alliance Program participants, OSHA staff and the public and explains how the Alliance Program supports OSHA's Strategic Management Plan, provides an overview of the Program's goals and benefits, and highlights its many successes. It is available on OSHA's Alliance Program Web site.

Exhibit Administration. In FY 2005, DCSP completed the design and purchase of DemoMAX portable tabletop exhibit hardware, complete with a backlit graphic, which highlights OSHA's cooperative programs. The DemoMAX was used at six expositions in FY 2005, such as the Mason Contractors Association of America booth at Construct America and at the Society for Chemical Hazard Communication's Fall 2005 Annual Conference. For more information on the Alliance Program exhibits, see page 19.

Activities Summary Documents. In FY 2005, the Alliance Program distributed 4,400 Activities Summary documents, which describe the actions being taken both by OSHA and the Alliance Program participants in support of the Program. A unique Activities Summary document is developed for each Program participant for distribution at exhibits, conferences and venues.

Logo. In FY 2005, OSHA continued to promote the use of the Alliance Program logo (Figure 7) by Program participants on Alliance-related materials. The Agency provides guidance on how and when the logo can be used by Alliance Program participants and OSHA staff. For example, Alliance Program participants can use the logo on print resources developed in consultation with OSHA through the Alliance Program, including manuals, reports, studies, fact sheets and other publications; banners and brochures; and "give aways" such as pins and magnets. In addition, the logo also is available for use in PowerPoint® presentations and videos developed by Alliance participants, through the Program, for information and/or training.

Figure 7: The Alliance Program Logo

Figure 7: The Alliance Program Logo

Product Development Guidance. The Alliance Program developed an Alliance Product Development Worksheet and Alliance Product Guidelines Summary Table in FY 2005. (See Appendix C and D.) These pieces were designed to help Program participants identify products and activities to be developed to meet the goals of their Alliance agreements. The Alliance Product Development Worksheet was developed to assist the implementation team with product identification and development. The Alliance Product Summary Table, which has been reviewed and cleared by SOL, is a resource for Alliance Coordinators to share with Alliance Program participants. It lays out the types of products which can be developed, extent of OSHA review, and logo usage.

OSHA Articles. In FY 2005, the Alliance Program prepared several articles for publication by Alliance Program participants. The articles address several subjects, including OSHA's Consultation Program and Hispanic outreach resources, workplace violence and a drug-free workplace. For example, the article on OSHA's Hispanic outreach resources describes OSHA's resources that are available to the public, including OSHA's En EspañolWeb page, the Hispanic Employers and Workers Compliance Assistance Web page, and the Agency's numerous Spanish-language publications. Many Alliance Program participants published the articles on their associations' Web sites or in their magazines and newsletters. For example, the National Federation of Independent Business published the Consultation Program article on its Web site in its Tips and Tools section. Alliance Program participants use these articles in their publications and on their Web sites, furthering OSHA's ability to disseminate information on the Agency's cooperative programs and outreach resources.

Media Coverage

OSHA continues to work to inform the media about the Alliance Program. OSHA regularly issues news releases to announce Alliance signings and Program successes. More than one hundred news releases were issued on the Alliance Program in FY 2005, representing a more than 16% increase over the 87 issued in FY 2004. In addition, more than 375 articles were published on the Alliance Program in at least 150 news publications, including the Dallas Morning News (July 2005), Facility Safety Management Magazine (January 2005), The Washington Post (October and November 2004 and August 2005) and USNewswire.com (March, April, June, July, August and September 2005). The Washington Post alone reaches more than two million people annually and US Newswire has 150,000 hits per month.

The articles on the Alliance Program focus on new agreement signings, renewals, Alliance Program products and successes. Alliance signings and successes are also featured in the Agency's biweekly, electronic newsletter, QuickTakes, which reaches more than 60,000 people.

"The Alliance program was created at OSHA in 2002, and there are now 349 of them, including ones with the National Chicken Council and Dow Chemical Co. Alliances are regional or national in scope and concentrate on outreach and education as a way of ‘promoting the national dialogue on workplace safety and health,' according to OSHA. A growing number of companies, nonprofit groups and trade associations like the arrangements. Supporters say they are a way to leverage OSHA's limited resources and create a less adversarial relationship between business and the agency."

Washington Post
August 2005

Many Alliance Program participants have also published articles on the Alliance Program and its products and successes in their own magazines and publications or on their Web sites. For example, the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) published an article entitled "NAHB Alliance with OSHA on Safety" in Nation's Building News Online in November 2004. The National Safety Council published an article entitled "Sobering Statistics" in the November 2004 issue of Safety and Health. Numerous Alliances, including Abbott, American Red Cross, American Apparel and Footwear Association and the Laser Institute of America, published news releases and articles on their Alliances with OSHA in their organizations' newsletters and on their Web sites.

Alliance Activity Data Tracker

In FY 2005, the Alliance Program developed a new and enhanced Access Database to track Alliance Program activities. The new database tracks National Alliances that are in development, signed, concluded or dormant. It identifies the OSHA contact for the Alliance, the dates of any meetings that were held to discuss the potential Alliance, and the dates of any drafts of the Alliance agreement that were developed. Through the database, the Alliance Program can track when a National Alliance agreement is finalized, cleared by OSHA and signed, when the Alliance kick-off implementation team meeting is held, and the Strategic Management Plan areas of emphasis that each National Alliance addresses.

OSHA staff who serve on a National Alliance's implementation team are listed in the database, which indicates whether the staff members work in a directorate in OSHA's National Office or in one of OSHA's Regional Offices. Team members who are from State Plan States or OSHA's Consultation Projects are also listed.

The database enables DCSP to better gauge the Alliance Program's impact and track the status of Program products and activities. Using the database, DCSP tracks OSHA's eTools and Safety and Health Topics pages that Alliance Program participants help to develop. The database also tracks Alliance Program products under development such as case studies, brochures, fact sheets and tip sheets. The database tracks conferences and events, including location and the number of attendees, where OSHA representatives make presentations or participate in exhibits promoting the Alliance Program. It also maintains a list of training events presented by Alliance Program participants for OSHA staff and members of the public. Reports on Program activities and products can be generated.

Alliance Annual Reports

OSHA publishes annual reports for each Alliance that are prepared by the Alliance Implementation Team Coordinators. The reports describe the purpose and scope of the Alliances; include a list of the team members and contributors; and highlight events and products of the Alliances, results and successes achieved, and upcoming milestones. Each report for National Alliances is posted on the Alliance's Web page on the OSHA Web site. Regional and Area Office Alliance annual reports are posted on the appropriate Regional Alliance Web page.

Milestones and Successes

The Alliance Program has produced numerous workplace safety and health products and resources for the public and OSHA staff in FY 2005. Examples of these successes are published on the Alliance Program Milestones and Successes Web page, which highlights how the Alliances are meeting the Program's goals of training and education, outreach and communication, and promoting the national dialogue on workplace safety and health. The Web page is updated regularly and received 11,875 visits in FY 2005. It includes information on Alliance-related speaking and exhibiting events, the development electronic assistance tools such as eTools and Safety and Health Topic Pages, forums and meetings related to the Alliance Program, and the development of safety and health resources such as industry-developed voluntary guidelines.

Recognition and Awards

During FY 2005, OSHA sought opportunities to recognize the Alliance Program's many successes. OSHA submitted an application on the Alliance Program for the 2006 Innovation in American Government Awards. The application highlighted the Program's innovative approach to reducing workplace fatalities, injuries and illnesses by working collaboratively with businesses, trade and professional organizations and others to develop tools and resources to promote safety and health to the nation's employers and employees. OSHA also submitted an application for the Program and the Program's newsletter, Alliance Quarterly Review, to be considered for the U.S. Department of Labor's Secretary's Exceptional Achievement Award.

Several Alliance Program participants also sought and received recognition for their achievements through the Alliance Program. For example, Delta Airlines, a member of the OSHA and Airline Industry Alliance, was recognized as one of "America's Safest Companies" in May 2005 by Occupational Hazards magazine. Delta also received the 2005 National Safety Council Green Cross for Excellence award, which is given to the Council members with lost work day rates below the Bureau of Labor Statistics national average. Delta's participation in the Alliance Program was a key factor in its receiving such recognition.

In addition, an Alliance Program participant recognized the value of the Alliance Program in Congressional testimony. In testimony before the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Subcommittee on May 10, 2005, Roy Swindal, Mason Contractors Association of America (MCAA), said, "MCAA has an Alliance with OSHA, which focuses on scaffolding, fall protection, wall bracing and forklift safety issues. Our Director of Engineering, with the help of several others in industry, has written a handbook on wall bracing, which OSHA actually refers to for guidance on wall bracing issues. These alliances are, in our view, invaluable because they allow us to share ideas with OSHA on how we can better protect the health and safety of our workers. I commend OSHA for the resources they dedicate to this important effort."

Section 2.
Alliance Program Successful Products and Activities

Since its inception, the Alliance Program has been very successful on many levels. During FY 2005, individual Alliances have produced numerous useful products and have been involved in many activities that have had far reaching impact on workplace safety and health. Alliance Program participants provide input into the development of OSHA's electronic assistance tools, including eTools and Safety and Health Topics pages and have collaborated with the Agency to produce tip sheets, brochures, case studies, success stories and other products. Working together, OSHA and several Alliance Program participants provided training for OSHA staff and industry representatives on a number of issues. In addition, through the Alliance Program, OSHA staff and representatives from Program participants have made presentations and exhibited at conferences and events to promote workplace safety and health, individual Alliances, and the Alliance Program.

Electronic Assistance Tools

In FY 2005, Alliance Program participants helped update existing and develop new OSHA eTools and Safety and Health Topics pages, using their expertise on a specific industry or hazard. These tools provide the public with assistance and information for developing comprehensive safety and health practices and addressing safety and health hazards and are posted on OSHA's Web site. OSHA provides the final approval of a new or improved electronic assistance tool.

eTools. As of September 30, 2005, 17 eTools had been revised or developed collaboratively by Alliance Program participants and OSHA. eTools are "stand-alone," interactive, Web-based training tools on occupational safety and health topics. They are highly illustrated and utilize graphical menus and enable the users to answer questions, and receive reliable advice on how OSHA regulations apply to their work sites.

In FY 2005, OSHA's Noise and Hearing Conservation eTool was as a product of the OSHA and National Hearing Conservation Association Alliance. In addition, the American Shipbuilding Association, the National Shipbuilding Research Program, and the Shipbuilders Council of America provided expertise for the development of OSHA's Shipyard Employment eTool modules for Ship Building, Ship Breaking and Barge Cleaning. (See Figure 8 for the eTools and Safety and Health Topics pages that were developed as Alliance Program products in FY 2005.) Eleven more eTools are under development as products of the Alliance Program.

Safety and Health Topics Pages. Alliance Program participants also help to update and create new OSHA Safety and Health Topics pages, another resource on OSHA's Web site. These pages provide information and resources on recognizing, evaluating and controlling hazards within specific industries and have a variety of reference materials, including OSHA and non-OSHA documents, presentations, course handouts, video clips, and links to other Internet sites.

Alliance Program participants and DCSP work with OSHA's Salt Lake Technical Center (SLTC); of the Directorate of Science, Technology, and Medicine (DSTM); and technical staff from various OSHA Directorates and Offices to review existing Safety and Health Topics pages and develop new ones.

Since the Alliance Program's implementation, 96 Safety and Health Topics pages have been collaboratively developed or updated by Alliance Program participants and OSHA, with representatives from 60 Alliance Program participants serving on the Topics page's editorial boards. Editorial Boards, made up of Alliance Program participants and OSHA experts, ensure that the Topics pages are complete and accurate. Topics pages have been updated based on recommendations and information provided by many Alliance participants, including representatives from the construction, printing and airline industries.

In FY 2005 OSHA developed four new Safety and Health Topics pages with expertise from the Program's participants:

  • Chemical Reactivity Hazards Safety and Health Topics page - the Chemical Reactivity Hazards Management Alliance and The Dow Chemical Company
  • Ionizing Radiation Safety and Health Topics page, Pregnant Workers Module - Health Physics Society.
  • Landscape and Horticultural Services Safety and Health Topics page - the Professional Landcare Network
  • Lumber and Building Material Dealer Industry Safety and Health Topics page - The National Lumber and Building Materials Dealers Association.
 
Figure 8: FY 2005 eTools and Safety and Health Topics Pages
that are Products of the Alliance Program
 
Product Alliance Program Participants Completion Date
Ionizing Radiation Safety and Health Topics page
- Pregnant Workers Module
Health Physics Society December 2004
Noise and Hearing Conservation eTool National Hearing Conservation Association January 2005
Shipyard Employment eTool
- Ship Building Module
American Shipbuilding Association, National Shipbuilding Research Program, and Shipbuilders Council of America September 2005
Shipyard Employment eTool
- Ship Breaking Module
American Shipbuilding Association, National Shipbuilding Research Program, and Shipbuilders Council of America September 2005
Shipyard Employment eTool
- Barge Cleaning Module
American Shipbuilding Association, National Shipbuilding Research Program, and Shipbuilders Council of America September 2005
Chemical Reactivity Hazards Safety and Health Topics page Chemical Reactivity Hazards Management and The Dow Chemical Company December 2004
Landscape and Horticultural Services Safety and Health Topics page Professional Landcare Network May 2005
Lumber and Building Material Dealer Industry Safety and Health Topics page National Lumber and Building Materials Dealers Association June 2005

Alliance Program Products

In FY 2005, OSHA and Alliance Program participants worked collaboratively to produce a number of products, including brochures, manuals, fact sheets, tip sheets and other resources. Alliance products do not go through the OSHA clearance process but are made available to the public through the Alliance Program participants, which usually post the products online. OSHA can link to the Alliance products from the appropriate Alliance Program participant Web page or Safety and Health Topics page on OSHA's Web site.

The OSHA and Airline Industry Alliance, which includes 13 Airlines and the National Safety Council's International Air Transport Section, developed A Guide to Packing for Business and Personal Travel. The brochure provides guidance to travelers on how to pack baggage to avoid injury. The brochure is available on the members-only portion of the National Safety Council's Web site and is distributed by the airlines to interested organizations.

The American Apparel and Footwear Association (AAFA), through its Alliance with OSHA, produced an ergonomics manual, Ergonomics for Supervisors, Volume 1-An Introductory Manual for the Apparel and Footwear Industries. The manual is designed to help plant supervisors develop effective ergonomics programs, and includes information on musculoskeletal disorders and workstation design. The manual is available on AAFA's Web site and linked to from the OSHA and AAFA Alliance Web page on OSHA's Web site.

Through the OSHA and Independent Lubricant Manufacturers Association (ILMA) Alliance, ILMA developed the Metalworking Fluids in Small Business: A Health and Safety "Quickstart" Guide. The guide provides a step-by-step outline on how to work safely with metalworking fluids (MWFs) and is designed to help small businesses and their employees effectively manage the health, safety and environmental impacts of MWFs. The guide is available on ILMA's Web site and linked to from the OSHA and ILMA Alliance Web page and the Metalworking Fluids Safety and Health Topics page on OSHA's Web site.

In addition, through the OSHA and National Association of Shooting Ranges/Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers (NASR/SAAMI) Alliance, NASR/SAAMI produced the Lead Management and OSHA Compliance for Indoor Shooting Ranges booklet. Through the OSHA and Professional Landcare Network (PLANET) Alliance, PLANET developed two Safety Tips sheets on Slips and Trips, and Reducing the Risk of Lifting Injuries in the Landscape and Horticultural Industries. Both tips sheets are available in English and Spanish on PLANET's Web site and linked to from the OSHA and PLANET Alliance Web page and the Landscaping and Horticulture Safety and Health Topics page on OSHA's Web site.

Other examples of products developed by Alliance Program participants in FY 2005 are The Lead in Construction Safety and Health CD manual, which was produced by the Sealant Waterproofing and Restoration Institute, and the Service Vehicle Safety Quick Card, which was produced by the Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Association.

Case Studies and Success Stories

In FY 2005, the Alliance Program developed eight case studies and one success story. Success stories describe in one or two pages how a company solved a safety and health problem and the impact of the solution. Case studies are five to 10 pages and provide more in depth analysis of a company's problem, the solution it implemented and the impact on the company.

In April 2005, OSHA posted eight case studies that were developed through the OSHA and Abbott Alliance. The case studies, which are posted on the OSHA and Abbott Alliance Web page on OSHA's Web site, communicate the business value and competitive advantages of an effective safety and health program. The case studies address a variety of issues including ergonomics, construction, motor vehicle fleet safety and occupational exposure limits. For example, one case study compares the construction of two professional athletic stadiums - Miller Park, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and Paul Brown Stadium, in Cincinnati, Ohio. Miller Park opened a year late and more than $90 million over budget and did not have an established safety and health program. Paul Brown Stadium, in contrast, had an established safety and health program and was built in two and a half years and the net program savings were estimated at $4.6 million through reduced workers' compensation and general liability costs.

The OSHA and Abbott Alliance also developed a PowerPoint® presentation, based on the case studies, which was posted on the Alliance Web page in July 2005. The presentation can be used as a teach aid to promote the business case for safety and health to business students, small businesses and other audiences.

The OSHA and American Heart Association Alliance (AHA) developed a success story that addresses automated external defibrillators (AED). The success story is posted on the OSHA and AHA Alliance Web page, OSHA's AED Safety and Health Topics page, and OSHA's Compliance Assistance Web page. In addition, during FY 2005 the Alliance Program began developing additional case studies and success stories with other Alliance Program participants, including The Dow Chemical Company and the Steel Group Alliance.

Speeches and Exhibits

OSHA conducts Alliance Program outreach by delivering presentations and exhibiting at conferences. For example, in FY 2005, representatives of OSHA's National and Regional Offices and State Plan States delivered more than 115 presentations on or related to the Alliance Program to more than 9,800 attendees. (See Appendix E for a listing of Alliance-related presentations given by OSHA representatives.) For example, Mike Connors, Regional Administrator, Region V, made a presentation about the case studies developed through the OSHA and Abbott Alliance at the World Safety Congress, in Orlando, Florida on September 20, 2005.

Alliance Program participants also gave more than 25 presentations at safety and health-related and industry conferences in FY 2005. Some of the subjects covered included the benefits of collaborating with OSHA through the Alliance Program and promotion of Alliance Program products. For example, David Heidorn, the American Society of Safety Engineers' Manager of Government Affairs and Policy, and Aaron Trippler, the American Industrial Hygiene Association's Director of Government Affairs, gave a joint presentation on federal and state workplace safety and health issues at the ASSE Safety 2005 Conference and Exposition, which was June 13, 2005. Their presentation included a discussion of OSHA's Alliance Program.

More than 11,000 people visited 35 National Alliance-related exhibits at various events around the country, which were staffed by OSHA representatives and National Alliance participants during FY 2005. (See Appendix F for a listing of Alliance-related exhibits.) DSCP used its new Demomax exhibit hardware at six exhibits to promote the Alliance Program and OSHA's other cooperative programs. Examples of conferences where OSHA staffed Alliance-related exhibits include the American Pyrotechnics Association 57th Annual Meeting and Convention in San Francisco, California on September 20, 2005 and the National Hearing Conservation Association's 30th Annual Hearing Conservation Conference in Seattle Washington on February 24-26, 2005 in Tucson, Arizona.

The Alliance Program arranged for representatives from OSHA's National and Regional Offices, Consultation Projects and State Plan States, including Maryland, Minnesota, New Mexico and North Carolina to staff 32 of the exhibits. OSHA staff answered visitors' questions about OSHA's Alliance Program and other occupational safety and health issues. The Alliance Program also provided OSHA publications, including Alliance Activities Summary documents and copies of All About OSHA and the Alliance Program Fact Sheet, for distribution at the exhibit booths. In addition, the Program sent publications to Alliance Program participants to support three exhibits when OSHA representatives were unavailable to staff an exhibit booth, including:

  • Club Managers Association of America's Legislative/Leadership Conference
  • Construction Management Association of America's 2005 National Conference and Trade Show of America
  • National Telecommunications Safety Panel's International Telecommunications Safety Conference

Training Seminars and Workshops

During FY 2005, OSHA and Alliance participants have developed and delivered 27 National Alliance-related training workshops and seminars to educate more than 800 attendees, including Alliance Program participants' members and staff, OSHA staff and members of the public about various occupational safety and health issues.

Through the OSHA and AAFA Alliance, AAFA developed an ergonomics training class, "A Practical and Economical Approach to Enhancing You Company's Success Without Reinventing the Wheel," for AAFA members and others in the apparel and footwear industry. The course was based on the ergonomics manual, Ergonomics for Supervisors: Volume I, An Introductory Manual for the Apparel and Footwear Industries, developed by the Alliance. Representatives from the Alliance implementation team delivered the class to 12 attendees on March 16, 2005, and 40 attendees on April 5, 2005, in Charlotte, North Carolina, and again to 10 attendees on May 10, 2005, in Miami, Florida. Similarly, the OSHA and Safe Tank Alliance, which includes the American Petroleum Institute and the National Fire Protection Association, held a Safe Tank Entry and Best Practices seminar for 80 attendees April 7-8, 2005, in Richmond, California. Representatives from the Safe Tank Alliance, joined refinery professionals, OSHA staff and State Plan State participants for technical presentations on safe work practices, lessons learned and new technology being used by the oil and gas industry during tank entry and cleaning operations. (See Appendix G for a listing of Alliance-related training seminars and workshops in FY 2005.)

Alliance Program Roundtables

Since the inception of the Alliance Program, DCSP has hosted meetings to bring together Alliance Program participants to network, identify opportunities for collaboration to develop programs and materials, and showcase their products and activities. For example, DCSP invited Program participants to speak and exhibit at OSHA's First Annual Compliance Assistance Conference, which was June 9-13, 2003. In addition, in the first two years of the Program, DCSP held several Alliance Program orientation meetings for participants to learn more about the Program.

In 2004, DCSP recognized that the Alliance Program participants were interested in a number of the same topics and issues and their expertise could be leveraged by bringing them together to discuss these topics and develop related compliance assistance tools and resources. As a result, OSHA began scheduling and holding Alliance Program roundtable meetings.

Construction Roundtable. In FY 2004, representatives from 15 construction-related Alliances met on July 8, 2004, to share information on safety and health issues such as fall protection, electrical hazards, and ergonomics and to discuss ways of working together on Alliance-related projects. Their discussions included how compliance assistance tools and working with OSHA Regional and Area Offices can help Alliances maximize their resources. The Fall Protection and Design for Safety Workgroups were established at the Roundtable.

The Construction Roundtable Fall Protection Workgroup met four times in FY 2005, on November 8, 2004, January 31, 2005, May 2, 2005, and August 1, 2005. The workgroup's projects included:

  • Developing Fall Protection Safety Tip Sheets for Employers and Employees
  • Providing comments on the "Fall Hazard Awareness for the Construction Industry" training course, developed by OSHA's Office of Training and Education

In addition, the Workgroup will develop new projects and compliance assistance tools such as toolbox talk materials in FY 2006. Representatives from the following Alliances are participating in the Fall Protection Workgroup:

  • American Society of Safety Engineers
  • Construction Institute-American Society of Civil Engineers
  • Gilbane Building Company
  • Laborers Health and Safety Fund of North America
  • National Association of Home Builders
  • Sealant Waterproofing and Restoration Institute
  • Washington Group International

The Construction Roundtable Design for Safety Workgroup met four times in FY 2005, on October 20, 2004, February 1, 2005, May 3, 2005, and July 19, 2005. The Workgroup's projects include:

  • Developing a general PowerPoint® presentation on "Designing for Safety"
  • Developing case study on "Designing for Safety" with Washington Group International
  • Developing a "Design for Safety" Web page

In addition, the Workgroup will develop a Design for Safety Training Course and an OSHA 10-hour Course for engineers in FY 2006. Representatives from the following Alliances are participating in the Design for Safety Workgroup:

  • American Society of Safety Engineers
  • Construction Institute-American Society of Civil Engineers
  • Gilbane Building Company
  • Laborers Health and Safety Fund of North America
  • Sealant, Waterproofing and Restoration Institute
  • Washington Group International

Hazard Communication Roundtable. Representatives from 18 Alliances met on February 15, 2005, to discuss the development of hazard communication compliance assistance resources. The Hazard Communication Roundtable included an update from Jennifer Silk, the deputy director of Directorate of Standards and Guidance, on OSHA's Hazard Communication Initiative. The group then identified specific hazard communication issues to discuss and used workgroups to identify outreach and compliance assistance projects that could be developed.

As a result of the meeting, the attendees agreed to work together to address several issues:

  • Hazard communication awareness and training
  • Developing model material safety date sheets
  • Promoting the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS)
 
Alliance Program
Hazard Communication Roundtable
Attendees
  • Airline Industry
  • American Industrial Hygiene Association
  • Association for High Technology Distribution
  • Building Service Contractors Association International
  • Club Managers Association of America
  • Chemical Reactivity Hazards Management
  • Coordinating Committee for Automotive Repair
  • Graphic Arts Coalition
  • Independent Lubricant Manufacturers Association
  • National Air Transportation Association - Airline Services Council
  • National Federation of Independent Business
  • National Fire Protection Association
  • National Hearing Conservation Association
  • National Lumber and Building Material Dealers Association
  • Society for Chemical Hazard Communication
  • Society of the Plastics Industry
  • Steel Group

At the Roundtable, the Promoting the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals Workgroup was established. The Workgroup met on August 1, 2005 met to discuss the development and distribution of resources to promote the GHS to small business in anticipation of OSHA's revising its Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) to adopt the GHS. The Workgroup recommended developing the following four compliance assistance resources:

  • Overview of the benefits of the GHS and explanation of why OSHA is adopting it
  • Frequently asked questions document that explains the GHS's impact
  • Side-by-side comparison of OSHA's existing HCS and the GHS
  • Examples comparing chemical container labels and material safety data sheets prepared under OSHA's HCS and the GHS

The Alliance Program will schedule additional Promoting the GHS Workgroup meetings when OSHA publishes the advanced notice of proposed rulemaking for revising the HCS to adopt the GHS.
Representatives from the following Alliances are participating in the GHS workgroup:

  • American Industrial Hygiene Association
  • American Foundry Society
  • American Society of Safety Engineers
  • Association for High Technology Distribution
  • Chemical Reactivity Hazards Management Alliance
  • Coordinating Committee for Automotive Repair
  • Graphic Arts Coalition
  • Independent Lubricant Manufacturers Association
  • National Air Transportation Association - Airlines Services Council
  • National Federation of Independent Business
  • Society for Chemical Hazard Communication
  • Society of the Plastics Industry
  • The Dow Chemical Company

Small Business Roundtable. Representatives from 17 Alliances met September 8, 2005, to provide feedback and input on the compliance assistance components of OSHA's Small Business Initiative (SBI). The Roundtable attendees participated in four breakout groups to discuss OSHA's Consultation Program, small business issues related to safety and health training, and OSHA's printed materials and Web-based tools. As a result of the Roundtable, the attendees provided a number of recommendations for OSHA to enhance its small business compliance assistance activities and resources.

Alliance Program
Small Business Roundtable
Attendees
  • American Industrial Hygiene Association
  • American Society of Safety Engineers
  • Association for High Technology Distribution
  • Building Service Contractors Association International
  • Chemical Reactivity Hazards Management Alliance
  • Graphic Arts Coalition
  • Highway Work Zone Safety and Health Coalition
  • Independent Lubricant Manufacturers Association
  • National Air Transportation Association - Airline Services Council
  • National Federation of Independent Business
  • National Lumber and Building Material Dealers Association
  • National Safety Council
  • National Wooden Pallet and Container Association
  • Professional Landcare Network
  • Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Association
  • Shipbuilders Council of America
  • Society of the Plastics Industry

Impact of the Alliance Program

The majority of organizations participating in the Alliance Program are trade and professional associations that share information about OSHA and the Alliance Program with their members and others in the industry; potentially impacting millions of employers' and workers' safety and health practices in the workplace every day. The Alliance Program has been especially effective in providing information and increasing safety and health awareness to the small business community and hard-to-reach workers. Many Alliances are with organizations that represent industries with a large number of small businesses, such as the National Federation of Independent Business, Graphic Arts Coalition and the Independent Electrical Contractors.

By the end of September 2005, OSHA signed 14 new National Alliances for a total of 69 National Alliances. The Regional and Area Offices signed 144 new Alliances in FY 2005 for a total of 316 Regional and Area Office Alliances. Working together through the Alliance Program during FY 2005, OSHA and Program participants developed eight OSHA eTools and Safety and Health Topics pages and various Alliance products such as fact sheets, success stories, case studies and industry-developed voluntary guidelines. Representatives from OSHA and the Alliance Program participants made presentations and speeches and participated in exhibits at 155 conferences and other events. Finally, the Alliance Program provided training to more than 600 OSHA staff and industry representatives at 22 events on safety and health issues such as PSM, machine guarding and the Voluntary Protection Programs.

Looking Ahead

In FY 2006, OSHA will continue to work with trade associations, professional organizations, governmental entities, businesses, and academia through the Alliance Program to promote workplace safety and health. OSHA also plans to continue to expand the Alliance Program by signing 20 new Alliances. In addition, OSHA will renew existing Alliances with organizations that want to continue to work with OSHA to address occupational safety and health issues. Those Alliances that have met the goals of their agreements or that do not have the resources necessary to meet their agreements' goals will be concluded. In the coming year, OSHA will also review the Alliance Program Directive to identify areas of the Program that can be enhanced and revised.

The Alliance Program will also continue to support the Agency's Strategic Management Plan, focusing on the areas of emphasis identified in the plan, including Hispanic outreach, small business, construction and others. It will address these areas by developing of compliance assistance products and activities for use by the regulated community.

OSHA will leverage Alliance Program participants' expertise to develop new compliance assistance tools, such as eTools, Safety and Health Topics pages, publications and training courses. In FY 2006, OSHA plans to develop the following Topics pages with the input of Alliance Program participants:

  • Business Case for Safety and Health Topics page
  • Building Services and Maintenance Industry Safety and Health Topics page
  • Confined Space Safety and Health Topics page - Module for Safety Tank Entry
  • Patient Handling for Acute Care Settings Safety and Health Topics page
  • Basic Steel Industry Safety and Health Topics page

OSHA also plans to collaborate with Alliance Program participants in FY 2006 on the development of eTools, including:

  • Ergonomic Solutions for Electrical Contractors - Installation and Repair Module
  • Ergonomic Solutions for Electrical Contractors - Prefabrication Module
  • Ergonomics - Printing Industry: Lithography Module
  • Ergonomics - Printing Industry: Flexography Module
  • Ergonomics - Printing Industry: Screen Printing Module
  • Ergonomics Training for the Airline Industry
  • Machine Guarding- Module on Thermoforming
  • Shipyard Employment - Fire Protection Supplement

Working with Alliance Program participants, OSHA will identify opportunities to speak and exhibit about the Program and workplace safety and health issues. OSHA and Program participants will continue to identify training opportunities. For example, the OSHA and American Meat Institute Alliance will present a Meat Industry Orientation seminar for Region VIII staff on April 12, 2006, in Denver, Colorado. Similarly, the Society of the Plastics Industry will present free training on blow molding, horizontal injection molding, extrusion and thermoforming at the 2006 NPE 2006: The International Plastics Showcase, June 20-21, 2006, in Chicago, Illinois. In addition, Alliance Program participants will continue to provide input on OSHA draft products and publications such as Quick Cards and Safety and Health Information Bulletins.