September 15, 2007 · Volume 6, Issue 18
A twice monthly e-news memo with information, updates, and results from OSHA about safety and health in America's workplaces.
Archive Notice - OSHA Archive
NOTICE: This is an OSHA Archive Document, and may no longer represent OSHA Policy. It is presented here as historical content, for research and review purposes only.


In This Issue
OSHA Hosts Informal Public Hearing on PPE Design Standards
OSHA Issues Draft Ergonomics Guidelines on Preventing Musculoskeletal Injuries in Shipyards
Machine Guarding eTool Features New Thermoforming Module
OSHA's Cooperative Programs Focus of NSC "Webinar"
National Preparedness Month Observed During September
OSHA Officials Among Featured Speakers at Local Safety Conference
Alliance Program News
Voluntary Protection Programs Activity
Upcoming Events
"QuickTips" from QuickTakes

OSHA Hosts Informal Public Hearing on PPE Design Standards
    OSHA is inviting the public to participate in an informal public hearing on the agency's plan to update its personal protective equipment (PPE) design standards. The hearing is scheduled for 9 a.m. on Dec. 4, 2007, at the U.S. Department of Labor's Frances Perkins Building in Washington. OSHA published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking in the May 17 Federal Register to revise the PPE sections of its general industry, shipyard employment, longshoring and marine terminals standards regarding the use of eye, face, head, and foot protection. More details on the hearing are available in the Aug. 31 Federal Register.

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OSHA Issues Draft Ergonomics Guidelines on Preventing Musculoskeletal Injuries in Shipyards
    OSHA is seeking comments on new ergonomics guidelines that could help employers and their employees in the shipyard industry prevent musculoskeletal injuries. The draft guidance, Ergonomics for the Prevention of Musculoskeletal Disorders: Guidelines for Shipyards, provides practical recommendations for employers to reduce the number and severity of workplace injuries in their facilities by identifying, evaluating and controlling hazards and using best practices that have been successful in shipyards. Procedures for submitting comments are outlined in the Sept. 11 Federal Register.

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Machine Guarding eTool Features New Thermoforming Module
   Employers and employees in the plastics manufacturing industry stand to benefit from the launch of a new Thermoforming Module for the Plastics Machinery portion of OSHA's interactive, Web-based Machine Guarding eTool. The module and eTool are products of the agency's alliance with the Society of the Plastics Industry. The module identifies potential hazards and possible solutions to reduce injuries from thermoforming, a manufacturing process using a thermoplastic sheet or film that is fed into an oven and then heated, formed and trimmed.

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OSHA's Cooperative Programs Focus of NSC "Webinar"
    The National Safety Council (NSC) will host a Web-based seminar on Oct. 2 from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. EDT focusing on OSHA's cooperative programs and the value of partnering with OSHA to improve workplace safety and health. Featured speakers include OSHA's Directorate of Cooperative and State Programs Director Paula White and General Electric Company's Global Manager of VPP and Safety Programs Michael J. Vigezzi. For registration information, visit http://www.nsc.org/webinars/beyond.htm, or call NSC Customer Service at (800) 621-7619.

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National Preparedness Month Observed During September
    September is National Preparedness Month designed to increase public awareness about the importance of preparing for emergencies and to encourage individuals to take action. OSHA is alerting employers about emergencies that can be the result of man-made or natural causes, including hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, explosions, civil disturbances, fires, toxic gas releases, chemical spills, radiological accidents, workplace violence, and terrorism. All too often, people are forced to evacuate their workplace without warning and when least expected. Few people can think clearly and logically in a crisis, and that is why it is so important to prepare for an emergency before it happens. The best way to protect yourself, those you work with, or your business, is to expect the unexpected and develop an emergency action plan to guide you when immediate action is necessary. While OSHA does not require all establishments to have an emergency action plan, the agency certainly encourages all businesses to have one. OSHA's interactive, Web-based Evacuation Plans and Procedures eTool is a resource to help employers prevent severe employee injuries during emergencies.

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OSHA Officials Among Featured Speakers at Local Safety Conference
    OSHA's Baton Rouge, La., Area Office Director Greg Honaker and Assistant Area Office Director Dorinda Folse will participate in the 12th Annual Gulf Coast Safety and Security Conference/Exposition taking place on Sept. 19 in Baton Rouge at the Holiday Inn Select. Local safety professionals are expected to attend breakout sessions on how to create a vibrant safety culture, spice up safety meetings, or achieve Voluntary Protection Programs status for contractors, just to name a few. To register online, visit http://www.safetylca.org/ on the World Wide Web. For more information, contact Dianna Braud at (225) 766-0955, ext. 125 or dbraud@safetylca.org.

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Alliance Program News
    National Office: Ensuring the safety and health of America's working men and women in the plastics industry is the focus of an alliance renewed between OSHA and the Society of the Plastics Industry.

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Voluntary Protection Programs Activity
    Visit "recent approvals" on the Voluntary Protection Programs (VPP) page of OSHA's Web site to view the latest list of employers approved for new or continued participation in VPP. We encourage you to examine the entire VPP site to learn more about how OSHA's premier cooperative program can help protect employees and lower workers' compensation costs.

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Upcoming Events
    OSHA posted more safety- and health-related training and conference information to its events Web page. Check for events near you.

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"QuickTips" from QuickTakes
    Although summer employment for some teens has come to an end, other teens may be continuing to work while back at school, especially in the food service industry. That is why OSHA is reminding employers that it is important for all teenagers working in restaurants to follow safe, healthful work practices while cooking, serving and cleaning up. Here is some advice "served up" by OSHA to benefit teens and other restaurant employees.
  • Use caution when working around deep fat fryers, and take care not to overfill or pour excessive amounts of frozen fries into them at one time. Overfilling causes excessive splashing and bubbling over of hot oil.
  • Wear appropriate clothing-avoid open-toed shoes and loose-fitting shirts, pants or jewelry.
  • Avoid static postures by continually changing your position. Use a foot rest bar or a low stool to help alter your posture by raising one foot and then the other.
  • If working at a drive-thru, keep the window closed as much as possible to limit exposure to automobile exhaust.

  •     An OSHA resource offering more information on the common hazards and possible solutions to those hazards associated with the restaurant industry is the interactive, Web-based Teen Worker Safety in Restaurants eTool. Though developed for teenagers, the guide is useful for all food service employees to better understand OSHA's regulations for restaurants and prevent injuries and illnesses at their workplaces. Turn to your next issue of QuickTakes for more "QuickTips" on another safety and health topic.


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    Editor: Elaine Fraser, OSHA Office of Communications, 202-693-1999

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