NOTICE: This is an OSHA Archive Document, and no longer represents OSHA Policy. It is presented here as historical content, for research and review purposes only.

OSHA's Involvement in Non-Traditional Sectors



Action: To establish OSHA's involvement in industry sectors where OSHA has had minimal presence in the past but where there is an emerging safety and health need, such as in the service sector.

Background: In recent years service industries have experienced an explosive growth in this country, creating new safety and health challenges for industry, labor, and government. While in the past, OSHA concentrated its scarce resources on more traditional workplaces (e.g., manufacturing and construction) and traditional hazards (e.g., machine guarding, fall hazards), OSHA must now direct some of its energies and resources to meet these emerging challenges. Service sector employees in health care, fast food, and automobile repair facilities experience injury and illness rates equaling or exceeding those in high hazard manufacturing industries such as steel, textiles, and paper. In addition, due to the lack of OSHA's presence in these sectors, employers and employees may be less familiar with safety and health issues, the nature of the hazards they encounter, and the preventive measures than those where OSHA's enforcement and assistance efforts have been available for years or decades.

Description: OSHA will design a multi-faceted Service Sector Program to target resources to enhance worker protection in the most hazardous service sectors of the economy. The multi-faceted program will include: 1) developing partnerships with professional and trade associations and labor unions to highlight service sector safety and health issues and provide training for workers, 2) recognizing model facilities/programs through the agency's Voluntary Protection Programs (VPP) to demonstrate effective service sector safety and health programs, 3) providing technical assistance through the agency's consultation programs to assist small business, and 4) focusing enforcement efforts through agency national and special emphasis programs to emphasize OSHA's commitment to service sector workers.

Implementation Plan: Develop the design for a coordinated service sector program, including program impact measures, by December 31, 1995, and schedule meetings with OSHA partners for discussions and specific input.

NOTICE: This is an OSHA Archive Document, and no longer represents OSHA Policy. It is presented here as historical content, for research and review purposes only.