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2014 National Safety Stand-Down Press Coverage


NRCA and United Union of Roofers, Waterproofers and Allied Workers support National Safety Stand-Down, June 2-6

Industrial Safety and Hygiene News

May 27, 2014

The United Union of Roofers, Waterproofers and Allied Workers (UURWAW) and National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) are supporting the National Safety Stand-Down to Prevent Falls in Construction, organized by OSHA, taking place throughout the U.S. from June 2-6, 2014.

"The latest statistics from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show 65 workers in the roofing industry died in 2012 from falls that occurred as they were doing their jobs," said William Good, executive vice president of the NRCA. "Those numbers are not just cold statistics but reflect 65 families that have been changed forever by the loss of a loved one - a spouse, father, mother, son or daughter whose death has left a void in the hearts of family and friends."

The National Safety Stand-Down is an effort to focus company and worker attention on the significance of fall hazards in construction and emphasize the importance of effectively implementing fall-protection systems on every project.

NRCA and UURWAW are encouraging their members and all involved in the roofing industry to participate in the National Safety Stand-Down by delivering focused fall-protection awareness toolbox talks at the start of each day during that week and throughout the year. Special materials have been developed by UURWAW and NRCA for this purpose that can be accessed on their websites (http://www.unionroofers.com) and printed for use each day.

"Let's pledge to continue the efforts to increase awareness of fall hazards, not just that week but throughout the year so all workers are safe performing the critical, quality work they do and are able to go home to their families each day!" said Good.

Honeywell fall protection solutions supports National Safety Stand-Down, June 2-6

Industrial Safety and Hygiene News

May 28, 2014

In an effort to raise awareness for worker safety, Honeywell (NYSE:HON), manufacturer of Miller fall protection solutions, will partner with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to support a nationwide event to promote better safety on construction sites to prevent falls.

The weeklong event, National Safety Stand-Down to Prevent Falls in Construction, June 2-6, 2014, is focused on recognizing hazards and preventing falls by getting the message out to America's employers that safety pays, and falls cost.

"According to OSHA, falls account for more than a third of all deaths - the highest number of fatalities - in the U.S. construction industry," said Ravi Ramanathan, general manager, Fall Protection for Honeywell Safety Products-Americas. "Falls can be prevented with strong, enduring safety cultures that incorporate all four cornerstones of success: leadership, education, analytics and equipment."

OSHA is asking employers and workers to "stand-down," or pause their workdays during the week, to talk about fall prevention in construction, and discuss topics like ladder safety, scaffolding safety and roofing work safety.

Honeywell Safety Products will host special "Miller Fall Protection Road Shows" at companies and work sites around the United States. Miller Road Show presentations demonstrate the forces associated with falls through on-site drop tests, explain how various shock absorbers and/or deceleration devices safely arrest falls, and teach people the ABC's of fall protection. Also included are instructions on how to calculate fall clearance, updates on OSHA regulations and ANSI standards, solutions for common fall protection problems, and demonstrations of new fall protection products and systems.

In addition, the Miller brand will be featured on informational billboards promoting the National Safety Stand-Down in 30 cities around the country.

For more information about activities Honeywell Safety Products will conduct in support of the National Safety Stand-Down, please visit the following websites or contact the Honeywell Customer Care in the US at 800-430-5490, or in Canada at 888-212-7233.

OSHA National Safety Stand-Down to Prevent Falls in Construction: Stop Falls Stand Down.

Miller Fall Protection Road Shows: http://www.honeywellsafety.com/USA/roadshow.

Miller Fall Protection Solutions: http://www.millerfallprotection.com.

About Miller Fall Protection Products

Miller is a world leading brand in fall protection solutions, including: personal fall protection equipment; engineered fall arrest systems; collective fall prevention/barrier solutions; and professional services including training, audits, consulting, product inspection and repairs. For over 65 years, products labeled with the Miller brand have protected those working at height in a wide range of industries including construction, oil and gas, telecommunications, wind energy, transportation, mining, general industry, utilities and more.

About Honeywell Safety Products

Honeywell Safety Products (HSP), a global manufacturer of leading personal protective equipment (PPE) and provider of safety solutions, helps company employees make safer decisions on their own and build an enduring culture of safety. With world class brands such as Honeywell®, Uvex®, North®, Howard Leight®, Miller®, Fibre-Metal® and Servus®, HSP offers a full range of quality PPE, including: protective clothing; fall and hearing protection products; solutions that protect hands, head, feet, eyes and face; along with respiratory, welding, first-aid, lockout/tagout and traffic safety equipment. Lead them to safety-visit http://www.honeywellsafety.com culture to learn more.

About Honeywell

Honeywell (www.honeywell.com) is a Fortune 100 diversified technology and manufacturing leader, serving customers worldwide with aerospace products and services; control technologies for buildings, homes and industry; turbochargers; and performance materials. Based in Morris Township, N.J., Honeywell's shares are traded on the New York, London, and Chicago Stock Exchanges. For more news and information on Honeywell, please visit http://www.honeywellnow.com.

Terex AWP honors OSHA Safety Stand Down with tips

Access, Lift and Handlers

Written by Lindsey Anderson

May 29, 2014

In honor of OSHA's National Fall Prevention Stand-Down, June 2 - 6, Terex AWP is providing the following safety tips for operating aerial lift equipment.

"Fatalities caused by falls from elevation continue to be a leading cause of death for construction workers, accounting for 269 of the 775 construction fatalities recorded in 2012. Those deaths could have been preventable," said Scott Owyen, Global Training Manager, Terex Aerial Work Platforms (AWP).

The following operating tips are critical steps that an aerial work platform (AWP) operator can take to reduce the likelihood of a potentially deadly fall from height.

1) Make sure that you have received proper training (both general training and hands-on practical training) as well as familiarization on the AWP you will be using. Thoroughly read the operator's manual and safety signs on the machine, and understand the function and location of all safety devices and controls before beginning operation.

2) Always read, understand and obey employer's safety rules and worksite regulations, as well as all applicable local, governmental or provincial regulations that apply to AWP operation before operating the machine.

3) Always perform a pre-operation inspection and function tests on the AWP before each shift. A level sensor, alarm or any other safety device cannot do its job if it has been disabled or has malfunctioned. If the machine fails any of these tests, make sure it is immediately tagged and removed from service until it can be repaired by a qualified service technician.

4) Always perform a workplace risk assessment prior to moving the AWP to the jobsite. Look for drop-offs and holes, slopes, slippery or unstable surfaces, overhead obstacles, power lines and any other hazards that may exist. Then consciously think about and avoid those hazards through all phases of machine operation. A full list of hazards you need to be aware of can be found in the operator's manual for the machine you are operating.

5) Always wear the proper fall protection when operating either a telescopic or articulating boom. A properly fitted full body harness and appropriate lanyard or self-retracting lifeline is an absolute requirement. Most operators do not understand the potential for being catapulted from the platform of a boom. The slightest jar at the base of the machine can equate into a sudden and powerful whiplash at the platform that may have the potential to toss the operator into the air. If this were to happen, wearing the proper fall protection may reduce the chances of serious injury or even death.

6) Never sit, stand or climb on the platform guardrails for any reason. The guardrails on an AWP provide fall protection only if the operator maintains a firm footing on the platform floor at all times. If an operator is required to reach an overhead work area that is too small for the platform guardrails to allow access to, the use of a manufacturer-approved device that has been specifically designed to provide additional access to confined spaces is recommended.

7) Never exit an elevated boom or scissor lift platform unless you have been properly trained to do so, maintain 100 percent tie-off at all times, and are in possession of an approval letter from the manufacturer that provides the proper guidance.

8) Never climb down from the platform when it is raised. Whenever possible, keep a cell phone or two-way radio with you while you are in the platform. Always have a rescue plan in place in the event that the MEWP is not equipped with an auxiliary lowering system or if that system malfunctions. Rescue plans should at a minimum include steps to ensure that other personnel are aware that you are operating the MEWP and that they have been trained and familiarized to operate the machine from the ground controls.

9) Always keep the platform floor clear of debris. Scrap materials, buckets, large tool boxes and other items can cause a serious tripping hazard. You should remove any item from the platform that is not absolutely necessary to do your work. Utilize special manufacturer-approved attachments such as fluorescent tube caddies or panel cradles (where applicable) to lift large or bulky items.

10) Always lower the platform entry mid-rail or close the entry gate before operating the AWP. The entry mid-rail or gate is an integral part of the platform guardrail. Never tape or prop the entry open and never use a AWP if the gate does not properly latch.

Tennessee construction workers unite to address leading cause of work-site deaths

WorkersCompensation.com

05/29/14

Nashville, TN (WorkersCompensation.com) - On June 2, 2014, the Tennessee Occupational Safety and Health Administration (TOSHA) and construction trade associations are inviting construction industry employers to stop work to engage their employees in discussions on preventing fall-related injuries.

Called 2014 Fall Protection Safety Stand Down, employers across the state will "stand down" - that is, cease operations - at their job sites to review with their employees the fine points of fall prevention.

"The Fall Protection Safety Stand Down event is taking place at the beginning of the busiest period for construction activity," said TOSHA Administrator Steve Hawkins. "In the Stand Down training sessions, employers will stress that fall prevention is preferable to fall arrest."

Employees will provide feedback on the kinds of activities they perform that can result in fall injuries. They will learn about unprotected edges and other work-site conditions requiring fall protection measures. Suggestions to help plan a Stand Down can be found at Stop Falls Stand Down Suggestions.

Falls are the leading cause of fatalities in the construction industry, accounting for one-third of all deaths in the industry. Nationally over the past five years, construction fatalities have averaged 287 each year.

TOSHA continues to focus on the goal of reducing deaths in high-hazard industries with programs such as the Fall Protection Safety Stand Down. OSHA statistics show that weekly workplace deaths are down nationally over the past four decades from 38 a day in 1970 to 12 a day in 2012, at the same time that national employment has almost doubled.

Construction industry employers interested in taking part in Fall Protection Safety Stand Down who have not yet registered may do so by going to the Stand Down registration link on the TOSHA Website homepage at http://www.tn.gov/workforce. A PowerPoint presentation is available to assist employers with the Stand Down training. If you have questions about the Stand Down program, contact Larry Hunt, Tennessee OSHA, at Email Larry Hunt or (615) 741-7036.

In addition to TOSHA, the following partner organizations are supporting Fall Protection Safety Stand Down this year:

  • Associated Builders and Contractors
  • Associated General Contractors of Tennessee
  • American Society of Safety Engineers
  • Home Builders Association of Tennessee
  • Plumbing-Heating-Cooling Contractors Association
  • Tennessee Road Builders Association
  • Volunteer State Community College
  • Southeastern OSHA Training Institute

Spate of fatalities prompts Cal/OSHA to target construction sites

EHS Today

By Josh Cable

May 29, 2014

A spate of worker deaths has prompted Cal/OSHA to target construction sites in the San Francisco Bay Area. Agency compliance officers will inspect construction sites to determine whether employers have implemented adequate safety measures.

The agency points to four recent incidents at California construction sites, all of which are under investigation:

  • On May 21, a worker at a residential project in San Jose died when he fell from a three-story building.
  • On May 20, a worker at a San Mateo construction project died when he tumbled nine feet from a wall, sustaining fatal head injuries.
  • On May 20, a worker near the top of 22-foot rebar column at a San Diego construction site was killed when the column fell on him.
  • On May 18, a construction worker was killed when the train bridge he was dismantling in downtown Riverside collapsed, crushing him.

"Construction sites present special challenges to worker safety," said Christine Baker, director of the Department of Industrial Relations, which oversees Cal/OSHA. "Employers need to have strong safety programs in place and train their workers to follow procedures."

Focus on Fall Hazards
Hazards at construction sites include open trenches and moving equipment at ground level, but elevated areas are especially dangerous, Cal/OSHA noted. Falls are the No. 1 cause of workplace deaths in the construction industry.

OSHA has designated June 2-6 as National Safety Stand-Down Week to encourage employers to talk with workers about fall hazards and prevention. Cal/OSHA has posted an industry-specific fall protection fact sheet on its website, and the agency will be participating with federal OSHA in a series of safety stand-down events at construction sites across the state to emphasize the importance of fall protection and other safety measures.

"Our goal is to raise awareness for everyone working in construction that hazards can be identified and corrected," said acting Cal/OSHA chief Juliann Sum. "Preparation and vigilance are vital to preventing workplace fatalities."

"Cited and Fined! Employers Are Discovering OSHA Is Serious About Eliminating Falls"

Fall protection - from railings on buildings to personal devices such as hooks that attach to vests - will be among the items that Cal/OSHA compliance officers will be checking during their inspections, the agency said.

Cal/OSHA's teams also will examine trench safety, equipment safety and potential site hazards such as power lines.

If inspectors find a lack of protection or a serious hazard, they can stop work at the site until the hazards are addressed, the agency noted. Employers that fail to comply with Cal/OSHA safety regulations will be cited and ordered to correct the violations.

Labor to hold 'safety stand-down' to fight construction deaths

The Hill

By Tim Devaney

05/30/14 01:46 PM EDT

The Labor Department is encouraging construction workers to take a break next week to focus on workplace safety issues.

Tens of thousands of construction companies and more than 1 million employees have agreed to spend one day next week learning about how they could prevent workplace hazards, developing rescue plans and conducting safety equipment inspections.

The Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is hosting a safety stand-down from June 2 through June 6 with this year's focus on fall hazards.

"A safety stand-down is a voluntary event for employers to talk directly to employees about safety," OSHA said in a statement about the event. "This year we are focusing on 'Fall Hazards' and to reinforce the importance of 'Fall Prevention.'"

According to OSHA, falling from buildings continues to be a leading cause of death among construction workers. In 2012, the agency recorded 775 construction-related deaths, of which 269 were from falls.

"Lack of fall protection is the most frequently cited OSHA violation, proving that these deaths are preventable when employers provide the right safety equipment and properly train workers how to use it," OSHA said.

Labor Secretary Thomas Perez and OSHA Director David Michaels will kick off the safety stand-offs during an event on Monday.

Get ready for OSHA's stand-down for fall prevention

Safety.BLR.com

May 30, 2014

OSHA is holding a weeklong, voluntary event as part of its ongoing fall prevention campaign started in 2012. The safety stand-down, scheduled for June 2-6, is intended to raise awareness among employers and workers about the hazards of falls, which are the leading cause of deaths in the construction industry. Keep reading to learn what's involved and how your workers can benefit.

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OSHA is asking construction employers and workers to pause their workday to discuss topics like ladder safety, scaffolding safety, and roofing work safety. The agency is hoping to attract participation by 25,000 employers and 500,000 workers. If that happens, the stand-down will have touched nearly 1 out of 10 construction workers in the U.S.

How can you participate in OSHA's safety stand-down?
Businesses can conduct a stand-down by taking a break for a toolbox talk, safety equipment inspection, review of rescue plans, or discussion of specific job hazards. OSHA encourages employers to plan events that meet the needs and culture of their workplaces. Other ideas include the following:

  • Schedule a worksite walkaround to identify hazards and abatements.
  • Plan a lunch-and-learn session with an internal or outside safety expert.
  • Put up special signage to reinforce the fall protection message and your company's commitment.
  • Send out an eblast with fall protection reminders.
  • Sponsor a quiz among work crews featuring a daily question and answer. Offer a small prize or pizza lunch for the winning team.
  • Ask for employee suggestions on ways to prevent falls at job sites and implement and reward the best ideas.
  • Consider focusing on one fall hazard each day of the week (e.g., falls from ladders, falls from a scaffold, falls through a floor, falls down stairs, and falls from a roof).

OSHA has created a dedicated website, at Stop Falls Stand Down Resources, with information about how to prevent falls, provide the right equipment, and train employees in its proper use. Employers can offer feedback about their stand-down events and download certificates of participation from June 2 through July 15.

U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration to host safety program on Monday

Tuscaloosa News

Staff Report

May 30, 2014

The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration will hold a fall safety training program Monday at Nucor Steel Tuscaloosa, 700 Holt Road NE. OSHA said about 400 workers from several companies are expected to attend.

A statement from OSHA said falls are the leading cause of death in the construction industry and accounted for 12 percent of all occupational injuries in 2012.

AMR's 16 recycling facilities stand down for fall prevention

Sedalia Weekly Observer (Missouri)

May 30, 2014

Advantage Metals Recycling (AMR) is pleased to announce its participation in OSHA's National Safety Stand Down for Fall Prevention. During the week of June 2, every AMR recycling facility will conduct daily field-based safety meetings focusing on key aspects of fall prevention. This includes fall hazard recognition, choosing the proper fall prevention systems, ladder safety, maintaining three-point contact, preventing slips/trips/falls on the same level and a focused review of personal fall arrest gear.

AMR appreciates OSHA's efforts in organizing this event. We support such outreach initiatives that greatly enhance cooperation between the agency and employers to work toward the same goal: a safe and healthful workplace.

AMR buys common household ferrous and nonferrous scrap metal items like automobiles, appliances, sheet metal, aluminum cans and other aluminum, copper and brass products. State-of-the-art technology is utilized to allow customers to quickly and efficiently recycle their scrap metal and receive payment on site.

AMR operates 16 scrap metal recycling locations across Kansas and Missouri. Advantage Metals Recycling is wholly owned by The David J. Joseph Company (DJJ), a subsidiary of Nucor Corporation. The David Joseph Company, founded in 1885, is one of the largest scrap brokers/processors in the United States providing scrap brokerage, recycling and transportation services. Nucor and affiliates are manufacturers of steel products, with operating facilities primarily in the U.S. and Canada.

More than 1M workers expected to "Stand-Down" for Fall Safety

ForConstructionPros.com

May 30, 2014

Tens of thousands of employers and more than 1 million workers across the country are joining the Occupational Safety and Health Administration from June 2 - 6 in safety stand-downs to focus on saving lives and preventing fatalities from falls in the construction industry.

Falls are the leading cause of death in construction and more than 300 workers lost their lives in falls during 2012. Lack of fall protection is the most frequently cited OSHA violation, proving that these deaths are preventable when employers provide the right safety equipment and properly train workers how to use it.

As a part of the Stand-Down, a record number of companies and workers around the country are voluntarily stopping work to talk about fall prevention. Stand-Down participants are encouraged to share their experiences on Twitter by using #StandDown4Safety and tagging @USDOL

"The economy is on the rebound, housing starts are on the rise and the summer construction season is getting underway. Now is the time to focus on this vital safety issue and make sure all construction workers come home at the end of every workday," said U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez.

Throughout the week-long Stand-Down, employers and workers will pause during their workday to focus on the hazards of falls and preventing them. Industry and business leaders, including universities, labor organizations, and community and faith-based groups, have scheduled stand-downs in all 50 states and across the world. For example, the University of Texas at Arlington is joining OSHA staff and Balfour Beatty Construction to kick off events across the state of Texas today. Clark Construction Group LLC will also host a stand-down at the Stanford University Medical Center in Palo Alto, California. While on Wednesday, June 4, NASCAR race car driver Greg Biffle will be at the Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Florida, to demonstrate fall protection at the facility, which is currently under construction. In addition, the U.S. Air Force will be hosting fall stand-downs at bases worldwide.

The National Safety stand down is part of OSHA's fall prevention campaign, launched two years ago with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, NIOSH's National Occupational Research Agenda and The Center for Construction Research and Training.

The National Safety Stand-Down Web page provides details on: how to conduct a stand-down; receive a certificate of participation; and access free education and training resources, fact sheets and other outreach materials in English and Spanish. For a list of stand-down events free and open to the public, please visit the Stand-Down calendar of events. This is not a comprehensive list of all events taking place across the country.

Participate in National Safety Stand-Down with OSHAcampus.com

IT Business Net

May 31, 2014

Residential construction companies that have employees exposed to fall hazards are encouraged to participate in the National Safety Stand-Down campaign this June 2-6, 2014.

The purpose of this voluntary event is for employers to be able to converse with their employees about fall hazards and raise awareness for fall prevention.

Falls are a leading source of death for workers. In 2012, 269 out of 775 fatalities of construction workers were from falls. Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health, Dr. David Michaels says that, "Falls account for more than a third of all deaths in this industry. We're working with employers, workers, industry groups, state OSH plans, and civic and faith-based organizations to host safety stand-downs that focus on recognizing hazards and preventing falls. We are getting the message out to America's employers that safety pays and falls cost."

Work may be paused for the day while construction companies conduct a toolbox talk or related safety activities. Construction safety discussions may include ladder safety, proper use of fall protection equipment and related company safety policies.

Construction industry safety standards must guarantee that employees working six feet or more above lower levels use guardrails, safety nets, or personal fall arrest systems. In certain locales, the requirement is at four feet per state OSH plans. Employees are advised to also take OSHA 10-Hour and 30-Hour Outreach Training for construction.

OSHAcampus.com is an OSHA approved course provider for self-paced, online OSHA 10-Hour and 30-Hour Outreach Training for construction. The courses are created for safety managers, safety trainers and construction employees. Upon enrollment, Outreach Training courses for construction will tackle the recognition, avoidance and prevention of workplace hazards, including falls. The OSHA 10-Hour is designed for entry level workers while OSHA 30-Hour is for employees with safety responsibility.

OSHAs goal is to have over 25,000 employers and 500,000 workers involved in the Stand-Down. This will amount to almost 1 out of 10 construction workers in the country. Employers may download Certificates of Participation to give to their workers on June 2 thru July 15, 2014, following their stand-down.

The National Safety Stand-Down is part of OSHAs Fall Prevention Campaign. The campaign gives employers the right tools and facts in order to prevent falls and have the best equipment suited for such work.

OSHA is partnering with key groups to help with this endeavor, including the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), OSHA approved State Plans, State consultation programs, the Center for Construction Research and Training (CPWR), the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE), the National Safety Council, and the OSHA Training Institute (OTI) Education Centers.

Nationwide fall prevention emphasis kicks off Monday

Tri-City Herald (Kennewick, Wash.)

June 1, 2014

The Washington State Department of Labor & Industries and the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration are encouraging employers to talk about the importance of preventing falls this week.

The "Safety Stand-Down" being held Monday through Friday because falls cause the highest number of deaths among construction workers nationally and more than half of all worker hospitalizations in the state.

"Preventable falls - whether from rooftops, ladders or slips and trips - cause many disabling injuries and a number of deaths in our state each year," said Anne Soiza, assistant director of the Department of Labor & Industries' occupational safety and health division, in a statement. "We hope that every employer in the state will set aside time during the Stand-Down to focus on fall prevention."

Officials are urging employers and workers to talk about fall hazards at work and how to prevent them this week. The Department of Labor & Industries has created one-minute "Eye on Safety" videos, available at www.EyeOnSafety.info, to help with the discussion.

More training resources are available at www.lni.wa.gov/safety/.

National stand-down for fall safety (audio transcript)

KAUZ-TV (Wichita Falls, Texas)

June 1, 2014

More than one-million workers across the country are expected to "stand-down" for fall safety this week. They will join the Occupational Safety and Health Administration from Monday to Friday. They will focus on saving lives and preventing fatalities from falls in the construction industry. Falls are the leading cause of death in construction. More than three-hundred workers lost their lives in 2012. As part of the "stand-down" companies and workers will voluntarily stop work to host safety events on how to prevent these fatalities.

National stand-down for fall safety (audio transcript)

KLAS-LV (Las Vegas, NV)

June 1, 2014

All work will stop at the S-L-S Las Vegas construction site from 12:30 to 1 tomorrow afternoon. It's an effort to call attention to worker Safety and preventing construction falls. This is all part of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's national fall prevention stand-down week. OSHA says falls are the leading cause of construction worker deaths. 500 people are working on the S-L-S project which is set to open Labor Day weekend.

1 million+ 'standing down' against falls in construction

Better Roads

June 1, 2014

Tina Grady Barbaccia

More than 1 million workers from tens of thousands of businesses are expected to take part in the Occupational Health and Safety Administration's (OSHA) National Fall Safety Stand Down this week.

Throughout the week-long Stand-Down, employers and workers will pause during their workday to focus on the hazards of falls and preventing them. Industry and business leaders, including universities, labor organizations and community and faith-based groups, have scheduled stand-downs in all 50 states and across the world.

Falls are the leading cause of death in the construction industry, with hundreds of workers dying each year and thousands more facing serious injuries, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

Lack of fall protection is also the most frequently cited OSHA violation, which really boils down to the fact that these deaths are preventable when employers provide the right safety equipment and properly train workers how to use it.

Throughout this week, "a record number of companies and workers around the country" are voluntarily stopping work to talk about fall prevention, according to the DOL. The government agency is encouraging Stand-Down participants to share their experiences on Twitter by using #StandDown4Safety and tagging @USDOL.

U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez says everyone has banded together to join the campaign "to save lives and prevent fatal falls in the construction industry."

Perez says the economy is on the rebound, housing starts are on the rise and the summer construction season is getting underway.

"Now is the time to focus on this vital safety issue and make sure all construction workers come home at the end of every workday," Perez says in a written statement.
Hear Perez discuss the Stand-Down in the included video.

Some participants in this initiative, the DOL says, include the following:

Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Dr. David Michaels points out that "falls cause immense pain and suffering when they happen, and we must do everything we can to stop them."

However, he says, "the good news is that they are preventable with three easy steps: the best protection is to plan ahead, ensure workers have the right equipment and train each worker to use it."

It's great to see such a strong stance on safety. I'll be teaching my boys about transportation safety on Thursday evening. (Our local Safety Town is having a practice bike ride on its enclosed streets to teach children about safely navigating the roadways on their bikes.)

Note: This week's National Safety stand down is part of OSHA's fall prevention campaign, launched two years ago with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, NIOSH's National Occupational Research Agenda and The Center for Construction Research and Training.

Here is some useful information from the DOL:

The National Safety Stand-Down web page provides details on how to conduct a stand-down; receive a certificate of participation; and access free education and training resources, fact sheets and other outreach materials in English and Spanish.

For a list of stand-down events free and open to the public, visit the Stand-Down calendar of events. This is not a comprehensive list of all events taking place across the country.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA's role is to ensure these conditions for America's working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance.

Obama administration emphasizes fall protection

Washington Post

By Associated Press, Published: June 2

WASHINGTON - More than 1 million U.S. workers and over 25,000 businesses are expected to participate in "safety stand-downs" in all 50 states this week to emphasize the importance of workplace safety and guarding against falls, the Obama administration said Monday.

"The economy is on the rebound, housing starts are on the rise and the summer construction season is getting underway. Now is the time to focus on this vital safety issue and make sure all construction workers come home at the end of every workday," Labor Secretary Thomas E. Perez told a news media conference call.

Falls are the leading cause of death in the construction industry. Almost 300 construction workers died in falls in 2012 and thousands more were injured, Perez said.

The Labor Department said 2012 statistics were used because they were the most up-to-date, confirmable ones available.

And it's not just the construction industry, Perez added. "Fatal falls and injuries touch workers in all kinds of jobs across the country."

The National Fall Safety Stand-Down was being organized by the Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). During the week-long observance, companies and workers are being asked to pause at some point during their workdays to talk about hazards of falls and how to prevent them.

David Michaels, the assistant labor secretary who heads OSHA, said the "lack of fall protection" is the most-frequently cited OSHA violation.

He said the various events this week would emphasize "common-sense" steps necessary to prevent such mishaps. "Young workers, new workers, temporary workers are all especially vulnerable," Michaels said. "We want to make sure that no one's first day on the job is their last."

"We emphasize planning ahead and providing the right equipment: Guard rails, safety harnesses, lines and anchors. And training all employees. These simple steps can save lives," Michaels said.
Among the planned activities:

-The U.S. Air Force will host fall stand-down events at their bases world-wide throughout the week.

-At the Daytona International Speedway in Florida, now undergoing extensive renovation, NASCA race car driver Greg Biffle will demonstrate fall protection on Wednesday by strapping on a "fall-arrest system" harness with hundreds of construction workers.

-Events at construction sites across Texas were being held Monday.

-Clark Construction Group was hosting a stand-down at the Stanford University Center in Palo Alto, Calif.

OSHA Spreads Workplace Safety Message in Auburn

Time Warner Cable News (Syracuse, N.Y.)

By: Bill Carey

6/02/2014 05:22 PM

AUBURN, N.Y. -- It took an hour, but federal officials are hoping it will save lives. It's an effort to take construction workers off the job for 60 minutes to focus on workplace safety.

This year, the emphasis is on deaths and injuries due to on the job falls.

"We're losing 12 people every day on the job. And, specific to the construction industry, we're losing four workers every day on the job," said Ronald Williams, an OSHA compliance assistance specialist.

OSHA finds that by reaching out to workers, they help spread the word on just what the regulations are and make it more likely the rules will be enforced, Williams said.

"Getting the word to them to make sure when they plan the work out, before they start the work, so that they don't have the accidents on the job sites that are occurring," he said.

Williams spoke with workers at NUCOR, an Auburn steel mill where officials said they welcome the focus on important issues.

"OSHA is educating and we feel that education is extremely important in safety. They're using what they know to educate people to prevent injury and prevent hazards, and that's what safety is all about," said Mary Emily Slate, NUCOR's general manager and vice president.

While some companies dread OSHA visits, Slate said NUCOR always welcomes the attention.

"At NUCOR we're focused on an injury-free workplace because we believe you can come in every single day and you can work injury free. That allows you to take care of your family and it allows us to take care of our business," Slate said.

The nationwide effort is aimed at focusing other companies and workers on the same issues.

National stand-down for fall safety (audio transcript)

WTIC-TV (Hartford/New Haven, Conn.)

June 2, 2014

Employees from the Connecticut Department of Labor's Division of Occupational Safety and Health will help kick off "National Fall Prevention Week" in this state. Conn-OSHA director Kenneth Tucker will join DOT employees at the Torrington maintenance garage this morning for tailgate a talk. Last Friday, a construction worker died in Windsor after being injured on the job.

National stand-down for fall safety (audio transcript)

KPLC-TV (Lafayette, La.)

June 2, 2014

Falls are the leading cause of death in construction work and more than 300 workers lost their lives in falls during 2012. More than one million workers across the country are joining the Occupational Safety and Health Administration this week in a Safety Stand-Down. A teleconference at noon will kick off the week long series of events. U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez and Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Dr. David Michaels will take part in the conversation. Join in on the conversation on Twitter using the hash tag #StandDown4Safety.

OSHA Fall Safety Stand-Down event

Green Bay (Wis.) Press Gazette

June 2, 2014

OSHA Fall Safety Stand-Down event: 6 a.m. June 2, Lambeau Field (northeast side), 1265 Lombardi Ave., Green Bay. More than 200 workers are expected to attend the training to review proper safety precautions to prevent falls. The stand-down is being coordinated through the Appleton Area OSHA office. Persons interested in attending, call (920) 969-7077.

Infographic: Are you doing your part to prevent fall injuries?

Safety.BLR.com

June 2, 2014

Falls are the top cause of worker deaths in construction, and from June 2-6, OSHA is hosting a stand-down to raise awareness among employers and workers about the hazards of falls. Share this infographic this week to join the effort to stop falls in construction.

Embed this infographic on your site:

http://safety.blr.com/images/infographics/FallInjuries.png

Are You Doing Your Part to Prevent Fall Injuries? by Safety.BLR.com

Workers standing down for fall safety

Today's Facility Manager

June 2, 2014

Posted by Heidi Schwartz

Tens of thousands of employers and more than one million workers across the country are joining the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) from June 2 - 6 in safety stand-downs to focus on saving lives and preventing fatalities from falls in the construction industry. As a part of the Stand-Down, companies and workers will voluntarily stop work to host safety events focusing on how to prevent these fatalities.

Falls are the leading cause of death in construction, and more than 300 workers lost their lives in falls during 2012. Lack of fall protection is the most frequently cited OSHA violation, proving that these deaths are preventable when employers provide the right safety equipment and properly train workers how to use it.

U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez and Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Dr. David Michaels are kicking off this week-long series of events on Monday, June 2, 2014.

Government kicks off week of events emphasizing worker protection from deadly on-the-job falls

Greenfield (Ind.) Daily Reporter

By TOM RAUM Associated Press

June 2, 2014

WASHINGTON - More than 1 million U.S. workers and over 25,000 businesses are expected to participate in "safety stand-downs" in all 50 states this week to emphasize the importance of workplace safety and guarding against falls, the Obama administration said Monday.

"The economy is on the rebound, housing starts are on the rise and the summer construction season is getting underway. Now is the time to focus on this vital safety issue and make sure all construction workers come home at the end of every workday," Labor Secretary Thomas E. Perez told a news media conference call.

Falls are the leading cause of death in the construction industry. Almost 300 construction workers died in falls in 2012 and thousands more were injured, Perez said.

The Labor Department said 2012 statistics were used because they were the most up-to-date, confirmable ones available.

And it's not just the construction industry, Perez added. "Fatal falls and injuries touch workers in all kinds of jobs across the country."

The National Fall Safety Stand-Down was being organized by the Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). During the week-long observance, companies and workers are being asked to pause at some point during their workdays to talk about hazards of falls and how to prevent them.

David Michaels, the assistant labor secretary who heads OSHA, said the "lack of fall protection" is the most-frequently cited OSHA violation.

He said the various events this week would emphasize "common-sense" steps necessary to prevent such mishaps. "Young workers, new workers, temporary workers are all especially vulnerable," Michaels said. "We want to make sure that no one's first day on the job is their last." "We emphasize planning ahead and providing the right equipment: Guard rails, safety harnesses, lines and anchors. And training all employees. These simple steps can save lives," Michaels said.

Among the planned activities:

  • The U.S. Air Force will host fall stand-down events at their bases world-wide throughout the week.
  • At the Daytona International Speedway in Florida, now undergoing extensive renovation, NASCA race car driver Greg Biffle will demonstrate fall protection on Wednesday by strapping on a "fall-arrest system" harness with hundreds of construction workers.
  • Events at construction sites across Texas were being held Monday.
  • Clark Construction Group was hosting a stand-down at the Stanford University Center in Palo Alto, California

Tips for a successful Fall Prevention Stand-Down

EHS Today

Josh Cable

June 2, 2014

A stand-down is a break in the workday to raise awareness of jobsite hazards. OSHA explains that employers can use the time to conduct toolbox talks, equipment inspections, rescue planning or other safety activities.

With the focus on fall prevention this week, OSHA offers the following suggestions for conducting a successful fall prevention stand-down:

  1. Try to start early. Designate a coordinator to organize the stand-down. If you have multiple worksites, identify the team that will lead the stand-down at each site.
  2. Consider asking your subcontractors, owner, architects, engineers or others associated with your project to participate in the stand-down.
  3. Consider reviewing your fall prevention program. This will help provide a more effective stand-down.
    1. What types of falls could happen?
      • Falls from ladders
      • Falls from a roof
      • Falls from a scaffold
      • Falls down stairs
      • Falls from a structural steel
      • Falls through a floor or roof opening
      • Falls through a fragile roof surface
    2. What needs improvement? Is your program meeting its goals? Are you experiencing fatalities, injuries, or near misses? Are employees aware of the company's fall protection procedures?
    3. What training have you provided to your workers? Does it need revision?
    4. What equipment have you provided to your workers? Is better equipment available?
  4. Develop presentations or activities that will meet your needs. Decide what information will be best for your workplace and workers. The meeting should provide information to workers about hazards, protective methods, and the company's safety policies, goals and expectations. Hands-on exercises (a worksite walkaround, equipment checks, etc.) can increase retention.
  5. Decide when to hold the stand-down and how long it will last. Decide if the stand-down will take place over a break, a lunch period or some other time.
  6. Promote the stand-down. Try to make it interesting to workers. Some employers find that serving snacks increases participation.
  7. Hold your stand-down. Try to make it positive and interactive. Let workers talk about their experiences and encourage them to make suggestions.
  8. Follow up. If you learned something that could improve your fall prevention program, consider making changes.

OSHA hosting fall safety classes in Des Moines

Des Moines (Iowa) Register

Matthew Patane

June 2, 2014

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration will host two sessions for construction workers this week for safety training intended to prevent additional falls at workplaces.

The Des Moines Area OSHA office is coordinating the "Fall Safety Stand-Down" events, which include classroom training and fall and rescue demonstrations. The classes and safety demonstrations are for construction workers.

Training will take place on the following days:

  • Tuesday at 9 a.m. at the Veterans Administration Hospital, 3600 30th St. in Des Moines
  • Thursday from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Polk County River Place, 2309 W. Euclid Ave. in Des Moines.

Safety stand-down to prevent construction falls; six workers die in Kentucky each year

KyForward (Lexington, Ky.)

June 2, 2014

The Kentucky Labor Cabinet joins the National Safety Stand-Down to Prevent Falls in Construction this week. The event is designed to raise awareness among employers and workers about the hazards of falls, and is a voluntary event for employers to talk directly to employees about protection.

"The stand-down is an opportunity for employers to take some time during the work week to pause and talk about fall protection and prevention," said Labor Cabinet Secretary Larry Roberts. "Companies should gather employees and discuss topics such as ladder safety, scaffolding safety and roofing work safety."

Falls are the most common fatal hazard in the construction industry, accounting for nearly half the construction deaths in Kentucky. On average, about six Kentucky workers die each year from workplace falls, and there are about 3,800 non-fatal workplace falls in all industries that result in days away from work.

To learn how to partner with the Labor Cabinet in this stand-down, visit labor and click on the 2014 Fall Prevention icon. The page provides details on how to conduct a stand-down, be acknowledged for participation, and access free education and training resources, fact sheets and other outreach materials in English and Spanish.

Companies that are participating in the stand-down are encouraged to click on the "Stand Up and Be Recognized" icon to register. Some participating partners include the Associated General Contractors of Kentucky; Congleton-Hacker Company; Scott, Murphy & Daniel; Skanska USA; and Walsh Construction.

The Labor Cabinet's Division of Education and Training will hold training sessions at various stand-down events in Kentucky. Some of the sites include Commonwealth Stadium in Lexington on Monday, June 2, from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Metalsa Truck Plant in Elizabethtown on Wednesday, June 4, from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.; and Embassy Suites in Louisville on Friday, June 6, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. These events are free and open to the public.

The Labor Cabinet is working in conjunction with the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration's efforts to raise awareness for fall prevention. Each year in the United States, falls kill more than 200 construction workers and seriously injure 10,000 more.

For information on the national initiative, visit stopfalls. For more details on fall prevention, visit stopconstructionfalls.

AGC California promotes fall prevention safety

SprayFoam.com

June 2, 2014

SACRAMENTO, CA - June 2, 2014 - Demonstrating its strong commitment to jobsite safety and its support of the ongoing National Construction Fall Prevention week, several AGC member companies like Swinerton, Unger Construction Company, Clark / McCarthy, and Hensel Phelps will host safety awareness events in partnership with Cal/OSHA to raise awareness of the specific hazards of falls from ladders, scaffold and roofs and how to prevent them.

Falls currently rank as the number one cause of death in the construction industry, yet they are preventable with proper training, awareness, and jobsite practices. In 2012, falls accounted for 269 of the 779 construction fatalities nationwide. In a concerted effort to improve those statistics, AGC member contractors are leading the way by partnering with OSHA, Cal/OSHA, NIOSH and NORA to support the third annual National Safety Stand-Down to Prevent Falls in Construction campaign.

AGC-member employers take a proactive stance every day to improving safety in the construction industry. In support of this Fall Prevention Stand-Down initiative, they are working diligently with OSHA and other agencies to make a difference by reducing and eliminating preventable deaths and injuries resulting from falls.

"Falls are completely preventable with the right planning and training. That is why AGC took the lead in working with Federal and Cal/OSHA to coordinate these jobsite 'stand-downs' that would be used for future fall prevention campaigns," said AGC of California CEO Tom Holsman. "Together with regulators, industry and labor we can minimize the risk, raise awareness and eliminate such fatalities and injuries in our industry."

About AGC of California:Founded in 1920, The Associated General Contractors of California proudly continues to be an organization of responsible construction firms and industry-related companies dedicated to skill and integrity in improving our physical environment.The mission of the Associated General Contractors of California is to be the recognized leader in providing business opportunities, education, training, resources, and advocacy for its members while advancing sound public policy for the construction industry. For more information on AGC and the Third Annual National Construction Fall Prevention week, please use the contact information and links provided below.

Fastenal & Capital Safety Join Together To Promote Stand-Down Week

Industrial Distribution

June 2, 2014

Winona, MN - Fastenal and Capital Safety have joined together in promoting the Occupational Safety & Health Administration's campaign against falls in construction, called Stand-Down. The campaign will be held June 2 through 6 and it is focused on decreasing the number of fatalities in the construction industry due to falls.

"Fastenal is a strong safety partner with great focus on worker safety" said Andrew Zimmerman, National Account Manager at Capital Safety. The OSHA Stand-Down for Fall Prevention is a great opportunity to refocus our customers on working at heights. Capital Safety is excited to leverage our everyday mission of bringing every worker at height home safely with partners like Fastenal."

According to U.S. Department of Labor, out of the 775 fatalities in construction in 2012, 269 of them were from falls. All of those deaths could have been prevented.

"We encourage and assist many of our customers with routine component inspection as a means of insuring the components in use are in good working order" said Brent Roeder, Director of Safety Sales for Fastenal. "We stand ready to support our customers' needs for training and education to insure workers return home safely."

For more information on OSHA's Stand-Down Week, visit osha.gov or contact the safety team at safetysales@fastenal.com.

OSHA conducts stand-down day for job falls

Environmental Expert

June 3, 2014

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Falls are the leading cause of death in the construction industry, and they accounted for 12 percent of all occupational injuries in 2012. In an effort to prevent these injuries and fatalities through education and outreach, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration launches the 2014 Fall Safety Stand-Down, which will be held from June 2-6. An estimated 1 million workers and 25,000 businesses, including construction industry leaders, will halt their work for one hour during that week to discuss the importance of recognizing fall hazards and implementing fall safety measures.

Turner Construction Co. will be a part of this nationwide effort on Tuesday, June 3 beginning at 11:30 a.m. EDT. More than 50 workers are expected to attend the training stand down to review proper safety precautions to prevent falls including a product demonstration. The stand-down is being coordinated by Turner Construction Co. and the Columbus Area OSHA office.

'Falls account for more than a third of all deaths in the construction industry,' said Dr. David Michaels, assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health. 'One fall can cost an employer their business and a worker their life. Every person participating in these events is showing their commitment to preventing a senseless loss of life and livelihood.'

The stand-down is part of OSHA's ongoing Fall Prevention Campaign, which was started in 2012 and was developed in partnership with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and NIOSH's National Occupational Research Agenda program.

OSHA conducts stand-down day for job falls

Mid-Hudson (N.Y.) News

June 3, 2014

MID-HUDSON - On any given day, a dozen workers nationwide are killed on the job as the result of falls.

In an effort to eliminate that hazard, the US Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration will conduct a voluntary stand-down day at job sites across the country including in the Mid-Hudson Valley, on Friday.

Workers on the job, including at locations in Wappingers Falls and Gardiner, will be instructed as to how they can minimize the risk of falling, said regional OSHA Director Robert Kulick.

"We want to make sure that every employer plans ahead before the job starts to determine if there are any fall hazards and if so, then train the workers on the personal protective equipment they may need to wear, provide that, and that will prevent the falls from happening," Kulick said.

Workers at a construction site on River Road in Wappingers Falls and on Route 208 in Gardiner will be given a brief lesson on fall safety during the national event this coming Friday.

Statement by Dr. David Michaels Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health

Insurance News Net

June 3, 2014

WASHINGTON, June 2 -- The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued the following statement by David Michaels, Assistant Secretary for Occupational Safety and Health:

Thank you all for joining us as we talk about this important nationwide event. This week, across the country, employers and workers are voluntarily stopping work to focus on achieving safe working conditions and saving workers' lives by preventing fatal falls. With this stand-down, we are reaching more workers, more businesses, and a wider variety of workplaces than ever before. Falls are the leading cause of death in the construction industry-279 workers lost their lives in 2012 in falls from heights and more than 8,800 construction workers were seriously injured by falls. Lack of fall protection is also the most frequently cited OSHA violation. These falls cause enormous pain and suffering-and we must do everything we can to prevent them.

As Secretary Perez mentioned, we are thrilled to be joining with 25,000 businesses across the country in this unprecedented partnership to raise awareness among employers and workers about the hazards of falls - and the common sense steps necessary to prevent these tragedies. The reach of this effort is unprecedented with more than 1 million workers expected to participate in stand-down events in all 50 states.

During this week, OSHA is partnering with the Associated General Contracts, the Associated Builders and Contractors, the National Association of Home Builders, the National Roofing Contractors Association, the Steel Erection Association, over ten International Unions including the Carpenters, the Laborers Union, the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, the Ironworkers Union , CPWR, - The Center for Construction Research and Training, the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, State OSHA programs in all parts of the country, community organizations, faith based organizations, universities and many other organizations nationwide.

There are hundreds of events happening all across the country this week. Here are just a few: Tomorrow in Palo Alto, California, Clark Construction will be hosting a stand-down at the Stanford University Medical Center with OSHA bay area staff.

On Wednesday, OSHA's Deputy Assistant Secretary will be out on Daytona Speedway in Daytona Beach, Florida with racecar driver Greg Biffle to do a fall protection harness demonstration with hundreds of construction workers -emphasizing the need to provide the right equipment to prevent deadly falls. In Nebraska, our Omaha staff is teaming with the Heartland Workers Center to host a free fall prevention program for the public at the Our Lady of Guadalupe Church.

And in Dorchester, Massachusetts, the YouthBuild Boston group will be hosting a stand-down with our Braintree area office to reach out to under-served young people; young and new workers are especially vulnerable - and we want to a make sure that no one's first day on the job is their last.

Our Honolulu Area Director will join Nordic PCL Construction for a stand-down event at their condominium project, and there will be other events across five different islands covering fall protection, ladder safety, inspecting fall gear, and wearing gear properly.

In Kentucky, a series of stand downs are expected to attract more than 700 attendees, including the Commissioner of Workplace Standards, Anthony Russell and Deputy Secretary Rocky Comito.

Maryland OSHA has organized a series of six events across the state; in fact so many people called to register that the organizers had to add more activities to accommodate this high demand.

There are also dozens of outdoor billboards across the country promoting stand-downs locally, including in Connecticut, Pennsylvania and Arizona. And just a few days ago, I received an email from a solar panel farm-out in the Mojave Desert-who thanked us for what we're doing. They were excited to tell us about the stand-down they've organized with more than 2,000 skilled craft workers they have on site.

This week's stand-down grew out of our Fall Prevention Campaign. We first kicked off the campaign in 2012 in partnership with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and representatives of labor and management groups like the National Occupational Research Agenda and CPWR

We started this campaign together because, as Secretary Perez said, year after year falls are the leading cause of death for construction workers. Hundreds of workers die in falls every year - and thousands more are seriously injured and disabled. The campaign focuses on falls from roofs, ladders and scaffolds, which accounted for more than a third of all fall fatalities in the construction industry in 2012. And these injuries and deaths--- these tragedies -- are preventable. Our message is "safety pays and falls cost." We emphasize planning ahead and providing the right equipment- such as guard rails or safety harnesses, lines and anchors, and training all employees. These simple steps can save lives. Whether working on roofs or scaffolds, climbing ladders, or performing any work from heights - falls can be prevented with the right equipment and training.

In stand-down events across the country this week our partners will be using the materials we produced over the last few years, including what we call "toolbox talks," which supervisors can follow to train their workers on fall prevention requirements. Our materials are in English, Spanish, Portuguese, and Russian, and include posters, factsheets, safety videos, stickers and web materials.

These materials use plain language and clear illustrations to ensure that workers get the information they need. Providing effective training in a language and vocabulary workers understand and complying with OSHA's fall prevention requirements is critical to preventing falls.

All of our materials reinforce our message that Safety Pays and Falls Cost. Falls are devastating enough - the toll they take on workers, families, coworkers, and communities - and all that without considering that workers compensation costs from one serious fall could put a small company out of business.

The nation's largest provider of workers compensation data-the National Council on Compensation Insurance-found that falls from heights in construction can result in such serious injuries that the average workers compensation cost to employers is close to $100,000 per case. OSHA doesn't want to see any worker or any company suffer because they didn't have the information they needed to prevent fatal falls and serious injuries. OSHA wants businesses to protect their bottom line, and employers to keep workers safe.

As you've heard us mention several times, the number of businesses and workers partnering with OSHA in this week's events is unprecedented and we want the impact to be unmatched as well - our goal this week is to save more lives and prevent more injuries than ever before. We're bringing everyone together for this National Stand-down so that we can bring workers home safe at the end of the day.

AEM supports fall prevention stand-down

Access International

Written by Euan Youdale

June 3, 2014

The Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM) is actively supporting the National Fall Prevention Stand-Down being held in the USA, 2-6 June.

The campaign promotes greater awareness among construction industry employers and workers about the seriousness of fall hazards.

The stand-down is part of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) ongoing Fall Prevention Campaign, launched in 2012 and developed in partnership with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA). AEM is a member of the Construction Sector Council of NORA, an initiative of the NIOSH.

In 2013, nearly 2500 employers and over 50000 workers took part in regional stand-downs that were held across the US. This year, the goal is to involve 25000 employers and 500000 workers. Falls are the leading cause of death in construction, accounting for 269 of 775 total fatalities in 2012, according to OSHA.

AEM is active in many organisations, coalitions and programs advancing safety and also produces an extensive series of safety manuals, videos and related safety training materials that promote safety awareness in cost-effective, easy-to-follow formats.

More New Yorkers falling to death on the job

WRVO Public Radio (Oswego, N.Y.)

By Ryan Delaney

June 3, 2014

The number of people killed in workplace accidents in New York state as a result of falls has increased, according to the federal government's workplace safety watchdog.

The number of fatalities at construction and industrial sites is decreasing overall, reports the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA), but 42 workers in New York fell to their death in 2012, 10 more than the year before.

This is week is OSHA's fall safety week. The administration's Ron Williams says it important for workers to plan out a job and put safety measures in place before they start a job.

Anytime a worker is four feet off the ground at an industrial site or six feet at a construction job, OSHA's safety requirements kick in.

He says workers feel more empowered now than they used to to speak up about safety concerns.

"In today's age, yes I do see that," he said. "I see more and more workers having a voice and coming to their supervisors and coming to their foremen and planning out a job before they start it."

Williams says he can't cite a specific reason accidents involving falls increased in New York.

"We have seen a rise in New York state and I cannot say specifically. That may be because of more construction. But overall, fatalities nationwide have been reduced. We were over 4,600 in 2012. The year prior, we were higher than that," he said.

Fatal falls often occur when workers aren't properly harnessed or railings and safety bars aren't installed on roofs. Williams says it's important for workers to plan and put safety measure in place before they begin those high-elevated job.

Nucor Decatur taking part in fall safety stand-down

Times-Journal (Fort Payne, Ala.)

June 3, 2014

BIRMINGHAM - Falls are the leading cause of death in the construction industry, and they accounted for 12 percent of all occupational injuries in 2012.

In an effort to prevent these injuries and fatalities through education and outreach, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration has launched the 2014 Fall Safety Stand-Down, which started Monday and runs through Friday.

Subscription required to read entire article.

NATE highlights Safety Week

Radio World

June 3, 2014

The National Association of Tower Erectors is urging its members to participate in OSHA's annual Safety Stand-Down. This year's focus is on falls at worksites and it is entitled, National Fall Prevention Stand-Down.

OSHA explains that a stand-down is "a voluntary event for employers to talk directly to employees about safety."

NATE Executive Director Todd Schlekeway said, "OSHA's National Safety Stand-Down presents a great opportunity for NATE member companies to refocus their attention on fall protection issues currently confronting the industry and educate their employees about fall prevention."

He also directs attention to NATE's 100% Tie-Off 24/7 Awareness Campaign for tower worker safety.

An OSHA certificate of participation is available for companies that complete a survey form at the OSHA website.

OSHA, industry launch safety push on fall protection

Engineering News-Record

By Tom Ichniowski and Scott Judy

June 3, 2014

The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration and construction industry and union groups are teaming up to raise awareness about jobsite protection against falls from height, the leading cause of construction fatalities.

OSHA has launched a program of "Safety Stand-Downs," to take place during the week of June 2-6, in which companies halt work on projects around the U.S., to get briefings and reminders about proper equipment and jobsite steps recommended to avoid or reduce fall injuries.

Labor Secretary Thomas Perez said OSHA expects about 1 million workers to take part in the stand-downs.

OSHA's chief, Assistant Labor Secretary David Michaels, noted that in 2012, falls from heights caused 279 construction worker deaths and more than 8,800 serious injuries. He also said that a lack of fall protection is the most prevalent OSHA violation. Michaels said in a statement, "These falls cause enormous pain and suffering-and we must do everything we can to prevent them."

He also said OSHA was teaming with a long list of construction organizations, including the Associated General Contractors of America, Associated Builders and Contractors and National Home Builders Association.

Among other partners are labor unions, including the carpenters, laborers, electrical workers, and ironworkers. Also taking part are the union-affiliated CPWR-The Center for Construction Research and Training, as well as the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, state OSHAs and others.

Stephen Sandherr, AGC of America CEO, speaking on June 2 at a stand-down at a Balfour Beatty Construction project in Washington, D.C., said, "This is a week when firms bring construction activity to a standstill so they can focus exclusively on making sure their workers have the latest information and tools to ensure their safety."

The stand-down included a hands-on demonstration by George Stallings, a partner with safety-equipment company Sales Solutions Inc., of fall-protection equipment. It focused on what Stallings called the "ABCs"-anchoring devices, body wear and connectors.

Sandherr said AGC will be analyzing each of the 806 U.S. construction fatalities in 2012-the most recent year's data available-to identify "common threads" in those incidents, including those that result from falls. It will share the data with OSHA and any other interested parties.
"Our goal," he said, "is zero fatalities and zero injuries."

AGC also released state-by-state lists showing fatality and injury rates for 2012 and earlier years.
Dean McKenzie, deputy director of OSHA's construction directorate, told the several dozen workers "I've been one of you guys," noting that he had worked in construction for 35 years before joining OSHA.

"I've had a near-fall," McKenzie said. "Scared the crap out of myself. Almost fell 40 feet. Took me about an hour and a half to get down off the beam I was on." He added, "It can happen. It happens fast"

McKenzie said falls aren't necessarily from extreme heights, noting that 21% of the fall-related fatalities in 2012 were from heights of 10 feet or less.

Richard Ryan, Balfour Beatty Construction vice president for operations, told the group at the stand-down, "The importance of events like this were really demonstrated over the weekend for Balfour Beatty." He said a subcontractor employee, ironworker Jose Lopez, died from a fall from height on a company project.

Ryan asked the group to observe a period of silence for Lopez and his family "and remember that these challenges face us every day."

According to a company statement, Lopez, 26, a worker at a $27-million hangar facility project in Jacksonville, Fla., died on May 30 when he fell from atop a 75-ft-tall roof.

Lopez, an employee of subcontractor IMC Steel Inc., was performing metal roofing work on the aircraft hangar structure when the incident occurred, around 3:20 p.m., said Balfour Beatty Construction, the project's construction manager. North Carolina-based IMC Steel was working as a subcontractor to Mark Construction Co., according to OSHA's Jacksonville office, which is investigating.

By June 2, OSHA compliance officers were conducting an on-site investigation at the Jacksonville Aviation Authority (JAA) project, located at Cecil Airport, a former U.S. Navy air base. Brian Sturtecky, area director for the Jacksonville OSHA office, says the agency should have initial findings by June 6.

"This is a tragic incident that our organization is reviewing carefully," Balfour Beatty said in a statement. The company added: "We are focused on supporting [Lopez's] colleagues working on the…project to deal with the tragedy and we are trying to better understand what happened that led to his fall."

ENR was unable to contact IMC Steel for comment. 
The 150,000-sq-ft hangar is being built for Flightstar Aircraft Services. According to JAA's website, the $27-million project is being financed equally by authority and the Florida Dept. of Transportation.

National Safety Stand-Down

Construction Citizen

By Jim Kollaer

June 3, 2014

This week of June 2-6 has been designated National Fall Prevention Safety Stand-Down week by OSHA to help prevent injuries and deaths due to falls on the job.

According to the Department of Labor blog site and OSHA statistics, there were 806 lives lost in construction in 2012 and 300 of them were due to falls on the job.

The current plan is for as many as 25,000 businesses to host "stand-downs" and educational events for over 1 million workers. These events and the safety standards taught in the "stand-downs" will definitely save workers lives across the entire country. During the "stand-down" on the construction sites, the companies will describe fall hazards and show ways to prevent those reportable falls on the job sites.

Please urge your companies and your team members to participate in this important OSHA event. It could save your life. See more details at OSHA's National Safety Stand-Down webpage.

Safety pays, falls cost: Great Lakes Construction Co. hosts OSHA Fall Safety Stand-Down event at Cleveland Inner Belt Bridge Project site on June 3.

EHS Today

By Sandy Smith

June 3, 2014

Falls are the leading cause of death in the construction industry, and they accounted for 12 percent of all occupational injuries in 2012. In an effort to prevent these injuries and fatalities through education and outreach, OSHA is launching the 2014 Fall Safety Stand-Down, which will be held from June 2-6.

An estimated 1 million workers and 25,000 businesses, including construction industry leaders, will halt their work for one hour during that week to discuss the importance of recognizing fall hazards and implementing fall safety measures.

One of our America's Safest Companies winners in 2013, Great Lakes Construction Co., will be a part of this nationwide effort on Tuesday, June 3 beginning at 4 p.m. at the Cleveland Inner Belt Bridge project site, the largest construction site in the state of Ohio, which is being managed by Trumbull, Ruhlin Co. and Great Lakes Construction.

A harness safety presentation will be given by the company's safety supervisor, Tyler Edwards. Heat safety will also be addressed during the stand-down, which is being coordinated through the Cleveland Area OSHA office.

"Falls account for more than a third of all deaths in the construction industry," said Dr. David Michaels, assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health. "One fall can cost an employer their business and a worker their life. Every person participating in these events is showing their commitment to preventing a senseless loss of life and livelihood."

The stand-down is part of OSHA's ongoing Fall Prevention Campaign, which was started in 2012 and was developed in partnership with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and NIOSH's National Occupational Research Agenda program.

The program includes Bill Hocevar and Tyler Edwards with Great Lakes Construction Co.; Howard Eberts, OSHA area director in Cleveland; and Paula Burleson, OSHA onsite consultation.

EHS Today will report on the event.

Mercy Hospital Joplin National Fall Stand Down event

KSNF/KODE-TV (Joplin, Mo.)

Melanie Huonker
June 3, 2014

JOPLIN, MO.--- Safety leaders are raising awareness to prevent fall hazards in construction. Occupational safety and health administration leaders, along with McCarthy building and Mercy construction crews, kicked off the "National Fall Stand Down" at the Mercy Hospital Joplin construction site today. The event encourages people to wear their fall protection, take proper precautions, and plan the construction job ahead. In 2012, 269 of the 775 construction deaths nationwide were because of falls.

"The 269 fatalities were a direct reflection of fall prevention and fall protection lack thereof," Ryan Felton, McCarthy Building Companies On-Site Project Manager.

"A majority of our falls occur from 6 to 15 feet, so we're really not high off the ground and I think there really is some kind of awareness that needs to be brought to the attention," said William McDonald, Actin Regional Administrator for Region 7.

The on-site project director says workers have logged almost 2.1 million man hours since they broke ground on the hospital in January of 2012. Since then, they've had 15 recordable incidents and one lost time accident, which he says shows their strong safety performance.

DJJ to participate in OSHA safety program

Recycling Today

June 3, 2014

The David J. Joseph Co. (DJJ), headquartered in Cincinnati, has announced plans to participate in the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) National Safety Stand Down for Fall Prevention.

Starting the week of June 2, 2014, all 82 DJJ recycling facilities will conduct daily field-based safety meetings focusing on key aspects of fall prevention, the company says. The meetings will include fall hazard recognition; choosing the proper fall prevention systems; ladder safety; maintaining three-point contact; preventing slips, trips and falls on the same level; and a focused review of personal fall arrest gear, according to the company.

DJJ says it appreciates OSHA's efforts in organizing the event. "We support such outreach initiatives that greatly enhance cooperation between the agency and employers to work toward the same goal: a safe and healthful workplace," DJJ states.

DJJ operates six regional scrap recycling companies in the United States that include 73 facilities and nine self-serve auto parts stores. Additionally, the company operates 15 domestic and international ferrous and nonferrous scrap brokerage offices and trades ferro-alloys and specialty pig iron.

Capital Safety, a global provider of fall protection for construction and other high-risk fields, announced the launch of its Every Worker, Every Time effort - a national five-day fall protection and training program focused on the company's mission to bring every worker at height home safely, every workday. The initiative will work hand in hand with OSHA's National Fall Prevention Stand-Down, June 2-6, by visiting construction sites across the U.S. and reaching more than 50,000 workers through safety and compliance training.

Capital Safety launches "Every Worker, Every Time" fall prevention initiative

ForConstructionPros.com

June 3, 2014

The Every Worker, Every Time program will put 36 Capital Safety fully customized fall demonstration trucks on the road, engaging construction workers and safety managers with equipment and fall prevention presentations. The on-site trainings will take place in markets across the nation, and engagement efforts will focus on enhancing awareness, education and compliance with fall prevention measures so workers can do their jobs with confidence.

"We are very proud to align the Every Worker, Every Time initiative with OSHA's efforts to prevent falling hazards in construction," said Kevin Coplan, president of Capital Safety. "Capital Safety is in the business of preventing falls and saving lives. Falls continue to take too many workers' lives and we are committed to changing that. Our tools and resources can help amplify the safety message and support our mission to bring every worker at height home safely."

Falls account for more than one third of all construction deaths each year, the highest number of deaths in the construction industry. To address the safety issue and focus the industry's attention on Fall Prevention, OSHA is advocating for a national safety stand-down during which employers and workers are asked to pause their workday and talk about fall protection.

Capital Safety and its Every Worker, Every Time program will support this national campaign to get out the message that safety pays and falls cost. Along with hands-on demonstrations, Capital Safety will offer other safety resources including eLearning videos and assistance in creating comprehensive fall protection programs to help make compliance simple and create an environment of safety on a jobsite. These components are part of the company's global training program, which features 10 training centers and more than 60 different training courses annually.

Access online education resources including training videos and support materials by visiting the Capital Safety website.

Whatever you do, please don't fall for me!

But why not make the Safety Stand-Down an ongoing part of our work environment?

Site Prep (blog)

By Ron Kubitz

June 3, 2014

Typically my blog posts run more on the humorous side, but this month we will get serious for a bit. It goes without saying that construction safety should be a priority for all who are reading this and the companies that we work for.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has launched a major awareness campaign for June entitled "Preventing Falls in Construction" to raise awareness, educate, and provide resources to prevent injuries and deaths due to poor fall protection. Fatalities caused by falls from elevation continue to be a leading cause of death for construction workers, accounting for 269 of the 775 construction fatalities recorded in 2012, reports OSHA. The sad fact is that most if not all of these deaths were preventable.

The first-ever "National Safety Stand-Down to Prevent Falls in Construction" is the week of June 2-6 with its main goal to raise awareness of preventing fall hazards in construction. So what is a Safety Stand-Down, you ask? A Safety Stand-Down is a voluntary event for employers to talk directly to their employees about safety issues, specifically fall hazards. These can be accomplished through:

  • Hosting a safety meeting or toolbox talk during this time frame as it relates to fall protection.
  • Having team members attend a fall protection course or webinar.
  • Conducting organized fall protection safety equipment inspections.
  • Discussing job-specific hazards as related to falls from elevation or rescue procedures should an incident occur.

The goal is to have more than 25,000 employers and 500,000 workers hold a Safety Stand-Down, thus reaching almost 10 percent of all construction workers in the United States. Employers will be able to provide feedback directly to OSHA and also download certificates of participation on their workers' experience if a Safety Stand-Down is completed any time between June 2 and July 15. Additional training and promotional information can be found on the official OSHA Safety Stand-Down site.

Safety needs to be our number-one priority at the forefront of our minds as we engage in our often dangerous daily work activities. Looking at an even bigger picture, why stop at fall protection? How difficult would it be to have monthly or quarterly Safety Stand-Downs encompassing other important safety topics that are relevant to your particular organization? It is one thing to talk of a safety culture, but how many companies actually live a safety culture? Do a quick Google search on "lack of safety training leads to..." or "a poor attitude toward a safety culture causes…" and you will come across story after story of tragic death and injury most of which could have been avoided.

What is your company doing to set themselves apart in terms of safety and to create a safety culture? Be safe and feel free to share your Safety Stand-Down experiences.

Greg Biffle, OSHA promote safety at Daytona International Speedway following deadly Jacksonville fall

Florida Times-Union

By Don Coble

June 4, 2014

DAYTONA BEACH - Talk of safety replaced work Wednesday at the Daytona International Speedway as officials from the Occupational Safety Health Administration, Department of Labor, construction company Barton Malow and NASCAR driver Greg Biffle talked to 400 workers.

With Daytona Rising, a $400 million renovation of the speedway's main grandstands, serving as a backdrop, workers were reminded of the dangers of construction work by the story of Jose Lopez, who fell 120 feet at the Cecil Commerce Center in Jacksonville last Friday.

"I live in 20 minutes from that site and I drive by it every day on the way to work here," Barton Malow's Josh Maher said. "He had been on the site for 20 days. His brother saw him fall. Things like that really hit home to all of us.

"Accidents like that are preventable."

Lopez, 26, removed his safety harness so he could move from one roof to another when he fell, Maher said.

Maher, Barton Malow vice president Len Moser, OSHA deputy assistant of Labor Jordan Barab and Biffle then made a long presentation on the proper ways for workers to tether themselves to prevent falls.

Biffle was outfitted in one of the safety harnesses and hoisted off the ground to show how harnesses are supposed to work.

Since construction started a year ago, no worker has been seriously injured at Daytona Rising. Construction stopped during the afternoon as part of OSHA's National Fall Safety Stand-Down. Although most workers have years of experience, Barab wanted to make sure nobody gets too comfortable working the high steel.

"We're bringing everyone together, including everyone here at the speedway today, for these events so that we save more lives and prevent more injuries than ever before."

NASCAR driver demonstrates construction safety at Speedway

Daytona Beach News-Journal

By Dinah Voyles Pulver

June 4, 2014

DAYTONA BEACH - A nationwide promotion to make construction workers safer on the job came to the biggest project underway locally on Wednesday - the grandstand reconstruction at Daytona International Speedway.

Hundreds of workers employed with general contractor Barton Malow and its subcontractors gathered on bleachers to hear several safety talks and demonstrations as part of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's National Fall Prevention Stand-down.

Even NASCAR Sprint Cup driver Greg Biffle got in on the action, agreeing to be suspended from a harness a couple of feet above the ground to demonstrate how a worker could use foot holds on a piece of safety equipment to support themselves in the event of a fall.

"The safety side of this business is just as interesting as ours is," said Biffle, driver of the No. 16 Ford. "Safety no matter what we do is important."

The crews at the Speedway were among more than 1 million workers expected to gather across the country this week to try to reduce the number of construction accidents. Nearly 800 construction fatalities were reported in the United States in 2012, according to OSHA.

Falls on the job account for nearly half those deaths, Jordan Barab, OSHA's deputy assistant secretary of labor, told the construction crews. Another 9,000 construction workers are seriously injured every year, Barab said. Many of the workers raised their hands when asked if they'd ever had someone they knew be seriously injured on the job. The crews were reminded that a 26-year-old man was killed in a fall on a Jacksonville construction site last Friday.

Considering all the new safety equipment available, the numbers "are still too high," Barab said.

Clark Construction Group hosts OSHA fall safety stand-down event in Washington, D.C.

ForConstructionPros.com

June 4, 2014

Clark Construction Group LLC will be a part of this nationwide effort by hosting a stand-down event on June 5 at the National Museum of African American History and Culture. Approximately 280 workers are expected to attend the stand-down, which will include remarks by Dr. David Michaels, assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health. Jim Maddux, director of OSHA's Directorate of Construction, will also be in attendance. This is one of several nationwide stand-down events hosted by Clark Construction Group LLC.

"Falls account for more than a third of all deaths in the construction industry," said Dr. Michaels. "One fall can cost an employer their business and a worker their life. Every person participating in these events is showing their commitment to preventing a senseless loss of life and livelihood."

The stand-down is part of OSHA's ongoing Fall Prevention Campaign, which was started in 2012 and was developed in partnership with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and NIOSH's National Occupational Research Agenda program. Falls are the leading cause of death in the construction industry, and they accounted for 12% of all occupational injuries in 2012. In an effort to prevent these injuries and fatalities through education and outreach, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration launched the 2014 Fall Safety Stand-Down, which is being held from June 2-6. An estimated 1 million workers and 25,000 businesses, including construction industry leaders, are expected to halt their work for one hour during the week to discuss the importance of recognizing fall hazards and implementing fall safety measures.

Taking a timeout for safety

Human Resource Executive Online

Posted by Mark McGraw

June 4, 2014

As part of what U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez has described as an "unprecedented event," employers across the country are expected to join the Occupational Safety and Health Administration this week as participants in the National Fall Safety Stand-Down.

Part of OSHA's fall prevention campaign, the stand-down will include "tens of thousands of employers and hundreds of thousands of workers" taking a break from the job to focus on outlining the hazards of falls and improving fall prevention efforts, said Perez in a Department of Labor statement.

According to OSHA, falls are the leading cause of death in the construction industry, and lack of fall protection was the most frequently cited OSHA violation in 2013. Throughout this week, employers and workers in a variety of industries will examine how to change all of that.

For example, the University of Texas at Arlington has joined OSHA staff to kick off fall-prevention events throughout the state of Texas, while Clark Construction Group is hosting a stand-down at the Stanford University Medical Center in Palo Alto, Calif. Today, NASCAR driver Greg Biffle is due to be on hand at the Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Fla., where he will demonstrate fall protection at the facility.

"Falls cause immense pain and suffering when they happen, and we must do everything we can to stop them," said Assistant Secretary of Labor and OSHA head David Michaels, in the DOL statement.
"The good news is that they are preventable with three easy steps. The best protection is to plan ahead, ensure workers have the right equipment and train each worker to use it."

More information on the National Fall Safety Stand-Down-including details on conducting a stand-down, accessing free education and training tools, fact sheets and other resources, and receiving a certificate of participation-is available at www.osha.gov/StopFallsStandDown/.

PCI participates in OSHAs fall prevention stand-down

BusByway

June 4, 2014

PCI participates in Occupational Safety and Health Administrations (OSHA) National Safety Stand Down for Fall Prevention that occurs the week of June 2.

Online PR News - 04-June-2014 - Performance Contracting Inc. (PCI) is pleased to announce its participation in Occupational Safety and Health Administrations (OSHA) National Safety Stand Down for Fall Prevention that occurs the week of June 2. PCI has chosen June 4 as the day every PCI facility will stand-down and conduct a safety meeting focusing on key aspects of fall prevention. This includes fall hazard recognition, choosing the proper fall prevention systems, ladder safety, falls, slips/trips, and an inspection of personal fall arrest gear.

PCI appreciates OSHAs efforts in organizing this event and encourages all contractors to take part in this Stand-Down. said Ed Loosemore, manager of corporate safety.

A safe work environment is PCIs number one priority. Due to our dedication to safety, we have created an award-winning safety program that enables PCI to consistently exceed the expectations of our customers by providing continuing support, education, training and technical expertise regarding safety. With the OSHAs National Safety Stand-Down for Fall Prevention program, we are once again reinforcing these values and keeping the topic of safety in the forefront of everyone's mind.

About the company:

PCI is the largest subsidiary of Performance Contracting Group (PCG). PCG is one of the largest specialty contractors in the United States and has served customers for more than 50 years. It is an employee-owned company with 50+ branch locations and offers more than 25 specialty multi-craft services to the industrial, commercial and nonresidential markets. Currently, PCG employs more than 800 salaried individuals and 6,000 skilled craft workers across the United States and Canada. For more information, visit www.pcg.com.

DPR Construction supports OSHA National Safety Stand-Down to Prevent Falls in Construction

Safety Online

June 4, 2014

SAN FRANCISCO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Fatalities caused by falls from elevation continue to be a leading cause of death for construction workers, accounting for 269 of the 775 construction fatalities recorded in 2012, according to the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Those fatalities were preventable. To help raise awareness of preventing fall hazards in construction, DPR Construction will take part in the National Safety Stand-Down by holding meetings at job sites across the country on Wed., June 4 at the same time to discuss fall hazards and fall protection. Additional safety discussions and trainings will be continued throughout the month as part of a broader company-wide effort to demonstrate the importance of safety in the workplace.

DPR strives to create an Injury-Free Environment (IFE), with the goal of achieving zero incidents on every project. DPR approaches safety as a value and focuses on in-depth training that instills and encourages safe behaviors throughout the company and every project team, including owners, architects and subcontractors. Over the last three years, DPR's OSHA recordable incident rate averaged 1.02, based on more than 5 million total hours worked - making DPR one of the safest contractors in the country.

"Safety is a core part of our culture, and we think zero incidents is an achievable goal," said Doug Woods, Co-Founder, DPR Construction. "Over the last 24 years, we've focused on inspiring thousands of people on jobsites across the country to believe that safety, quality and schedule are not mutually exclusive and that together we can succeed in building injury free. Participation in the National Safety Stand-Down provides another opportunity to demonstrate our commitment to a value we will always honor for our customers, employees and their loved ones."

The purpose of the National Safety Stand-Down is to raise awareness of preventing fall hazards in construction, as fatalities caused by falls from elevation continue to be a leading cause of death for construction workers. DPR values the importance of coming together by supporting OSHA, employees and their families by taking this time to train, talk and understand the best ways to stay safe, as projects and the technologies evolve.

NASCAR driver Greg Biffle promotes fall prevention with OSHA at Daytona Rising

News 13 (Orlando, Fla.)

By Saul Saenz, Volusia County Reporter

June 5, 2014

DAYTONA BEACH -- The harness NASCAR driver Greg Biffle wore for his safety demonstration is entirely different to the harness he is accustomed to wearing on his race car.
It was all part of OSHA's National Fall Prevention Stand-Down event where construction workers who are building the speedway's $400 million facelift, Daytona Rising, took time off to go over safety measures.

"We're bolted into the car in nine different spots," Biffle said. "So our harnesses are very, your safety has come so far and, you know, the same with all these things these guys are doing. Safety is an important role to them."

This is not OSHA's first visit to Daytona Rising.

In April, OSHA investigators looked into an accident involving a worker who had his head stuck in construction equipment.

Wednesday, workers were shown the different harnesses that will keep them safe should any one fall from the grandstands while working.

One worker we spoke with suffered a minor injury while working on Daytona Rising.

"Coming down with a shovel I gotta a little tear on the pectoral muscle," said Justin Erickson, who added he was one of the few workers who was injured while working on Daytona Rising.

Biffle took made a few turns of the screw rather than on the tri-oval helping put in some of the newer, wider grandstand seats.

It's only one of the 40,000 seats that will be available for next year's Budweiser Speedweeks.

"This has got to be a great spot to watch from," the 2003 Coke Zero 400 winner said while sitting on the chair he just bolted together. "And then, you know, we're on the very bottom level of the new section. I mean, it goes up a long ways from here. A great view."

The driver said his participation in the safety program gave him a different perspective of what it takes to renovate a speedway and the view from on top of the stands looking down.

National Safety Stand-Down to reduce construction deaths from falls under way

BNA

By Bruce Rolfsen

June 5, 2014

program. Falls are the leading cause of death in the construction industry, and they accounted for 12% of all occupational injuries in 2012. In an effort to prevent these injuries and fatalities through education and outreach, the

program. Falls are the leading cause of death in the construction industry, and they accounted for 12% of all occupational injuries in 2012. In an effort to prevent these injuries and fatalities through education and outreach, the

program. Falls are the leading cause of death in the construction industry, and they accounted for 12% of all occupational injuries in 2012. In an effort to prevent these injuries and fatalities through education and outreach, the

Hoping to push back rising rates for construction injuries and fatalities, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration launched a national safety stand-down on fall prevention June 2, continuing through June 6.

"Our message is simple: Safety pays and falls cost," OSHA administrator David Michaels told reporters during a June 2 news conference.

OSHA anticipates more than 1 million workers at 25,000 locations could participate in programs associated with the effort, which is the first national OSHA stand-down to address fall protection.

Among the employers taking part June 2 was Turner Construction Co., which held safety briefings at its worksites around the world, where 45,000 people are employed. The focus of the sessions was pre-task planning to identify hazards and develop ways to avoid and mitigate the risks, Turner spokesman Chris McFadden told Bloomberg BNA June 2. Turner has offices in Europe, Asia and across the Americas.

The OSHA stand-down arrives as the construction sector is expanding, bringing in more and often inexperienced workers to building sites (44 OSHR 147, 2/13/14).

"With the economy recovering and housing starts on the rise, this is the moment to ensure that no one has to lose their life in order to make a living," Secretary of Labor Thomas Perez said during the June 2 conference.

Increasing Dangers

While the fatality rate for all industries decreased in 2012 to 3.4 deaths for every 100,000 full-time workers, the building industry's fatality rate grew from 9.1 during 2011 to 9.9 in 2012, with 806 deaths reported, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

For roofers, the 2012 fatality rate was 42.2 deaths per 100,000, up from the 2011 rate of 34.1, the BLS said. For structural iron and steel workers the new rate was 37.0, compared with 30.3 in 2011 (44 OSHR 413, 5/1/14).

A new study (PDF) by analysts with CPWR-The Center for Construction Research and Training pointed out that the while the fatality rate from falls for nonresidential building construction declined by 4.2 percent from 2011 to 2012, the rate increased 81.5 percent for residential construction. For all types of construction, the rate grew 9.3 percent.

On June 2, Michaels emphasized the consultation and education role of OSHA in helping employers comply with agency fall protection rules, urging companies to ask OSHA for advice.

Michaels highlighted the role of industry groups such as the Associated General Contractors, the Associated Builders & Contractors, the National Association of Home Builders, the National Roofing Contractors Association and the Steel Erectors Association of America.

Participating unions include the United Brotherhood of Carpenters, Laborers' International Union, the United Union of Roofers, the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers and the International Association of Iron Workers.

OSHA Fall Safety Stand-Down event this week

Valdosta (Ga.) Daily Times

June 5, 2014

VALDOSTA - Falls are the leading cause of death in the construction industry, and they accounted for 12 percent of all occupational injuries in 2012.

In an effort to prevent these injuries and fatalities through education and outreach, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration launches the 2014 Fall Safety Stand-Down event being held today-June 6.

An estimated 1 million workers and 25,000 businesses, including construction industry leaders, will halt their work for one hour during this week to discuss the importance of recognizing fall hazards and implementing fall safety measures.

Trademark Metals Recycling, located at 2000 W. Savannah Ave., is a part of this nationwide effort from 7-8 a.m. today.

Several workers are expected to attend the event in Valdosta. The stand-down is being coordinated through OSHA's Savannah Area office and will include fall hazard recognition, choosing the proper fall prevention systems, ladder safety, maintaining three-point contact, preventing slips/trips/falls on the same level, the importance of good housekeeping and a review of personal fall arrest gear.

"Falls account for more than a third of all deaths in the construction industry," said Dr. David Michaels, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health. "One fall can cost an employer their business and a worker their life. Every person participating in these events is showing their commitment to preventing a senseless loss of life and livelihood."

The stand-down is part of OSHA's ongoing Fall Prevention Campaign, which was started in 2012, and was developed in partnership with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and NIOSH's National Occupational Research Agenda program.

Safety conference focuses on preventing falls

KUAM-TV (Guam)

By Ken Quintanilla

June 5, 2014

Guam - Nationwide, the number one cause of injury or fatality in the construction industry are due to fall incidents on the worksite. And today, the Guam Contractors Association held its annual safety conference at the Pacific Star Hotel on fall protection in line with OSHA's National Stand Down in Fall Prevention.

GCA president James Martinez said, "What we would expect the takeaway for today is to have these folks go back into the jobsites and have these safety talks and tool box talks at the jobsites to discuss fall protection and fall prevention - its mandated for businesses that an employer has that responsibility to train these people on different aspects of safety."

More than 100 GCA members were in attendance including human resource directors and safety managers featuring a general session by OSHA assistant area director Roger Forstner from Honolulu. Governor Eddie Calvo meanwhile proclaimed June 2 to June 6 in observance of National Stand Down in Fall Prevention for Construction.

Stand down for safety at Nucor Steel

WHNT-TV (Huntsville, Ala.)

By Al Whitaker

June 5, 2014

DECATUR, ALA. (WHNT) - Employees at Nucor Steel in Decatur were literally hanging from the ceiling Thursday. Seriously! It was all part of a safety program sponsored by OSHA. Falls are the leading cause of death and injury in the construction industry. So today, employees stopped work briefly to talk and learn about safety.

This is a steel mill. The work is hard, and occasionally its pretty dangerous.

"Safety is our number one objective," says Melt Shop Supervisor Craig Cost. He says it amounts to, "Lots of training, safety meetings, OSHA training, on-the-job training."

And so the company is taking part in a national effort to remind their employees to take the time to do the job safely.

"It's what we focus on everyday. There's nothing more important than our teammates, nothing more important than the safety of our teammates, and you gotta give 'em the equipment so they can perform their tasks at the absolute most safest way," says Nucor Vice President and General Manager Mike Lee.

This week, the focus is on falls, and how to use equipment to prevent them from happening. It's not that these guys don't already know how to do this, this is remedial training designed to keep safety on the forefront. It can be dangerous work, so safety is on everyone's mind.

"First of all we try to go home to our families, provide for our families and if we get hurt here we know we're no good to our families," says Shipping Utility Operator British Malone.

Lee says customer satisfaction is important. But he says what's more important happens at the end of the day, when your employees can all go home.

As we mentioned, OSHA sponsors this educational effort. They say companies and employees must plan safety into every job, use the right equipment for the job and make certain employees are properly trained in the use of the equipment.

HarborCenter workers "stand down" for safety message

Buffalo (N.Y.) News

By Matt Glynn

June 5, 2014

The workers building HarborCenter paused from their labors Thursday for an important message about safety.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration and M.A. Mortenson, the project's general contractor, hosted a one-hour "stand-down" for about 225 workers at the construction site. It was part of a national OSHA campaign this week teaching workers and their employers about the risks of falls and how to prevent them.

OSHA says falls are the leading cause of death in the construction industry and accounted for 12 percent of all occupational injuries in 2012. "All these falls are preventable," said Gordon DeLeys, an OSHA compliance assistance specialist.

The HarborCenter site experienced the danger a few months ago. An ironworker on the eighth floor took a bad step and fell toward the seventh floor. Fortunately, his safety equipment was properly connected and essentially lowered him to the seventh floor, where he unhooked himself and walked away uninjured, said Ryan Poropat, lead project supervisor for Mortenson.

A job like HarborCenter is big, complex and poses plenty of safety challenges, Poropat said. When completed, the $172.2 million project will consist of two ice rinks along with a hotel, restaurant, a Tim Hortons and other retail space.

Each time a contractor has joined the project, the workers have undergone training for safety practices on the job site, Poropat said. A program like Thursday's was a refresher to guard against complacency. "Following all of the safety rules and regulations related to fall protection is a big deal. It can save your life."

The preparations are paying off, Poropat said. More than 350,000 man- hours have been put into the project, and the site has gone 96 days without a recordable incident, he said.

Poropat said Mortenson typically partners with OSHA at projects around the country to identify safety issues. Through that relationship, OSHA asked if Mortenson would host a fall-safety presentation at HarborCenter.

OSHA estimates 1 million workers and 25,000 businesses will participate in "fall safety stand-down" programs this week. Another one is scheduled for today at Conventus, a project on the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus.

Robert Kulick, OSHA's regional administrator in New York, said OSHA wants workers and their employers to absorb a basic yet meaningful message: Plan for fall hazards on jobs, provide the proper safety protection and train workers to use it. Through the presentations, OSHA drives home the human toll that fall incidents take, as well as the high cost that falls generate in workers' compensation cases.

Kulick took part in a "stand-down" at a New York City site this week that involved 400 workers. He observed the site had already implemented fall-protection standards that exceeded requirements. "I was impressed with that, and I got the sense they were taking it seriously," he said.

When falling down on the job is not a figure of speech

Minneapolis-St. Paul Star-Tribune

Posted by: Evan Ramstad

June 5, 2014

On construction sites, utility poles, energy drilling locations and mines, the greatest danger is losing your feet and falling. Fifty-four Minnesotans died in construction accidents from 2010 to 2012, the latest years for which data is available, and nearly half of those deaths resulted from falls or slips.

This week, Red Wing-based Capital Safety, one of the largest makers of fall protection gear, is aiming to get in front of 50,000 construction workers with demonstrations of the latest in equipment and best practices. The company has 36-specially built safety demo trucks rolling across the country. Their work is part of a broader push by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration this week to get construction firms to focus on fall prevention.

Capital Safety visited workers at both stadiums under construction in the Twin Cities, the Vikings stadium in downtown Minneapolis and the Saints stadium in downtown St. Paul, on Wednesday. On Thursday, one of the places the company visited was the former Pillsbury flour mill just across the Mississippi from downtown Minneapolis. There, about 150 workers are transforming the huge mill into artists studios and lofts by cutting holes on the sides of, and building floors into, 10-story high silos.

Kevin Coplan, president of Capital Safety's North America operations, said the company and industry are focused on developing products that both reduce the force that workers take when they go into a freefall and the distance they go. Federal regulations say that safety equipment may not let a worker fall more than six feet. Even at that distance, the force on the body can be 10 times a person's weight. A 300-pound worker, for instance, would create 3,500 pounds of energy in a six-foot fall.

The most advanced gear is called a "self retracting lifeline" and goes into action the moment it senses a worker's body moving into an accelerated speed. In the demonstration by Capital Safety, a 220-pound weigh was stopped just two feet into a potential six-foot drop. "As soon as it senses a certain speeds, it locks and arrests energy," Coplan said.

OSHA requires fall safety equipment to create a maximum energy of 1,800 pounds. Manufacturers like Capital Safety, 3M and Honeywell, have products that generally have reduced the amount of force from a fall to 900 to 1,350 pounds.

Such safety development work is a relatively unheralded area of high-tech engineering and value-added manufacturing. At Capital Safety's Red Wing plant, there are about 550 manufacturing workers and about 30 in the R&D department. Coplan said the Capital Safety, which is owned by the private equity firm KKR, produces 20 to 30 innovations and new products a year. It has sales units around the world. And every year, hundreds of job superintendents, safety directors and other specialist workers visit Capital Safety training facilities in Red Wing, Texas and California for certification courses in fall protection.

The recovery of the construction industry has been good for Capital Safety's business. Coplan said the firm is seeing growth across every one of its market segments, though. In Minnesota, there were 105,500 people working in construction in April, the latest month for which data is available. That's up from 99,000 a year ago but still well below the pre-recession peak in 2005 and 2006 of 131,000.

Staying safe on work site

KNOP-TV (North Platte, Neb.)

By Kent Winder

June 5, 2014
The new patient tower at Great Plains Regional Medical Center will help the hospital serve more people. With a twist, on Thursday, the construction site turned into a training ground to save lives. It was part of program sponsored by OSHA or the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

Construction on the new patient tower at Great Plains Regional Medical Center stopped for the day. The area was being used for a training program sponsored by OSHA. The exercise is especially aimed at preventing falls. Falls are the number one cause of death on construction site.

Michael Hershey of Sampson Construction Company says, "This is one of a few sites picked in the state to be used for the National Stand down program. A job is basically shut down and all the workers participate in an ongoing seminar of training to heighten their awareness of fall protection as it relates to their individual trade task. We have 17 different trade groups. We have for different trade groups alone that are hanging off the side of the building in what is called swing state scaffolding."

The construction site at Great Plains presents a unique opportunity for training purposes. The size of the project is unlike any in the area. The large project provides many different learning experiences and brings people from a lot of different jobs to the work site all in an effort to heighten safety awareness.

Hershey says, "Some of the workers that are here have had exposure to this type of activity before, many have not. Some of them with different trade groups have never worked on anything taller than two or three stories. This is a rather large building that is unique to this area, unique to the community and also unique to the different trades people."

167 people took part in the fall protection exercise. It goes beyond the construction industry and helps everyone think more about staying safe on the job

3M and Kraus-Anderson team up to curb fall-related deaths in construction

Industrial Safety and Hygiene News

June 5, 2014

To help build awareness of fall hazards in the construction industry, 3M and Kraus-Anderson® Construction Company are participating in the U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Safety Stand-Down June 2-6, 2014. The Stand-Down is a nationwide event for construction companies to take a short break in their workday to educate workers about the importance of fall protection and prevention in the construction industry, which has historically seen high numbers of fall-related fatalities.

"Falls were the leading cause of death in the construction industry and the most frequently cited OSHA standard in 2013," said Chris Dujovski, Construction Segment Lead, 3M. "With more than 40 years of safety leadership, we are encouraging construction companies to use the OSHA Safety Stand-Down as an opportunity to discuss fall prevention strategies and provide additional training to workers on using their fall protection equipment. 3M understands that companies value their workers' safety. Leveraging the Stand-Down is another opportunity to remind their workforce about the proper use of harnesses, lanyards, lifelines and other rescue devices to ensure a safe work environment."

Kraus-Anderson, one of the nation's premier commercial general contractors and construction managers, is holding a Stand-Down on June 3 at 12:30 p.m. on the 3M campus near the corner of McKnight Road and Conway Avenue in Maplewood, Minnesota. The construction site is the future home of 3M's 400,000-square-foot R&D lab. The building will house 700 scientists and researchers in the electrical and energy, safety and graphics and industrial departments.

"Safety is our top priority," said Jake Leoni, Project Site Safety Coordinator, Kraus-Anderson. "We maintain and enforce a vigorous, proactive safety program, which has resulted in a safety record in the top 25 percent in the construction industry and 75,000 hours accident free on the 3M R&D building. As part of our ongoing commitment to safety, we look forward to participating in OSHA's Stand-Down and providing our workers with another opportunity to ask questions about fall protection."

"We're very excited to participate in the Stand-Down event with Kraus-Anderson on the 3M campus," added Andy Smoka, Minnesota OSHA. "It will encourage an open discussion between safety managers and employees about the methodologies and equipment that can be deployed to reduce fall-related risks in the construction industry and potentially save lives."

About 3M

3M captures the spark of new ideas and transforms them into thousands of ingenious products. Our culture of creative collaboration inspires a never-ending stream of powerful technologies that make life better. 3M is the innovation company that never stops inventing. With $31 billion

in sales, 3M employs 89,000 people worldwide and has operations in more than 70 countries. For more information, visit www.3M.com or follow @3MNews on Twitter.

About 3M Personal Safety Division

3M offers a comprehensive, diverse portfolio of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) solutions providing respiratory protection, hearing protection, fall protection, reflective materials for high-visibility apparel, protective clothing, protective eyewear, head and face protection, welding helmets, and other adjacent products and solutions such as tactical safety equipment, detection, monitoring equipment, active communications equipment and compliance management. Visit www.3M.com/PPESafety or http://m.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/PPE_Mobile/Home/?WT.mc_id=m.3m.com/PPESafety.

For more information:

National Safety Stand Down (audio transcript)

WTVG-TV (Toledo, Ohio)

June 5, 2014

This week is national safety stand down week. It aims at preventing falls in construction. Today, representatives from the occupational safety and health administration and Rudolph/Libbe met with construction workers at the Toledo zoo's penguin beach exhibit. Experts discussed the importance of protecting everyone on the site. "Safety is very important on all our projects ... promoting safety today." OSHA leaders also met with worker at the jobsite of the Brandywine condominium project in Monclova township.

On your feet

Freemont County Ranger (Riverton, Wyoming)

By Steven R. Peck

June 5, 2014

Falls at work are a major problem, but usually they are preventable

When the topic is workplace safety, the average person probably thinks about industrial chemical spills, major equipment malfunctions, explosions and the like.

Falling at work probably doesn't leap to mind, but it ought to. Wyoming's Department of Workforce Services, which is the state's branch of the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration, notes that fall prevention is top priority for the agency, with fall hazards ranking among the 10 most-cited safety violations at workplaces.

And if it's a priority for OSHA, then it had better be a priority for your office or shop.

This week is designated across the U.S. as National Fall Prevention Stand-Down. Regulators encourage employers to talk to workers about fall hazards "and the need to reinforce the importance of fall prevention to prevent injuries caused by falls from elevation."

Falls from elevation? That's a term which brings to mind ladders, cranes and catwalks, but even a fall from a bottom step or a pallet being used as a temporary step stool can multiply the risk -- and injury -- from a fall.

Joan Evans is the director of the Wyoming Department of Workforce Services. She reminds Wyoming that falls at work continue to be a leading cause of injuries in the state.

OSHA isn't the favorite agency of any business, but its inspectors are knowledgeable and always willing to work with employers and workers on prevention rather than enforcement -- although they are ready to do the latter if preventable workplace safety problems are not addressed.

Anyone who has ever had an OSHA visit says the same thing: I didn't know there was a problem. Wyoming has put more money in recent years toward safer workplaces. Part of the funding is intended to give supervisors help in improving workplace safety before a violation occurs. That's a lot better than afterward.

Much of the time all that's required is proper labeling and signage to warn workers of a hazard, or some similar step that doesn't involve major retooling or renovation of a shop or office.

These are busy people, but if you ask for help you can get it. To request services or receive more information, call 777-7786 or visit wyomingworkforce.org

If ever the old phrase "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" applies, it's in the arena of workplace safety. Use the people at Wyoming DWS OSHA sooner, and you won't have to deal with them later.

WVU and OSHA help prevent falls in construction

WBOY-TV (Clarksburg, W.V.)

By Krista Baker, Monongalia and Preston County Reporter

June 6, 2014

The summer months are prime time for construction, that couldn't be more true in Morgantown. What some people don't realize is that being a construction worker can get dangerous, especially when you're dealing with extremely high heights.

"When we look at the statistics relating to fall protection, we're looking at from 1992 to 2014 we're looking at an average of 721 workers a year dying in work related falls in the workplace," said Mark Cangemi, a Technical Training Specialist for Honeywell.

Those stats are just from the United States and just at work.

OSHA officials said that fall prevention is one of the top 10 most cited areas of workplace safety. That means there's a lot of room for improvement.

The WVU OSHA Training and Education Center brought in contractors, construction and maintenance workers for training this week.

"When you look at falls from height and construction, first thing you need to do is pre-plan and look at where there will be exposures to falls from height, and then you have to decide what's the best solution," said Mark Fullen, the program leader of the OSHA Training and Education Center at WVU. "That could be putting on a harness and a lanyard, or you could put up a guardrail that prevents you from falling over the edge, or you can put up a scaffold like we have here."

There were also vendors demonstrating safe practices, including Honeywell, the largest personal protective equipment provider in the country.

"I basically just want to answer their questions," said Cangemi. "They know how they do their jobs, the challenges they see out in the workplace, so when they come to me with questions, I'm that resource for them that shows them how to be compliant and how to stay safe."

OSHA is making a difference. Workplace fatalities have dropped by more than 65 percent since 1970 while U.S. employment has almost doubled.

The WVU OSHA Training and Education Center's event wrapped up OSHA's National Safety Stand-Down Week.

Cianbro & OSHA work on fall prevention (video transcript)

WABI-TV (Bangor, Maine)

By Adrienne DiPiazza

June 6, 2014

Falls are the leading cause of death at construction site today, and a local engineering company is trying to prevent those deaths.

Cianbro and OSHA worked together in a fall protection demonstration at Eastern Maine Medical Center construction site.

The site did a full stand-down to recreate what would happen in the event of a fall.

"We now have fall equipment that will prevent fatalities. Over 35% of it, and the tragic part about every one of these fatalities is that they're all preventable,"said John DiCentes, Cianbro Operations Manager.

June is National Fall Prevention Month.

AGC announces aggressive research project to cut construction accidents

For Construction Pros

June 6, 2014

AGC launched an effort to cut construction accidents in Dallas this week during a safety stand down. The association will conduct an exhaustive analysis of the details of each of the 806 construction fatalities that took place across the country in 2012. The objective is to identify the common threads among the fatality incidents. The association wants to know, for example, what is prompting workers to fall, causing them to get struck by equipment, or if current safety gear is appropriate. AGC plans to share its findings with member firms, the federal Occupational Health & Safety Administration (OSHA) and other interested stakeholders. The new effort is designed to complement many steps the association and member firms are already taking to address workplace safety.

AGC is encouraging members and chapter to participate in the campaign. Please visit AGC's Fall Prevention Campaign website and complete the survey.

STEADY U Ohio and BWC partner to prevent falls in construction during National Safety Stand-Down

WorkersCompensation.com

June 6, 2014

Columbus, OH (WorkersCompensation.com) - The Occupational Safety & Health Administration is sponsoring the National Safety Stand-Down to prevent falls in construction from June 2 - 6, 2014. STEADY U Ohio, the state's falls prevention initiative, and the Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation support the national event, recognizing that the construction workforce is aging. Falls are the leading cause of fatalities in the construction industry, and many of these deaths are preventable. In Ohio, 22 people, on average, die from construction-related falls each year, and more are injured. In older workers, these injuries can be devastating.

"With Ohio's aging workforce, it is more important than ever to prevent falls and injuries on job sites. Roofs and ladders are particularly risky for older workers," said Bonnie K. Burman, Sc.D., director of the Ohio Department of Aging, which leads the STEADY U initiative. "Just as we all need training to keep up with changes in technology to better do our jobs, we need training to adjust to our changing senses and balance as we grow older to prevent injuries from falls."

The construction workforce in the state and nation is aging due to a number of factors, including a shortage of qualified workers in some sectors, economic factors that make workers choose to stay employed longer, and technology that has made once demanding tasks easier and safer. While much of falls prevention in construction focuses on falls from heights (such as from a ladder or scaffold), older workers are more likely to be hospitalized for slipping and tripping accidents.

"Slips, trips and falls are the leading cause of lost time injuries in construction and account for 33% of all lost-time injuries," said BWC Administrator/CEO Steve Buehrer. "Providing workers with the right accommodations and equipment, and assuring that they have the knowledge and training to use them properly, will help prevent future falls on construction sites."

A Safety Stand-Down is a voluntary event for employers to talk directly to employees about safety. STEADY U and BWC encourage Ohio construction companies and contractors to identify risk areas for falls, particularly those involving their older employees, and then improve the environment to prevent future falls. OSHA provides resources to help companies conduct a safety stand-down at www.osha.gov/StopFallsStandDown/.

Stand-downs prevent falling down: Taking a break to focus on safety

KTAR-Radio (Phoenix, Ariz.)

By: Miranda Rivers/Cronkite News

June 8, 2014

WASHINGTON -- Workplace safety is Toni DiDomenico's job, but she's passionate about it for another reason: 18 years ago, she had to investigate the death of a worker who fell off the back of a rolling truck.

"And still, 18 years later, I can still see his face with the blood behind his head and his blank eyes staring at the sky," DiDomenico said.

That fatality was the "one-too-many" for DiDomenico who now works to ensure that fall safety is taken seriously at Arizona worksites for Ryan Cos. -- one of the businesses that took part this week in a national push to prevent workplace falls.

The U.S. Department of Labor's National Safety Stand-Down encouraged construction firms to set aside an hour this week to focus on fall safety and to engage in proper procedures to prevent falls -- the leading cause of death in the construction industry.

The department estimated that as many as 1 million workers at 25,000 participating businesses took an hour off this week for the stand-down. Several were in Arizona, including the Ryan Cos., where DiDomenico said more than 400 employees, managers and vendors stood down at a worksite at Marina Heights at Tempe Town Lake.

Speakers at the Tempe event included Arizona Division of Occupational Safety and Health employees and the Phoenix-area director of the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Kyle Schoenberger, Ryan Cos. safety superintendent, gave a toolbox talk on fall prevention complete with a trivia contest with prizes for employees.

This week's event came amid criticism by federal officials of Arizona's fall-protection regulations for the residential construction industry. In March, OSHA sent a letter to the Industrial Commission of Arizona noting "a number of areas where Arizona's residential fall protection standards are less effective than federal OSHA's."

The major concern was that Arizona required limited, if any, fall protection for employees working between 6 and 15 feet high. OSHA requires the use of conventional fall-protection equipment, such as fall-arrest systems, nets, or guardrails, at heights of 6 feet or higher.

In April, Gov. Jan Brewer signed SB 1307 (PDF), a bill that set new standards for workplace-fall protection in the state. Some safety provisions were added, but DiDomenico does not believe it fully complies with federal regulations.

"The state of Arizona does not recognize that there are feasible ways to protect employees," she said.

"It's a red flag. It's plain as day that we are not as effective as the federal government," DiDomenico said.

The law itself contains a provision calling for its automatic repeal if OSHA rejects the state's changes.

While that process is going on, businesses have taken the lead on spreading the message of fall protection, said Jeremy Bethancourt, program director of Arizona Construction Training Alliance, pointing to this week's stand-down events.

"It means that employers are willing and know how important it is to train and reaffirm the importance of using fall protections," Bethancourt said. "It is employers who have taken the initiative to embrace the message of the stand-down and relay that to their employees."

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that seven workers -- four of them construction workers -- died in falls in Arizona in 2012. Nationally, 269 people died in construction falls that year, the bureau said.

Bethancourt said it worries many construction firms that Arizona's fall protection guidelines are not in line with those of the federal governments.

And few people know that worry more than DiDomenico, who said she is sometimes hesitant to meet people on a job site, knowing that any one of them could become another fatality.

"You want to minimize the number of people that you meet and speak to because you are increasing your percentages of something happening," she said.

The National Safety Stand-down: Preventing Falls in Construction

Environmental Expert

June 10, 2014

Last week over one million workers and 25,000 businesses took part in OSHA's National Safety Stand-down to Prevent Falls in Construction. This was a voluntary event that encouraged employers across the country to speak with their employees about fall hazards and fall prevention measures.

Falls are the leading cause of death in the construction industry, with fall prevention one of the most frequently cited OSHA standards. This event was designed to help educate both workplaces and employees on ways that injuries and fatalities from falls can be prevented.

OSHA also provided eight helpful suggestions for how an organization could hold their own fall prevention stand-down:

  1. Start early so the stand-down is organized, coordinated and everyone involved understands their role and duties.
  2. Ask everyone involved with your project to participate (ex. subcontractors, owner, architects, etc.).
  3. Review your fall prevention program for a more effective stand-down.
  4. Establish key messages, goals and activities that will fit your workplace needs.
  5. Determine the date and length of the stand-down.
  6. Actively promote the stand-down.
  7. Hold the stand-down.
  8. Review the success of your stand-down and make changes accordingly.

The National Safety Stand-down last week was a chance for employers to speak directly with their employees about safety on construction sites, specifically fall prevention. Safety stand-downs provide a key opportunity for workplaces to have an open door stream of communication, making employees comfortable enough to reach out to employers about unsafe conditions or concerns. Last week's collaborative efforts were a great start to "standing down for safety" to save lives.

Employers who participated in the nation-wide Safety Stand-Down can provide feedback about their Stand-Down to receive a "Certificate of Participation," signed by the Secretary of Labor, Thomas E. Perez.

For more information you can check out the June 6, 2014 edition of Intelex's EHS This Week podcast that covers the National Safety Stand-down, as well as other top headlines in the world of environment, health and safety!

National Safety Stand-Down Week

Bangor (Maine) Daily News

June 10, 2014

In 1970 Congress passed the Occupational Safety and Health Act. The law made employers legally responsible for providing a safe workplace for their employees. The Act also created the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to oversee workplace health and safety standards and to make sure that employers abide by the law.

It is unfortunate that it requires governmental action and continued oversight to do something that should be self-evident. Certainly progress has been made of the past 40+ years. But employees and employers must be vigilant. Complacency is the enemy.

This week is National Safety Stand-Down Week. According to the Department of Labor falls are the leading cause of death in the construction industry. Today, over 40 years since Congress passed the Occupational Safety and Health Act, hundreds of workers still die each year because of falls. Almost all of these deaths are preventable with simple steps such as making sure the best protections are available to each worker and making sure that each worker is trained how to use the equipment.

Despite all of the progress that has been made over the years there are still employers out there who either because of greed or simple complacency, put workers in harm's way.

The National Safety Stand-Down is an opportunity for employers and employees to stop (stand down), and take a moment to remind each other of the importance of focusing on fall hazards and fall prevention. The "stand down" can take place during a brief 15 minute training session or something more elaborate.

There are scheduled Stand-Downs in all 50 states. I would encourage all employers to take a moment, stand down and be forever vigilant with fall safety. It just might save a life.

Over 1,300 workers on Adolfson & Peterson Construction job sites "stand-down" to prevent falls in construction

Albuquerque Business First

June 11, 2014

MINNEAPOLIS, June 11, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Adolfson & Peterson Construction (A&P), one of the nation's leading general contractors, conducted a coast-to-coast effort to participate in the National Safety Stand-down to prevent falls in construction.

The national stand-down event, held June 2-6, 2014 and initiated by the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA), encourages construction employers and workers to pause during the workday to talk about fall prevention and discuss topics such as ladder safety, scaffolding safety and roofing work.

In total, 1,389 workers on 39 Adolfson & Peterson Construction job sites from Seattle, Washington to Charlotte, North Carolina participated in the individual "stand-downs" during the week. Programs varied by site, but all followed OSHA guidelines for fall protection education, and workers received recognition for participating. As an example, workers on a Tempe, Arizona job site witnessed the impacts of falls in a demonstration utilizing a crash dummy in a harness.

"We take safety very seriously at A&P," states Paula Eick, national safety director at Adolfson & Peterson Construction. "Fall prevention is a key area of focus in maintaining safe job sites, and we are extremely pleased with the excitement and commitment our teams have shown in participating in the national stand-down."

According to OSHA statistics, falls are one of the leading causes of injuries and deaths in the construction industry. The National Stand-Down is part of OSHA's Fall Prevention Campaign that started in 2012. As part of the campaign OSHA provided employers with education materials and provided a means for participating workers to receive personalized certificates.

About Adolfson & Peterson Construction
Adolfson & Peterson Construction is a U.S.-based, privately held firm that is consistently ranked among the top 50 construction managers and general contractors in the nation. Founded in 1946, the company has built longstanding commitments to the regions in which it operates and is known nationally for its innovative and collaborative approaches within the building industry. Adolfson & Peterson Construction serves the education, multifamily, healthcare, energy, commercial, municipal and senior living market segments from its offices in Charlotte, Dallas, Denver, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, Phoenix, Portland and Tacoma. For more information, visit www.a-p.com and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.

OSHA focusing on fall hazards, temp workers, exposure limits

Canadian Occupational Safety

Written by Amanda Silliker

June 11, 2014

While other industries are experiencing declines, the numbers are going up on construction, largely due to an increase in construction projects around the country and new workers coming on board, said Michaels, speaking at the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE) conference in Orlando on June 10.

Fatalities caused by falls from elevation continue to be a leading cause of death for construction workers, accounting for 269 of the 775 construction fatalities recorded in 2012.

To help prevent fall hazards in construction, OSHA spearheaded a national safety stand-down the first week of June. More than one million workers and 25,000 employers participated in the stand-down.

Nearly one-half (45 per cent) of falls that occurred during 2011-12 were from less than 20 feet; and more than 20 per cent of falls were incurred at 10 feet or less. OSHA "remains very concerned about falls and not just falls from heights," said Michaels.

Temporary workers

Temporary workers are another concern for OSHA. There are 23 per cent more temporary workers now than before the recession, with a large concentration in manufacturing, said Michaels.

"Now, with the economy coming back, the temporary work is going gangbusters," he said. "Every month, the largest sector of growth, 10 to 15 per cent, is in temporary employment."

Various studies show temporary workers are three to four times more likely to be injured or killed on the job. There are a number of reasons for this such as they are new to the workplace, they are often offered the most hazardous jobs and employers are less likely to devote resources to train them, said Michaels.

"We see week after week these first day fatalities - workers who get to the job and are killed on their first day. It is a very big issue right now."

Michaels is calling on health and safety professionals to work with employers and let them know their obligations to train all workers - temporary or not.

And the training must be provided in language and vocabulary the workers understand, he said.

Permissible exposure limits

OSHA is also tackling permissible exposure limits (PELs). These have not been updated in the U.S. since the 1960s and many are very out of date, said Michaels. In fact, he cautions employers against using the limits set out in OSHA legislation.

"Don't simply try to rely on OSHA standards, because OSHA standards are not safe. It's a little revolutionary for the head of OSHA to say don't rely on our standard, but you can do better and you should do better," said Michaels.

Silica is of particular interest to OSHA. Exposure to silica can cause silicosis, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, kidney disease and rheumatoid arthritis.

"The one PEL we want to change sooner than later is silica. Workers are heavily exposed to silica, especially in the construction industry. We believe exposures are getting worse because there is more powered equipment used in construction than ever (before)," said Michaels.

A new silica standard is needed that reduces the current PEL of 100 µg/m3 (micrograms per per cubic metre) to 50 µg/m3, he said.

"We have strong evidence that lung cancer and silicosis have exposures below 100 µg/m3, so we

need to reduce those exposures and we know it is economically and technologically feasible."

Some ways employers can reduce the exposure to silica are through water sprays, enclosures and dust collection vacuums.

How to break through apathy and other barriers to implementing safety training on the jobsite

Equipment World

By Amy Materson

June 11, 2014

As many as a million construction workers participated in OSHA's National Fall Safety Stand Down last week. I saw a number of press releases, photos and tweets from companies that were participating in the event. However, one of the first news articles I read on Monday was about a fatal fall by a construction worker in Chicago.

While holding an event like this is great to raise awareness, it's important to translate those lessons learned during the photo ops to the jobsite. Taking part in an initiative like this won't help your employees unless they are able to apply that information to their individual circumstances on the jobsite.

We often provide tips on ways to implement safety lessons on the jobsite, but you must recognize and address the barriers you will encounter while implementing training. Here are three obstacles to be on the lookout for:

Apathy

Workers with considerable construction experience often feel they know everything there is to know, and there's nothing new to be learned. If they've worked for many years and been lucky enough not to have an accident in spite of unsafe behavior, they may be convinced their "common sense" way is the right way. Bringing them around to your way of thinking will take time, but it can be done with patience and reinforcement, combined with a reasonable but firm attitude that continuing unsafe behavior will not be tolerated.

Time

Shortcuts are called shortcuts for a reason. Working safely will require a greater time investment than doing things the "easy" way. This obstacle can be removed with a top-down approach; supervisors must make it clear to the crews that they will not be pressured to hurry through equipment walk-arounds, installation of trench boxes, safety barriers, etc. and other time-consuming safety measures.

Value

If you only act like safety matters to you during training and toolbox talks, it won't matter much to your employees when they're working. Don't merely pay lip service where safety is concerned; your workers will see through it in a second. Demonstrate a consistent commitment-and require the same of your supervisors-and the abstract ideas in your safety meetings will become a reality on your jobsites.

Cal/OSHA takes action following spate of construction fatalities

Safety.BLR

June 11, 2014

Cal/OSHA is taking a hard look at safety compliance at construction sites in the San Francisco Bay area following four fatalities in 4 days last month. California construction employers should be on notice.

Inspectors have been dispatched to Bay Area construction worksites throughout the coming weeks to determine if adequate measures have been taken to identify safety hazards and prevent injury. Christine Baker directs the Department of Industrial Relations, which includes Cal/OSHA. She noted, "Construction sites present special challenges to worker safety. Employers need to have strong safety programs in place and train their workers to follow procedures."

Cal/OSHA says the four recent fatalities illustrate the hazards of working at heights.

  • On May 18, a construction worker was killed when the train bridge he was dismantling in Riverside collapsed, crushing him.
  • On May 20, a worker on a San Mateo project tumbled 9 feet from a wall sustaining fatal head injuries.
  • Also on May 20, in San Diego, a worker near the top of a 22-foot rebar column was killed when the column fell on him.
  • And on May 21, a worker at a residential project in San Jose fell to his death from a three-story building.

The incidents are all under investigation.

Cal/OSHA says its inspectors will be looking for compliance with fall protection regulations-from railings on buildings to personal devices like hooks that attach to vests. The agency will also review trench safety, equipment safety, and potential site hazards like power lines.

If inspectors find a lack of protection or a serious hazard, they can stop work at the site until the hazards are abated. Employers who fail to comply with state safety regulations will be cited and ordered to correct the violations, Cal/OSHA notes.

The crackdown in California comes on the heels of last week's safety stand-down for falls in construction by federal OSHA. The awareness event reached more than a million employees. Falls are among the most common reason for workplace injuries and fatalities in California, as well as elsewhere across the country. Title 8 of the California Code of Regulations specifies requirements for fall protection in construction. It covers safety nets, fire protection, personal fall arrest systems, guardrails, excavation, roofing, and excavation, among other topics.


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