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Controlling mercury exposure is best accomplished through substituting it with a non-toxic chemical, depending on the application. If this cannot be done, engineering, administrative, and personal protective equipment (PPE) should be used.

  • Breeding, D. "Safe Use and Handling of Mercury." Occupational Health Safety 70.10(2001): 72-74, 76, 92-93.
  • MacLehose, R., et al. "Mercury Contamination Incident." J. Public Health Med. 23.1(2001): 18-22.
  • International Chemical Safety Cards: Mercury. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Provides fire and health hazard information as well as spill cleanup and storage recommendations.
  • Mercury, Elemental and Inorganic Compounds (PDF). New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services (NJDHSS) Right to Know Hazardous Substance Fact Sheet, (2009, November). Contains hazard summary information, control strategies, and common questions and answers. Also available:
  • Protect Your Family Reduce Contamination at Home (PDF). US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 97-125. Provides information, for people who work with mercury and other harmful substances, on how to reduce the transfer of contaminants from work to their homes.
  • NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication 2005-149, (2007, September). Contains exposure limits, physical description, and personal protective equipment options for various mercury air concentrations.

*Accessibility Assistance: Contact OSHA's Directorate of Technical Support and Emergency Management at (202) 693-2300 for assistance accessing PDF materials.

All other documents, that are not PDF materials or formatted for the web, are available as Microsoft Office® formats and videos and are noted accordingly. If additional assistance is needed with reading, reviewing or accessing these documents or any figures and illustrations, please also contact OSHA's Directorate of Technical Support and Emergency Management at (202) 693-2300.

**eBooks - EPUB is the most common format for e-Books. If you use a Sony Reader, a Nook, or an iPad you can download the EPUB file format. If you use a Kindle, you can download the MOBI file format.

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