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Safety and Health Program Check-Up

If you want to find out how your safety and health program measures up, take a few minutes to complete the following survey. There are no right or wrong answers. This check up will help identify areas where improvements can be made.

  1. Management Leadership and Employee Involvement

    1. Clear worksite safety and health policy

      • We have a S&H policy and all employees accept, can explain, and fully understand it
        We have a S&H policy and majority of employees can explain it
        We have a S&H policy and some employees can explain it
        We have a written (or oral, where appropriate) policy
        We have no policy

    2. Clear goals and objectives are set and communicated

      • All employees are involved in developing goals and can explain desired results and how results are measured
        Majority of employees can explain results and measures for achieving them
        Some employees can explain results and measures for achieving them
        We have written (or oral, where appropriate) goals and objectives
        We have no safety and health goals and objectives

    3. Management Leadership

      • All employees can give examples of management's commitment to safety and health
        Majority of employees can give examples of management's active commitment to safety and health
        Some employees can give examples of management's commitment to safety and health
        Some evidence exists that top management is committed to safety and health
        Safety and health is not a top management value or concern

      Management Example

        All employees recognize that managers in this company always follow the rules and address the safety behavior of others
        Managers follow the rules and usually address the safety behavior of others
        Managers follow the rules and occasionally address the safety behavior of others
        Managers generally follow basic safety and health rules
        Managers do not follow basic safety and health rules

    4. Employee involvement
      • All employees have ownership of safety and health and can explain their roles
        Majority of employees feel they have a positive impact on identifying and resolving safety and health issues
        Some employees feel that they have a positive impact on safety and health
        Employees generally feel that their safety and health input will be considered by supervisors
        Employee involvement in safety and health issues is not encouraged nor rewarded

    5. Assigned safety and health responsibilities
      • All employees can explain what performance is expected of them
        Majority of employees can explain what performance is expected of them
        Some employees can explain what performance is expected of them
        Performance expectations are generally spelled out for all employees
        Specific job responsibilities and performance expectations are generally unknown or hard to find

    6. Authority and resources for safety and health

      • All employees believe they have the necessary authority and resources to meet their responsibilities
        Majority of employees believe they have the necessary authority and resources to meet their responsibilities
        Authority and resources are spelled out for all, but there is often a reluctance to use them
        Authority and resources exist, but most are controlled by supervisors
        All authority and resources come from supervision and are not delegated

    7. Accountability

      • Employees are held accountable and all performance is addressed with appropriate consequences
        Accountability systems are in place, but consequences used tend to be for negative performance only
        Employees are generally held accountable, but consequences and rewards do not always follow performance
        There is some accountability, but it is generally hit or miss
        There is no effort towards accountability

    8. Program Review (Quality Assurance)

      • In addition to a comprehensive review, a process is used which drives continuous correction
        A comprehensive review is conducted at least annually and drives appropriate program modifications
        A program review is conducted, bit it doesn't drive all necessary program changes
        Changes in programs are driven by events such as accidents or near misses
        There is no program review process

  2. Workplace Analysis

    1. Hazard identification (Expert survey)

      • Comprehensive expert surveys are conducted regularly and result in corrective action and updated hazard inventories
        Comprehensive expert surveys are conducted periodically and drive appropriate corrective action
        Comprehensive expert surveys are conducted, but corrective actions sometimes lags
        Expert surveys in response to accidents, complaints, or compliance activity only
        No comprehensive surveys have been conducted

      Hazard identification (Change analysis)

        Every planned or new facility, process, material, or equipment is fully reviewed by a competent team, along with affected workers
        Every planned or new facility, process, material, or equipment is fully reviewed by a competent team
        High hazard planned or new facility, process, material or equipment are reviewed
        Hazard reviews of planned or new facilities, processes, materials, or equipment are problem driven
        No system for hazard review of planned or new facilities exists

      Hazard identification (Job and process analysis)

        A current hazard analysis exists for all jobs, processes, and material; it is understood by all employees; and employees have had input into the analysis for their jobs
        A current hazard analysis exists for all jobs, processes, and material and it is understood by all employees
        A current hazard analysis exists for all jobs, processes, or phases and is understood by many employees
        A hazard analysis program exists, but few are aware of it
        There is no routine hazard analysis system in place

      Hazard identification (Inspection)

        Employees and supervisors are trained, conduct routine joint inspections, and all items are corrected
        Inspections are conducted and all items are corrected; repeat hazards are seldom found
        Inspections are conducted and most items are corrected, but some hazards are still uncorrected
        An inspection program exists, but corrective action is not complete; hazards remain uncorrected
        There is no routine inspection program in place and many hazards can be found

    2. Hazard Reporting System

      • A system exists for hazard reporting, employees feel comfortable using it, and employees feel comfortable correcting hazards on their own initiative
        A system exists for hazard reporting and employees feel comfortable using it
        A system exists for hazard reporting and employees feel they can use it, but the system is slow to respond
        A system exists for hazard reporting but employees find it unresponsive or are unclear how to use it
        There is no hazard reporting system and/or employees are not comfortable reporting hazards

    3. Accident/Incident Investigation

      • All loss-producing incidents and near-misses are investigated for root cause with effective prevention
        All OSHA-reportable incidents are investigated and effective prevention is implemented
        OSHA-reportable incidents are generally investigated; accident cause and/correction may be inadequate
        Some investigation of incidents takes place, but root cause is seldom identified and correction is spotty
        Injuries are either not investigated or investigation is limited to report writing required for compliance

    4. Injury/illnesses analysis

      • Data trends are fully analyzed and displayed, common causes are communicated, management ensures prevention; and employees are fully aware of trends, causes and means of prevention
        Data trends are fully analyzed and displayed, common causes are communicated and management ensures prevention
        Data is centrally collected and analyzed and common causes are communicated to supervisors
        Data is centrally collected and analyzed but not widely communicated for prevention
        Little or no effort is made to analyze data for trends, causes and prevention


  3. Hazard Prevention and Control

    1. Timely and effective hazard control

      • Hazard controls are fully in place, known to and supported by workforce, with concentration on engineering controls and safe work procedures
        Hazard controls are fully in place with priority to engineering controls, safe work procedures, administrative controls, and personal protective equipment (in that order)
        Hazard controls are fully in place, but there is some reliance on personal protective equipment
        Hazard controls are generally in place, but there is heavy reliance on personal protective equipment
        Hazard control is not complete, effective, and appropriate

    2. Facility and Equipment Maintenance

      • Operators are trained to recognize maintenance needs and perform and order maintenance on schedule
        An effective preventive maintenance schedule is in place and applicable to all equipment
        A preventive maintenance schedule is in place and is usually followed except for higher priorities
        A preventive maintenance schedule is in place but is often allowed to slide
        There is little or no attention paid to preventive maintenance; break-down maintenance is the rule

    3. Emergency Planning and Preparation

      • There is an effective emergency response plan and employees know immediately how to respond as a result of effective planning, training, and drills
        There is an effective emergency response plan and employees have a good understanding of responsibilities as a result of plans, training, and drills
        There is an effective emergency response plan and team, but other employees may be uncertain of their responsibilities
        There is an effective emergency response plan, but training and drills are weak and roles may be unclear
        Little effort is made to prepare for emergencies

      Emergency Equipment

        Facility is fully equipped for emergencies; all systems and equipment are in place and regularly tested; all personnel know how to use equipment and communicate during emergencies
        Facility is well equipped for emergencies with appropriate emergency phones and directions; majority of personnel know how to use equipment and communicate during emergencies
        Emergency phones, directions and equipment are in place, but only emergency teams know what to do
        Emergency phones, directions and equipment are in place, but employees show little awareness
        There is little or no effort made to provide emergency equipment and information

    4. Medical Program (Health Providers)

      • Occupational health providers are regularly on-site and fully involved
        Occupational health providers are involved in hazard assessment and training
        Occupational health providers are consulted about significant health concerns in addition to accidents
        Occupational health providers are available, but normally concentrate on employees who get hurt
        Occupational health assistance is rarely requested or provided

      Medical Program (Emergency Care)

        Personnel fully trained in emergency medicine are always available on-site
        Personnel with basic first aid skills are always available on-site, all shifts
        Either on-site or near-by community aid is always available on day shift
        Personnel with basic first aid skills are usually available, with community assistance nearby
        Neither on-site nor community aid can be ensured at all times


  4. Safety and Health Training

    1. Employees Learn Hazards (How to Protect Themselves and Others)

      • Facility is committed to high quality employee hazard training, ensures all participate, and provides regular updates; in addition, employees can demonstrate proficiency in, and support of, all areas covered by training
        Facility is committed to high quality employee hazard training, ensures all participate, and provides regular updates
        Facility provides legally required training and makes effort to include all employees
        Training is provided when the need is apparent; experienced employees are assumed to know the material
        Facility depends on experience and informal peer training to meet needs

    2. Supervisors Learn Responsibilities and Underlying Reasons

      • All supervisors assist in worksite hazard analysis, ensure physical protections, reinforce training, enforce discipline and can explain work procedures based on the training provided to them
        Most supervisors assist in worksite hazard analysis, ensure physical protections, reinforce training, enforce discipline and can explain work procedures based on the training provided to them
        Supervisors have received basic training, appear to understand and demonstrate importance of worksite hazard analysis, physical protections, training reinforcement, discipline and knowledge of work procedures
        Supervisors make responsible efforts to meet safety and health responsibilities, but have limited training
        There is no formal effort to train supervisors in safety and health responsibilities

      Managers Learn Safety and Health Program Management

        All managers have received formal training in safety and health management responsibilities
        All managers follow, and can explain, their roles in safety and health program management
        Managers generally show a good understanding of their safety and health roles and usually model them
        Managers are generally able to describe their safety and health roles, but often have trouble modeling them
        Managers generally show little understanding of their safety and health management responsibilities