Safety & Health Management Systems eTool
Safety and Health Program Assessment Worksheet


III. HAZARD PREVENTION AND CONTROL

A. Timely and effective hazard control Hazard controls are fully in place, known and supported by work force, with concentration on engineering controls and safe work procedures.
Hazard controls are fully in place with priority to engineering controls, safe work procedures, administrative controls, and personal protective equipment (in that order).
Hazard controls are fully in place, but there is some reliance on personal protective equipment.
Hazard controls are generally in place, but there is heavy reliance on personal protective equipment.
Hazard control is not complete, effective, and appropriate.


B. Facility and Equipment Maintenance Operators are trained to recognize maintenance needs and perform and order maintenance on schedule.
An effective preventive maintenance schedule is in place and applicable to all equipment.
A preventive maintenance schedule is in place and is usually followed except for higher priorities.
A preventive maintenance schedule is in place but is often allowed to slide.
There is little or no attention paid to preventive maintenance; break-down maintenance is the rule.


C-1. Emergency Planning and Preparation There is an effective emergency response plan and employees know immediately how to respond as a result of effective planning, training, and drills.
There is an effective emergency response plan and employees have a good understanding of responsibilities as a result of plans, training, and drills.
There is an effective emergency response plan and team, but other employees may be uncertain of their responsibilities.
There is an effective emergency response plan, but training and drills are weak and roles may be unclear.
Little effort is made to prepare for emergencies.


C-2. Emergency Equipment Facility is fully equipped for emergencies; all systems and equipment are in place and regularly tested; all personnel know how to use equipment and communicate during emergencies.
Facility is well equipped for emergencies with appropriate emergency phones and directions; majority of personnel know how to use equipment and communicate during emergencies.
Emergency phones, directions, and equipment are in place, but only emergency teams know what to do.
Emergency phones, directions, and equipment are in place, but employees show little awareness.
There is little or no effort made to provide emergency equipment and information.


D-1. Medical Program (Health Providers) Occupational health providers are regularly on-site and fully involved.
Occupational health providers are involved in hazard assessment and training.
Occupational health providers are consulted about significant health concerns in addition to accidents.
Occupational health providers are available, but normally concentrate on employees who get hurt.
Occupational health assistance is rarely requested or provided.


D-2. Medical Program (Emergency Care) Personnel fully trained in emergency medicine are always available on-site.
Personnel with basic first aid skills are always available on-site, all shifts.
Either on-site or nearby community aid is always available on day shift.
Personnel with basic first aid skills are usually available, with community assistance nearby.
Neither on-site nor community aid can be ensured at all times.
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