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Construction Management Industry

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Construction Management Industry Menu

Safety Resources

Construction work consists of a broad spectrum of activities, many of which are inherently dangerous. The following links, organized by topic, provide resources to assist professional managers in creating a safer work environment.

Asbestos
  • Asbestos. OSHA Safety and Health Topics Page. Provides safety and health information relative to asbestos in the construction industry. The heaviest asbestos exposures occur in the construction industry, particularly during the removal of asbestos during renovation or demolition.
  • Respiratory Protection. OSHA eTool. Helps employers and employees comply with the OSHA Respirator Standard. Contains helpful information on how to select a respirator appropriate to the exposure hazard, and how to develop a change schedule for gas/vapor cartridges.
  • The Asbestos Advisor 2.0. OSHA Expert System. Provides an introduction to the scope and logic of the regulation for the general industry, shipbuilding, and construction.
  • 29 CFR 1926.1101 OSHA's Asbestos Standard for the Construction Industry. OSHA Slide Presentation. Addresses asbestos exposure in the workplace, including regulated areas, exposure assessments and monitoring, methods of compliance, respiratory protection, etc.
Concrete and Masonry
Cranes, Hoists, and Derricks
  • Crane, Derrick, and Hoist Safety. OSHA Safety and Health Topics Page.
  • Cranes. OSHA Steel Erection eTool. Contains a module specific to the regulations in the revised steel erection standard that apply to hoisting and rigging.
  • Crane Safety Awareness for Site Superintendents. OSHA Video. Discusses some of the hazards and risks involved in crane operations and identifies information managers should be familiar with if cranes are operating on their site.
Electrical Hazards
  • Electrical. OSHA Safety and Health Topics Page.
  • Electrical Incidents. OSHA Construction eTool. Looks at electrical hazards on the construction site, from overhead power lines to ground-fault protection. Includes background information describing how electricity works and the kinds of human injuries it can cause.
Emergency Preparedness
Fall Protection
  • Fall Protection. OSHA Safety and Health Topics Page. Provides safety and health information relevant to fall protection in the construction workplace. Each year, falls consistently account for the greatest number of fatalities in the construction industry.
  • Falls. OSHA Construction eTool. Addresses fall hazards common to construction, including ladders, unguarded steel rebar, and unprotected sides, wall openings and floor holes.
  • Steel Erection. OSHA eTool.
Recordkeeping
Safety and Health Management
  • $afety Pays Program. OSHA. Assists employers in estimating the costs of occupational injuries and illnesses and the impact on a company's profitability.
  • Construction Safety: Choice or Chance. OSHA Video. Highlights the four leading causes of fatalities on construction sites and stresses the responsibility for safety as a joint effort of government, management, and employees.
Scaffolding
  • Scaffolding. OSHA Safety and Health Topics Page.
  • Scaffolding. OSHA eTool. Provides a comprehensive look at the OSHA Scaffolding Standard, with animations to help highlight key concepts, a slide presentation, and supplemental information on planking.
  • Falls. OSHA Construction eTool. Includes a page on the hazards of improper scaffold construction.
  • Scaffolding. OSHA Slide Presentation. Provides slides presenting information on OSHA scaffold standard and general requirements for all scaffolds.
Trenching/Excavation
  • Trenching and Excavation - Construction. OSHA Safety and Health Topics Page. Provides safety and health information relevant to trenching and excavation. Excavating is recognized as one of the most hazardous construction operations.
  • Trenching and Excavation. OSHA Construction eTool. Discusses ways to control the hazards associated with trenching and excavation.
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